Newspaper Abstracts, Pennsylvania

107 records

  • Indiana Progress, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Thursday, 8 Oct 1874, p. 5, col. 1.
    "State and County.
    If John M. Sackett, alias Don Milton, had worked as hard to make an honest living as he did a dishonest one, he would not now be serving out a seven year's sentence in the Penitent[i]ary. Boys, learn trades, and then when you grow to be men you will not have to steal to make a living."
    [Transcribed from WorldVitalRecords image by Chris Sackett]
  • Indiana Progress, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Thursday, 8 Oct 1874, p. 5, col. 4.
    "Court Proceedings.
    Quarter Session.
    Same [Commonwealth] vs John M. Sackett. John P. Blair, pros. Burglary and larceny. True bill. Def't. pleads guilty. Sentenced to pay a fine of six cnts and be confined four years in Western Penitentiary."
    [Transcribed from WorldVitalRecords image by Chris Sackett]
  • Indiana Progress, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Thursday, 25 May 1876, p. 5, col. 1.
    "State and County.
    O.P. Sackett and Wm. Topper, charged with breaking into a postoffice, at Clarksburg, this county, were sentenced in the U.S. District Court, Pittsburg, to pay $100 fine each and imprisonment at hard labor in the Western Penitentiary for four years."
    [Transcribed from WorldVitalRecords image by Chris Sackett]
  • Indiana Progress, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Thursday, 7 Sep 1876, p. 5, col. 2.
    "State and County
    Wm. Topper and O.P. Sackett were about two months ago sent to the penitentiary for four years for robbing the postoffice at Clarksburg, Indiana county. Last week they were brought from the penitentiary to Greenburg for trial on a charge of robbing and then burning the store of Messrs. Wray & Ashbaugh, opposite Leechburg, in Westmoreland county. At the time of their arrest their house was searched and a large quantity of stolen goods found. The pwnership of these has been traced to Messrs. Wray & Ashbaugh. Their private trademark is upon some of the boots, and the plunder is evidently a part of that stolen from them in November last. These offenders are veterans in crime. Topper is now serving his fifth term in the penitentiary, and Sackett his second."
    [Transcribed from WorldVitalRecords image by Chris Sackett]
  • Indiana Progress, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Thursday, 17 Jan 1878, p. 5, col. 3.
    "Local Items.
    State and County.
    The Grand Lodge of the Ancient Order of United Workmen of Pennsylvania, at its session last week, in Pittsburg, installed the following officers for the ensuing year: … Representative to the Supreme Lodge, M.W. Sackett."
    [Transcribed from WorldVitalRecords image by Chris Sackett]
  • Indiana Progress, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Thursday, 1 May 1879, p. 2, col. 5.
    "Items of Interest.
    Sackett's marsh, near Berlin, Wis., covers 760 acres, and has been known to yield a crop of cranberries in one year of 35,000 bushels."
    [Transcribed from WorldVitalRecords image by Chris Sackett]
  • Conneautville Courier, Crawford County, Pennsylvania, October 1885.
    "MARRIAGES: Williams–Watson—At the residence of the officiating Justice in Saegertown, Sept 30th, 1885, by Homer M. Sackett, Esq., Mr. Mark W. Williams of Watson's Run and Miss Mollie E. Watson of Norrisville."
    [Transcribed from Newspaper Abstracts image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, January 11, 1889, p. 1, col. 5.
    "A STRANGE CONTRAST.
    One Sister Lies Cold in Death While the Other is Being Married.
    [SPECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE DISPATCH.]
    New York, January 10.—Sadness and joy were strangely contrasted in the house of Mr. George W. Sackett, at 525 Madison street, Brooklyn, on "Wednesday night. His l0-year-old daughter, Bessie Hedges Sackett, lay dead in the front room on the second floor, while in the parlor underneath the Rev. Robert J. Kent was officiating at the marriage of Miss Susie Dorish Sackett, the eldest daughter of Mr. Sackett, to Fred Baker Morris, in the presence of 60 guests.
    Little Bessie had been sick for some time, but had been looking forward with the much girlish interest to the marriage of her sister. Her death came so unexpectedly at 1 o'clock in the afternoon that there was no time to notify the invited guests, and it was deemed advisable to go on with the ceremony. All the flowers which Miss Sackett had intended to wear, and which were sent by friends, were placed around the couch on which her dead sister reposed."
    [6056 Bessie Hedges Sackett & 6051 Susan Dorsch Sackett daus George Washington Sackett & Josephine Dorsch]
    [See also Brooklyn Eagle]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, January 17, 1889, p. 4, col. 7.
    "GOSSIP OF A GREAT CITY.
    The Editor Hit Too Hard.
    [NEW YORK BUREAU SPECIALS.]
    New York, January 16.—Thomas Potter, a wealthy contractor, wishes the Jersey City courts to help him squeeze $10,000 out of William E. Sackett, editor of the Sunday Morning News. About ten years ago Mr. Potter began to protect Mrs. Plume, a widow, and her small boy. Mrs. Plume lived at Mr. Potter's house until a few months ago. By that time young Plume, who had learned a thing or two in his maturer years, became dissatisfied with the home relations. He induced his mother eventually to come to New York and live with him. Mr. Potter objected to this, and had young Plume arrested for embezzlement. Plume proved Potter's charges to be false, and got $500 from him as damages for slander. Mr. Sackett's paper has been exceedingly severe on Mr. Potter in its comments on the case, hence the action."
    [5080 William Edgar Sackett Jr]
    [See also The Sun, New York City, January 18, 1889]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, April 6, 1889, p. 6, col. 5.
    "A Prominant Farmer's Financial Failure.
    [Special telegram to the Dispatch.]
    AKRON, O., April 5.—William C. Sackett, a prominant farmer of this county and President of the Summit County Agricultural Society, made an assignment to-day. The assets are several hundred acres, worth $33,000; liabilities not stated."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, May 26, 1889, p. 3, col. 1.
    "IT STIRS UP HISTORY.
    The Razing of Wylie Avenue Wesleyan Church Recalls War
    AND SECESSION FROM BRIMSTONE.

