Judge Joseph Sackett

(1680-1755)
FatherCapt. Joseph Sackett (1655/56-1719)
MotherElizabeth Betts (c 1660-between 1700 & 1710)
Judge Joseph Sackett, of English Kills, Newtown, Long Island, New York, son of Capt. Joseph Sackett and Elizabeth Betts, was born in NewtownG in 1680.1 He died in English KillsG on 26 September 1755.1,2 He married on 23 May 1706, Hannah Alsop, daughter of Capt Richard Alsop and Hannah Underhill.1,3 Hannah was born in 1690.1,3 She died on 17 June 1773.2,3 On 19 August 1731, Judge Joseph was appointed attorney by his 14-year-old nephew Joseph S Sackett, son of Judge Joseph's deceased brother Simon.4
     Joseph made his will on 31 March 1755, naming as beneficiaries his wife Hannah, his sons William, Thomas, Joseph, John, James and Samuel, his daughters Elizabeth and Hannah, and the children of his late daughters Frances Blackwell and Deborah Stringham. The will was proved on 22 October 1755.1
     Joseph was named as a beneficiary in his father's will made in Newtown, Queens CountyG, on 20 September 1719.

Children of Judge Joseph Sackett and Hannah Alsop


23. Judge Joseph Sackett, 1680–1755, of English Kills, Newtown, Long Island, N. Y., son of (7) Capt. Joseph and Elisabeth Betts Sackett, was married, May 23, 1706, to Hannah Alsop, 1690–1773, daughter of Capt. Richard Alsop and his wife Hannah. Judge Sackett was, says Riker in his "Annals of Newtown," "a man of probity, a Justice of the Peace and a Judge from 1749 to his death, Sept. 26, 1755," and it may be added that he was an office holder in the Presbyterian Church, took an active part in public affairs, and was ever held in high esteem by his townsmen. In 1724 he and his brother-in-law, John Alsop, purchased jointly the central portion of the "Chambers-Southerland Patent," located on the west shore of the Hudson River, in the town of New Windsor, Orange County, N. Y. There they built a substantial wharf, erected a commodious storehouse and established a sloop freight and passenger line, which ran at stated intervals to and from New York City. They also started and maintained for a number of years a flat-boat ferry at that place, which carried horses and cattle, as well as human beings to and from a point near what afterwards became Fishkill Landing, on the opposite shore. This ferry, which was the first of its kind established on the central Hudson, was extensively patronized previous to the Revolution. It is a matter of history that in July, 1775, Morgan and his famous body of riflemen crossed the river on this New Windsor ferry when hastening to join Washington's army at Boston. Not long after that date it was discontinued.
     John Alsop, who was by profession a lawyer, located at New Windsor at the time of the before mentioned purchase, but after remaining there a few years sold out his interest to Joseph Sackett, Jr., his partner's oldest son, and took up the practice of his profession in New York City, where he acquired marked prominence.
     The Sacketts, it would seem, did not long remain entirely content with their holdings in New Windsor. Colonial land papers show that on Jan. 11, 1727, a patent was duly issued to Nathaniel Hazzard and Joseph Sackett for 4, 000 acres in adjoining town of Blooming Grove; that on July 7, 1736, a patent for additional plots containing 2,000 acres located near that last mentioned, was issued to Joseph Sackett, Jr., and that on Sept. 1, 1737, a third patent for another 2,000 acres in same vicinity was issued to Joseph Sackett. The extensive grants covered a considerable portion of what is now one of the most populous and productive farming districts in Orange County, N. Y.
     In 1749 a land company, composed of Joseph Sackett, Jr., his brother John Sackett, and eight other men of local prominence, was organized under the title of "The Proprietors of New Windsor." To this company the Sacketts transferred all of their New Windsor real estate except the wharf and storehouse property. The "Proprietors" laid out the entire unimproved portion of their purchase in village lots and township plots, and a considerable number of new dwellings were added to the settlement; but already the importance of the village as a commercial centre had begun to decline, and to-day (1907), what was then the business portion of New Windsor is a veritable "Deserted Village," with a church in which no service has been held for years, dilapidated dwellings, and no signs of commercial life save the unsightly sheds of several brick yards at the river's edge. But the township plots on the western bounds of the tract have become the country seats of families of wealth, and constitute one of Newburgh's aristocratic suburbs.
     The original records, consisting of rude maps and transfer data of "The Proprietors of New Windsor," is in possession of the "Historical Society of Newburgh Bay and the Highlands," at Newburgh, N. Y.
     Judge Sackett was never an actual resident of New Windsor. He died at English Kills, Sept. 27, 1755. His wife, Hannah Alsop Sackett, outlived him nearly eighteen years, her death occurring June 17, 1773, in the 83rd year of her age. Judge Sackett's will is recorded in the New York City records of probate and reads in part as follows:
Will of Judge Joseph Sackett.
     In the name of God Amen, Mar. 31, in the year of our Beloved Lord Christ 1755, I Joseph Sackett of Newtown, in Queens County, being in perfect health . . . My executors to pay all debts and clear my land that is mortgaged to the Loan Office at Jamaica in Queens County. My executors are to sell all my lands lying in the Patent of Goshen in Orange County, except the land that is to be laid out at Wawayanda, or the other lands belonging to the patent or a Round Hill, so called, and what land belongs to me joining the same. It lyeth between the land of Hezekiah Howell and Thomas Coleman. And what land I have lying between a brook called Perry's and a hill called Caar Matthews on said hill. Reserving in all the lands they sell three quarters of all mines and minerals with privilege to dig and carry off same, and to erect buildings for that use. They are also to sell all my lands in New Jersey, reserving the same privileges. And they are also to sell all my lands and Meadows in Newtown, except what I shall give to my wife and my son William.
     I leave my wife Hannah one half of the lands and buildings hereinafter named, during her widowhood, and the other half to my son William, viz - My Mansion house and all the buildings and lot of ground they stand on, and all my lands on the east and south sides of the road that leadeth from Newtown to New York ferry except a lot I bought of John Culver, and all my lands and meadows lying on the west side of said road as far as the lower end of Smiths Island. And also my land swamp at a place called Juniper swamp, and a piece of upland and fresh meadow bounded east by Francis Morel, north by the middle ditch, west by a ditch that runs through my meadow joining to John Ketcham and Rapalye and the creek above Cars Mill. And after my wife's death my son William to have the whole, and to pay his brother Thomas and his sister Elizabeth Fish each £100.
     I leave to my sons Thomas and William all my wearing clothing. To my son Joseph a silver headed cane. To my daughter Elizabeth Fish the choice of my Negro girls. To my son William, a Negro boy. I leave to my wife Hannah one half of the rest of my movables and the remainder to be sold to pay my debts.
     I leave to my six sons Joseph, John, James, Samuel, Thomas and William a hill called Round Hill, lying between the lands of Hezekiah Howell and Thomas Coleman (in Orange County) also a piece of land lying between the brook called Perry's brook on a hill called Car Matthews, but on condition that if there be any mines or minerals on said land or lands I have sold in New York and West Jersey, they shall pay to my daughter Hannah on thirteenth of the clear profit, and also to Elizabeth Fish and the children of my deceased daughter Frances Blackwell, and the children of my deceased daughter Deborah Stringham, and to my wife, two thirteenths.
     If my son William dies without issue then his lands go to the rest of my children. My executors are to sell so much cleared land joining the lot I bought of Jonathan Culver as will make it 40 acres with that lot, and they are to sell all my upland and fresh meadows, joining to Thomas Monell on the main ditch and the road.
     The above, signed by Joseph Sackett and witnessed by Richard Hollett, Jr., James Way, Jr., and Thomas Way, was probated Oct. 22, 1755.
Children of Judge Joseph and Hannah Alsop Sackett.
     85. Joseph Sackett, b. Mar. 5, 1707, d. in year 17__; m. Milicant Clowes.
     86. Richard Sackett, b. June 30, 1709, d. Feb. 11, 1726.
     [87 was skipped]
     88. Hannah Sackett, b. Aug. 7, 1711, d. July 26, 1762; m. Thomas Whitehead.
     89. Elizabeth Sackett, b. Aug. 15, 1713. d. Dec. 17, 1721.
     90. John Sackett, b. May 15, 1716, d. Mar. 2, 1783; m. Phoebe Burling.
     91. Deborah Sackett, b. Nov. 18, 1718, d. Jan. 10, 1754; m. James Stringham.
     92. Frances Sackett, b. Dec. 4, 1720, d. Feb. 4, 1754; m. Joseph Blackwell.
     93. James Sackett, b. Sept. 12, 1722, d. Sept. 12, 1784; m. Frances Dekay.
     94. Samuel Sackett, b. June 23, 1724, d. Sept. 29, 1780; m. Mary Betts.
     95. Thomas Sackett, b. Dec. 27, 1726, d. June 27, 1769; m. Phebe Alburtis.
     96. Elizabeth Sackett, b. June 25, 1729, d. Apr. 10, 1778; m. Jonathan Fish.
     97. William Sackett, b. Aug. 27, 1731; d. May 1, 1776; m. Deborah Fish.