    There is an old building now being demolished on Wylie avenue, below Tunnel street, which many people whose memories carry them back 50 years think should not be allowed to be carted away unhonored, unsung and forgotten, as it is connected with some of the most stirring episodes in the history of abolitionism in this city and section, in the days when, wherever an audience of anti-slavery men could be gotten together, the burning eloquence of such men as A. B. Bradford, of Enon Valley, was heard, and both Democratic and Whig mobs were defied. …
    After the congregation dissolved the building was used for a time by the temperance people and Murphy lectured in it. Subsequently the Hebrews converted it into a synagogue and finally it was condemned by the Building Inspector. For many years Calvin C. Sackett taught school in the lower story. His pupils were colored children and it was about the only place in this part of the city that colored folks were educated during many years. Mr. Sackett lives on Logan street at present. …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, May 26, 1889, p. 5, col. 7, repeated July 14, 1889.
    [Advertisement]
    "Fleishman & Co, Pittsburg, PA
    Cut prices on PATENT MEDICINES AND DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES

    Hair Dressing, J. H. Sackett's........ 35c …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, August 20, 1889, p. 4, col. 7.
    "TRI-STATE TRIFLES.
    Charles Weber and E. M. Sackett, of Erie, went fishing two days ago and caught a 57-pound muskallonge. He was gamy and fought like a Turk, nearly upsetting the boat, but a well-aimed blow from a boathook quieted him."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, September 14, 1889, p. 7, col. 3.
    "MONMOUTH BEACH.
    It Will Require at Least $150,000 to Repair the Damage.
    Monmouth Beach, N. J., September 13.—Thousands of persons came here to-day to see what damage had been wrought by the storm. Big gangs of men were at work removing furniture from some of the cottages, and bracing up the twisted and shattered bulkheads. The Episcopal Church of St. Peter's, in Galilee, lost part of its bulkhead last night. The sea has torn away a portion of the bulkheading of the cottage of John P. Duncan. The bulkheads of the summer homes of Henry Tuck, D. Sackett Moore and J. A. Scrymser have gone out to sea.
    It will cost at least $150,000 to repair the damage at Monmouth and Low Moor, formerly Monmouth Beach North."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, January 23, 1890, p. 2, col. 2.
    "UNITED WORKMEN.
    Financial Operations of the Order During the Month of December.
    … Mr. McNair also received the statement of financial transactions of the Supreme Recorder, M. W. Sackett, of Meadville, Pa. …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, February 25, 1890, p. 4, col. 4.
    "Grand Opera House
    "The Deacon's Daughter" is not a very strong play, but Miss Annie Pixley generally contrives to make it amusing. … Frederic Sackett and William Friend posed as two society cranks, modeled on the creations of "Puck" …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, June 5, 1890, p. 1, col. 5.
    "FAILURE OF A PAPER COMPANY.
    A Big Concern Run Into the Ground In Very Short Order.
    [SPECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE DISPATCH.]
    Providence, June 4.—The Richmond Paper Company this noon assigned to the Treasurer, F. M. Sackett, which action practically winds up the business. In February, 1889, the company was on a good basis, with a paid up capital of $800,000, with assets of $885,000 and liabilities of $668,000, including a mortgage note to the Rhode Island Hospital Trust Company. In May, 1889, a second mortgage was given to Thomas C. Greene to secure about a dozen of the directors, who agreed to put in $300,000 additional capital, $100,000 of it to be used as working capital.
    At a meeting of the stockholders soon after it was voted to leave the management of the whole thing to the directors. Business became bad and in July they suspended and in September shut down, and have remained closed ever since. In May of this year they were attached for $16,000 by W. F. Sayles, who claimed a royalty, ahd the assignment is the result of that. The plant ot the concern is on tbe Seekonk river, and cost $130,000, but is not worth quarter of that now."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, June 25, 1890, p. 6, col. 4.
    "THE GIST OF THE NEWS
    M. W. SACKETT, of Meadville, was yesterday elected S.R.D. at the Supreme Lodge, A.O.U.W., in session at Boston."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, August 5, 1890, p. 5, col. 5.
    "DIED. SACKETT—On Monday, August 4, 1890, at 5:40 P.M., Rev. CALVIN SACKETT, in his 80th year.
    Notice of funeral hereafter."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, August 6, 1890, p. 5, col. 3.
    "SACKETT—On Monday, August 4, 1890, at 5:40 P.M., Rev. CALVIN SACKETT, in his 80th year.
    Funeral services at his late residence, 75 Logan street, on Wednesday afternoon, August 6, at 3 o'clock. Interment private."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, November 16, 1890, p. 13, col. 1.
    "SECRET SOCIETIES
    A.O.U.W.
    Center Avenue Lodge, No. 124, had a very large meeting last Tuesday evening, on which occasion it was unexpectedly visited by Supreme Master Workman Wilson, of Detroit, and Supreme Recorder M. W. Sackett, of Meadville, Pa. This lodge is still keeping up the good work.

    The A.O.U.W. was well represented in the Fraternal Congress, having three officers and one committeeman of that body in the following persons: Supreme Master Workman W. Warner Wilson, Detroit, Mich.; Supreme Receiver John J. Acker, Albany, N.Y.; Supreme Recorder M. W. Sackett, Meadville, Pa., and Dr. D. H. Shields, Hannibal, Mo."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, January 4, 1891, p. 7, col. 8.
    "POKER ROOM RAIDED.
    Eleven Persons Captured Playing a Game on Smithfield Street.
    The first poker room raided in the city for a long time was pulled last evening at 510 Smithfield street, over A.M. & J.B. Murdock's store. The police have suspected the place, and shortly after midnight a squad of officers under Detective McTighe and Lieutenant Denniston made the haul. Eleven victims were captured and locked up. They gave fictitious names.
    Sam Sackett was the doorkeeper, and an information will be made against him tomorrow as the proprietor. When Detective McTighe succeeded in getting into the room, Sackett grappled with him and tried to throw him out, but the wiry little detective proved the best wrestler, and he landed the doorkeeper on his back. No other attempts were made to resist the officers, and the players took their medicine with wry faces."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, January 5, 1891, p. 2, col. 6.
    "SUNDAY HEARINGS

    A number of over-sensitive persons who had been hypnotized by the blue-coated minions of the law on Saturday night were rudely awakened from their mesmeric visions of flowery beds of ease by the police magistrates at the Sunday morning hearings.

    Samuel Sackett was committed to jail for court trial in default of $1,000 bail for keeping a gamnbling house on Smithfield street, opposite the post office. Ten men captured in the raid on the house on Saturday night were fined $10 and costs each."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, January 17, 1891, p. 8, col. 2.
    "CRIMINAL COURT CALENDAR.
    List of the Cases to Be Called for Trial Next Week.
    … Samuel Sackett, …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, January 21, 1891, p. 9, col. 7.
    "To-Day's Trial Lists.
    Criminal Court— … Samuel Sackett, …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, January 22, 1891, p. 5, col. 3.
    "BEFORE JUDGE STOWE
    Samuel Sackett pleaded guilty to keeping a gambling house, and will be sentenced Saturday."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, March 13, 1891, p. 6, col. 3.
    "RELIGION CALLED IN
    DURING A HEARING ON THE BENEFIT INSURANCE BILL
    One Man Says They Will Exclude Catholic Societies From Operating in the State—Pittsburg Secret Order Men Favor the Passage of the Bills.
    … Harrisburg, March 12.—There was a largely attended meeting of the House Insurance Committee to-night to hear arguments of representatives of the fraternal societies of the State upon the various bills aimed at the fraudulent bond and investment and so-called beneficial societies. …
    George Maloney, of Franklin, and M .W. Sackett, of Meadville, representing the Ancient Order of United Workmen, asked that the bills be amended so as to define the distintive features of a beneficial society. These were the lodge system, representative government, ritualistic work, fraternal assistance to [those] living in sickness and destitution, payment of benefit for disability, and payment of benefits to the family or representative at death. …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, March 15, 1891, p. 13, col. 1.
    "SECRET SOCIETIES
    O.U.A.M.

    Supreme Recorder M. W. Sackett, of Meadville, and Grand Master Workman Maloney, of Franklin, appeared before the Insurance Committee at Harrisburg Thursday evening.

    Past Master Workman H. F. James, of Franklin Lodge No. 3, at Franklin, Pa., who represents his district in the Legislature, was in the city during the week, and left for Harrisburg in company with Grand Master Workman Maloney and Supreme Recorder Sackett."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, March 15, 1891, p. 13, col. 2.
    [SECRET SOCIETIES—continued]
    "The Heptasophs.
    The Porter bill, introduced by Senator Porter in the Pennsylvania Legislature, has been affirmatively recommended by the Committee on Insurance. The bill was at length discussed on Thursday evening last before the Committee on Insurance by George Maloney, G.M.W. of the A.O.U.W.; M. W. Sackett, Supreme Recorder A.O.U.W.; …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, April 6, 1891, p. 2, col. 5.
    "DEMANDS TOO HIGH.
    Ohio Operators Threaten to Quit the Inter-State Compact,
    IF THE MINERS ARE PERSISTENT.

    Tbe inter-State convention of miners and mine operators of Pennsylvania and Ohio will convene in tbe Court House to-morrow at 2 o'clock P. M., for the purpose of considering and determining upon the scale of prices to be paid for mining coal during the coming year, beginning May 1. …
    Among the Ohio operators at tbe Monongahela House are A. L. Hart, Glouster; Joseph Staller and C. L. Poston, Nelsonville; A. M. Job, W. S. Courtright and H. R. Sackett, Columbus, and R. N. Staller, New Straitsville. …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, April 28, 1891, p. 4, col. 6.
    "Bijou Theater.
    There is sensation and to spare in "Kidnapped," the patent package of realism which D. K. Higgins and company opened for the benefit of the public at the Bijou last night. … The company is a very fair one, Miss Georgia Waldron, Miss Dickie Delaro, and Messrs. Arthur Byron, Ben Sackett, and several others deserving especial praise for conscientious work. …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Indiana Progress, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Wednesday, 19 Aug 1891, p. 6, col. 6.