See alsoThurmon King's Database, 5864
ChartsLine 3a (American)

 Notes & Citations

  1. Charles Weygant, The Sacketts of America, "23. Joseph Sackett, b. in 1680, d. Sept. 27, 1755; m. Hannah Alsop."
  2. James Riker, The Annals of Newtown, in Queens County, New-York: containing Its History from its first Settlement, D Fanshaw, New York (1852), "Joseph Sackett, son of Joseph, received a considerable property from his father, and resided at the English Kills, on the premises late Judge Jones’. He was a man of probity, a justice of the peace, and a judge from 1749 till his death, which occurred at an advanced age, Sep. 26, 1755. His wife Hannah, dau. of Richard Alsop, survived till June 17, 1773. Their ch. were Joseph,4 John, James, Samuel,5 Thomas, William, Elizabeth, who m. Jonathan Fish; Hannah, m. Thomas Whitehead; Frances, m. Jacob Blackwell; and Deborah, who m. Jas. Stringham."
  3. Stuyvesant Fish, Ancestors of Hamilton Fish and Julia Ursin Niemcewicz Kean, His Wife, (Online image. WorldVitalRecords. From the Quintin Publications Collection) (1929), p. 85, "Children of Richard Alsop and Hannah Underhill were:
    4. Hannah, married Judge Joseph Sackett May 23, 1706. She was born in 1690 and died June 17, 1773. He was born in 1680 and died Sept. 26, 1755."
  4. Hunterdon [NJ] County Records 1701-1838,
    "Power of attorney dated 19 Aug. 1731 of Joseph Sackett, aged ca. 15 years., son of Simon and Mary Sackett, of Trenton dec'd to "my dear beloved and honored uncle Joseph Sackett of New Town, Queens County, Island of Nassau" yeoman, "my guardian"...to dispose of any real and personal property "until I become twenty and one". Wit: J. Forster and Chas. Reilly. No date of recording."
Generation.Tree4L.3a
Sackett line3rd great-grandson of Thomas Sackett the elder
Last Edited19 June 2019
 

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