    "Pennsylvania Pickings.
    Postal changes for the week. … New postoffices have been established as follows: … At Sackett, Elk county, with Wm. R. Leake as postmaster."
    [Transcribed from WorldVitalRecords image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, November 7, 1891, p. 6, col. 2.
    "YESTERDAY'S HOTEL ARRIVALS
    CENTRAL— … M. W. Sackett, Meadville; …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, February 9, 1892, p. 12, col. 7.
    "NARROW ESCAPE FROM DROWNING.
    Exciting Experience of a Party of Yale Students and Their Lady Friends.
    New Haven, Conn., Feb.—[Special.]
    —A number of Yale students and their lady companions had a narrow escape from death yesterday afternoon, while skating on Lake Whitney. This place is a favorite resort for skaters, and yesterday it is estimated that there were fully 1,500 persons on the ice. Over in one corner of the lake a party of students and a half dozen ladies were enjoying themselves, apart from the regular body of skaters. The ice was not as thick as in other parts of the lake, as it had been recently cut by the ice harvesters. Suddenly a splash was heard, and the startled students looked around and saw W. J. Sackett and Miss Lombard struggling in the water. An unknown man came swiftly skating down the lake, and before anyone could warn him he had skated right through the crowd and into the same hole.
    The students threw thenfselves flat on the ice and formed a rescuing line by catching hold of each other's skates, but six of the students broke through and were struggling in the water. A ladder and rope were sent for, but before these arrived the students had again formed another line, and Miss Lombard, by this time thoroughly chilled, was rescued and taken to a nearby house. The students were also rescued in the same way, but the unknown man could not be thus reached, and he was extricated by means of the ladder and rope."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, April 8, 1892, p. 3, col. 6, repeated April 15, 22 & 29, 1892.
    "AUCTION SALES
    THOS. M. MARSHALL, JR., ATTORNEY AT LAW, 117 Diamond Street, Pittsburg, Pa.
    ORPHANS' COURT SALE—NOTICE IS hereby given that a sale of properties hereinafter described will take place under order of the Orphan's Court …. The first piece of property being described as follows: All that certain piece or parcel of ground situated in the Seventh (late Sixth) ward, city of Pittsburg … bounded and described as follows: Beginning (and fronting) on the easterly side of Scott street, at the distance of 24 ft. from Hazel (formerly Decatur) street, thence extending along Scott street, southerly 25 ft. 9 inches, more or less, to center of a 2 ft. 11 in. alley, at the corner of lot of ground of H. W. Sackett; thence extending back easterly, preserving the same width between lot No. 112 in the same plan and the line of Sackett's lot …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, April 8, 1892, p. 9, col. 5.
    "HUNDREDS OF HOMES
    Soon to Be Founded in Two Newly Opened Indian Reservations
    SISSETON TO BE FIRST SETTLED
    Boomers on the Oklahoma Border Have Their Hopes Deferred
    THE SCENES OF THE BOUNDARY LINE
    St Paul, April 7.—Governor Mellette, of South Dakota, to-day directed the Sheriffs of Codington, Grant, Day, Marshall and Roberts counties, which adjoin the Sisseton reservation lands to be opened next week, to summon 100 each for a posse and take charge of the Sisseton reservation when the Government lets go at noon of the 15th. They will be backed by the entire State militia, and there are already on hand at near Bowmansville, Minn., 200 or 300 regular soldiers to keep order in that neighborhood, should the boomers seem likely to come to blows over any of the large number of choice claims.

    A dispatch from Kingfisher, O.T., says: Since Judge Sackett left yesterday for Washington with duplicate reports of the Indian allotments the report of delay in the opening of the reservations has been confirmed. It is not probable that the lands will be opened for settlement before the 18th, and perhaps not before the 22d of April. The delay was caused by the failure of the mail to get the reports to Washington soon enough to satisfy the Interior Department, hence Sackett was wired to report in person with the allotments.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Pittsburg Dispatch, Pennsylvania, September 18, 1892, p. 20, cols. 4–5.
    [Advertisement]
    "THE ALVIN THEATRE
    CHARLES L. DAVIS......OWNER AND MANAGER
    WEEK BEGINNING MONDAY SEPT. 19.
    "POPULAR" KATIE EMMETT In Con T. Murphy's Latest Depiction of Irish Life, "KILLARNEY."
    DIRECT FROM THE STAR THEATER, NEW YORK.
    —THE CAST—
    Frazer Coulter, Thaddeus Shine, Geo. C Boniface, Hubert Sackett, Robert McNair, Harry Leighton, Grace Thorne, Katie Bettenau, Anne Haines, Eliza Hudson."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), May 6, 1897, Morning, p. 6, col. 1.
    "…; William H. Sackett and Margaret Wertman, of Scranton; … were granted marriage licenses yesterday by Clerk of the Courts Thomas."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), September 13, 1897, Morning, p. 5, col. 3.
    "TROOPS ARE IN CHARGE
    Three Thousand Members of the Guard Preserving Order. [in a violent labor dispute]
    Hazleton, Pa., Sept. 13.—The region is now in complete subservience to the National Guard of Pennsylvania, the entire Third brigade of which is here.

    THE CAMP BAGGAGE.
    Was Being Packed for Shipment at Armory Yesterday.
    Quartermaster Sergeant Watklns, with a detail composed of …; Privates S. E. Sackett, Company B; … were busily engaged yesterday at the Armory getting out the camp equipments of the Thirteenth regiment."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), December 9, 1897, p. 10, col. 2.
    "NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA
    HALLSTEAD.
    Brakeman Harvey Sackett had the thumb on his left hand badly injured while coupling cars in the yard here Monday night."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), July 30, 1898, p. 6, col. 2.
    "COMPANY A IS NOW IN THE NEW GUARD
    Major Simon B. Cameron, of Marietta, last night mustered in Company A of the provisional National Guard. The same office was to have been performed with Company B but the organization lacked the required number of men and will be mustered in later.

    MEMBERS OF B.
    Following are the names: …, Samuel Sackett, …."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), August 4, 1898, p. 8, col. 1.
    "[Report from] Camp Alger, Dunn Loring, Aug. 3.

    Privates …, George Sackett and …, of Company C, leave for home tomorrow for a week's furlough."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), August 13, 1898, p. 10, col. 2.
    "[Report from] Camp Alger, Dunn Loring, Va., Aug. 12.
    CAMP GOSSIP.
    Privates …, George Sackett, of C., returned to camp late last night. They all had a good time home."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), November 18, 1898, Morning, p. 1, col. 5.
    "FRATERNAL CONGRESS
    The Members Meet at Philadelphia and Elect Officers.
    Baltimore, Nov. 17.—The national fraternal congress in session here this afternoon elected officers for the coming year. …
    Mr. M. W. Sackett, of Meadville, Pa., was re-elected secretary and treasurer."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), January 11, 1899, Morning, p. 3, col. 2.
    "CASES HEARD IN SUPERIOR COURT

    Other cases were disposed of as follows:

    Discontinued—Commonwealth ex. rel., Anna Sackett against William W. Sackett, appellant, common pleas, Luzerne County."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), February 13, 1899, Morning, p. 8, col. 3.
    "[Report from] Camp MacKenzie, Augusta., Ga., Feb. 12 [including] Members of the Thirteenth Who Have Recently Been Admitted to the Hospital.

    Privates Obed A. Michaels and George Sackett, of Company C, have been taken to the division hospital. The former is suffering from a case of grippe, and the latter from jaundice. Neither case is serious, and it is expected that they both will be all right in a few days. …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), March 30, 1899, Morning, p. 5, col. 1.
    "PERSONAL
    Miss Ethel Hitchcock entertained a number of her friends in honor of her ninth birthday Tuesday afternoon at her home. Mrs Hitchcock was assisted in receiving by …, and Herman Sacket."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), April 19, 1899, Morning, p. 3, col. 1.
    "APPOINTMENTS OF THE CONFERENCE
    [Long list of appointments made by "bishop and presiding elders" at] The Wyoming conference [which] closed its sessions at Kingston yesterday.

    Oneonta District

    Bainbridge..........C. H. Sackett
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), April 19, 1899, Morning, p. 3, col. 3.
    "OFFICERS OF THE COMMISSION
    That in addition to these general officers just named the commission shall consist of the following:

    Oneonta District—The presiding elder, chairman; Rev H. C. McDermott, Rev. C. H. Sackett, Mr George I. Wilber, Mr. Howard Sherman.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), April 22, 1899, Morning, p. 2, col. 2.
    "LANGSTAFF-KELLY CONTEST.
    Witnesses from Lackawanna Township and Carbondale City.
    The following witnesses were yesterday examined in the Langstaff-Kelly contest:
    Lackawanna township, West district— … Alfred Sackett, …."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), November 15, 1899, Morning, p. 1, col. 2.
    "RHODE ISLAND DAY.
    Distinguished Delegation at Export Exposition.
    Philadelphia, Nov. 14.—Rhode Island day at the National Export exposition brought a distinguished delegation from that state today, headed by Governor Elisha Dyer, who is accompanied bv his wife. The partv which arrived last night included, in addition to Governor and Mrs. Dyer: Adjutant General M. S. Sackett, …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), November 17, 1899, Morning, p. 9, col. 5.
    "BUSINESS CHANCES
    The Security Savings Society, Security Building, Chicago, offers a limited number of new subscribers the chance of a lifetime to obtain the best investment for idle funds ever known. … There is no other investment that will pay you THREE PER CENT. PER WEEK steadily the year round, where your funds are absolutely SAFE and GUARANTEED against LOSS and where you can withdraw your funds at any time on demand …
    Among the hundreds of letters we have received in answer to [a circular letter:]
    [About 15 letters published, including:]
    I have no complaint to make whatever and have been treated like a perfect gentleman by you. J. H. SACKETT. 425 Prospect street, Cleveland, O., Aug. 17th, 1899."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), November 27, 1899, Morning, p. 1, col. 1–2.
    "ZAMBOANGA HAS SURRENDERED
    Revolution on That Island Is Effectually Crushed.
    END OF WAR SEEMS NEAR
    Admiral Watson Cables That One of the Most Important Provinces of the Philippines Has Unconditionally Submitted to American Sovereignty—The Second Largest Island in the Group Will Soon Be Completely Under American Control.

    The Filipinos took the American prisoners from Victoria to San Carlos. On the walls of the Victoria prison and of the San Carlos convent are the following names: Civilians—…; soldiers—…, George Sackett, …."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), December 26, 1899, p.7, col. 5, repeated February 10, 1900, Morning, p. 2, col. 3.
    "At Piney Ridge.
    The intensely interesting drama, "At Piney Ridge." will be at the Lyceum Wednesday evening next. The story tells of the fortunes of a rich young mountaineer of the Tennessee mountains, who is charged of having the taint of negro blood in his veins on the eve of his marriage to the daughter of a proud southern family. It eventually turns out, however, that an Octoroon had exchanged her child for the child of her master when they were babies. This is the important part of the play, and out of it the author has devised some highly sensational, thrilling and effective scenes.
    The company supporting Mr. Higgins is a powerful one and includes …, Benn Sackett, …."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), March 31, 1900, Morning, p. 2, col. 2.
    "NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA
    SUSQUEHANNA.
    J. M. Sackett, a prominent Great Bend business man, is recovering from a serious illness."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), August 10, 1900, Morning, p. 2, col. 1.
    "NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA
    SUSQUEHANNA COUNTY.
    J. N. Sackett, of Great Bend, aged seventy-two, a few days ago rode a wheel from Great Bend to five miles west of Owego, N. Y."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Indiana Progress, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Wednesday, 14 Nov 1900, p. 6, col. 2. [item repeated for several weeks]
    "The Light of the World" or "Our Saviour in Art."
    "Cost nearly $100,000 to produce. Contains nearly 100 full-page engravings of our Saviour and His Mother by the world's greatest painters. … Mrs. Sackett, our agent in New York, has sold over $1,500 worth of the books in a very short time. The book is printed on velvet-finished paper, beautifully bound in Cardinal Red and gold, and adorned with Golden Roses and Lilies. It is, without doubt, the most beautiful book of this century. …
    The British-American Co., … Washington, D.C."
    [Transcribed from WorldVitalRecords image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), April 13, 1901, p. 1, col. 5.
    [Report of Wyoming conference] "West Pittston, Pa., April 12.—…
    C. H. Sackett presented the report of the board of stewards."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), April 16, 1901, p. 1, col. 5.
    "[Report from] West Pittson, Pa., April 15 [of Wyoming conference]
    After the reading of the minutes, C. H. Sackett read the report of the board of stewards, 58 per cent. of the yearly allowance to superannuated ministers being paid."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), April 16, 1901, p. 8, col. 4.
    "ASSIGNMENTS OF THE CLERGY
    Wyoming District

    Plains—C. H. Sackett.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), June 15, 1901, p. 5, whole page.
    "FORMAL OPENING OF THE NEW ARMORY
    The Most Brilliant Social Event in the History of the City
    The great function with which the Thirteenth Regiment's magnificent armory was formally opened last night is now but a memory, but a memory that will long be sacredly cherished by those who had a part in that brilliant scene.
    It has been many and many a year since Scranton had a military ball. …
    Arrival of Visitors.
    … General Stewart arrived on the 5.24 o'clock train at the Delaware and Hudson station. He was accompanied by the following members of the governor's staff: …, and Colonel William Sackett. …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), July 16, 1901, p. 7, col. 2.
    "NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA
    PITTSTON.
    Edward Sackett has sold his farm in Mountain Valley to his son-in-law, Orvil Broush."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), April 17, 1902, p. 8, col. 1.
    "OPENING OF CONFERENCE [Wyoming conference]
    Stewards—A. W. Cooper, chairman; C. H. Sackett, secretary; …."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), April 22, 1902, p. 5, col. 1.
    "[Report from] Waverly, N. Y., April 21 [of Wyoming Methodist? conference]
    … Rev. C. H. Sackett read the report of the stewards. The total receipts are $7,349.80. Disbursements $7,318, distributed among fifty-five claimants. The stewards then distributed the envelopes.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), May 15, 1902, p. 9, col. 1.
    "HALLSTEAD.
    A number of friends of Miss Ruth Mack made her a very pleasant surprise one day lasy week, it being Miss Ruth's second birthday. Those present were Ruth Ward, Floy Sackett, Herald and Mary Flynn and Ettie Wheaton."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), June 13, 1902, p. 1, col. 3.
    "RIOTING AT PAWTUCKET
    Troops Ordered Out to Control Mobs—Result of Traction Strike
    By Exclusive Wire from The Associated Press.
    Pawtucket, R. I., June 12.—For the first time in the history of the city bayonets in the hands of soldiers ordered out by the governor of the state to suppress riotous disturbances, glistened in the streets of Pawtucket today.
    The astonishlng increase in the number of lawless acts directed against the United Traction company, whose union men have been on strike since June 2 and the inability of the limited police force and deputy sheriffs to suppress rioting induced Governor Kimball to call out the militia.
    Numerous scenes of disorder occurred during the day und more than a score of persons were injured, one fatally.
    In the presence of about 1,000 persons and the militia this evening Adjutant General Sackett read the riot act.
    Tho city was taken possession of by the militia. A provisional regiment was formed composed of companies from the First and Second regiment, with the First battalion of cavalry. In the afternoon orders were issued calling out the Third division of the naval reserves and the machine gun battery.
    [lengthy details omitted]
    There was no further disturbances of a serious nature during the afternoon and everything was quiet during the evening."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Scranton Tribune (Scranton, Pa.), November 20, 1902, p. 9, col. 2.
    Reference to "Rev. Mr. Sackett, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church" conducting a marriage ceremony.
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), January 2, 1915, Night Extra, p. 12, col. 6.
    "Bear Season Closes
    KANE, Pa., Jan. 2.—The last day of the 1914 hunting season proved to be a lucky day for hunters in this region. The Rev. D. J. McHenry, of Sackett, Elk County, succeeded in killing a bear after trailing it for several hours."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), May 21, 1915, Night Extra, p. 4, col. 4.
    "Hebrew Charities' Branches Elect
    The Federation of Hebrew Charities last night elected officers for three of its branches at a meeting held in the Keneseth Israel Synagogue, Broad street and Columbia avenue.

    For the Hebrew Educational Society there were chosen: … and Alexander Sacket.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), June 3, 1915, Final, p. 2, cols. 4–5.
    "PENN STATE GETS PURDUE MAN FOR DEAN
    LAFAYETTE, Ind., June 3.—Prof. R. L. Sackett, who for eight years has been in the School of Civil Engineering at Purdue University, has accepted the position of dean of engineering at Pennsylvania State College, Bellefonte, Pa. Professor Sackett went to Lafayette from Eastham College, Richmond, where he had been professor of applied mathematics and astronomy. He had been consulting engineer for the State Board of Health as an advisory for several years."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger, (Philadelphia [Pa.]), July 23, 1915, Night Extra, p. 10, col. 3.
    "SWIMMERS WILL RACE SATURDAY FOR ASHER AND SACKETT TROPHIES
    Aquatic races will be held at the Philadelphia Swimming Club at Lafayette, Pa., Saturday. …
    Many of the boys are getting ready for the classic of the Schuylkill—the Sackett Cup race, …
    The Sackett Cup competition is looked upon as the blue ribbon event of aquatic sports of the East. The record is held by John Knight Shyrock, the University of Pennsylvania swimmer, who in 1912 swam the century in 1:01 2.5 seconds."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), August 9, 1915, Night Extra, p. 11, col. 5
    "ONE-MILE SWIMMING 'CHAMPS' AT LAFAYETTE
    Philadelphia Club Plans Big Aquatic Carnival for August 21—The Events.
    The Schuylkill River at Lafayette is thronged with swimmers during the weekends, who are practicing for the coming championships scheduled for August 21 at the Philadelphia Swimming Club.
    Since June the boys have been duckin', divin' and chasin' through the waters in preparation for the "champs." The events are: 100 yards for Sackett Cup, ….
    The Sackett Cup event will bring out a coterie of sprinters, for to win one must go the course in better than 1:03½. …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Meadville Tribune Republican, Crawford County, Pennsylvania, Wed, 12 Jan 1916
    "Death of M. W. Sackett"
    "Myron Ward Sackett, one of the oldest and best known citizens of Meadville, passed away Wednesday morning about 7 o'clock at his home on Liberty street. He had been ill for several weeks but had recovered sufficiently during the past two weeks to be out and visit his office, but suffered a relapse recently. The end came peacefully, the direct cause being a cerebral hemorrhage. Mr. Sackett was born in Trumbull county, Ohio, October 24, 1841. He came to Meadville in 1861, arriving by the first train run eastward on the A. & G. W. railroad, now the Erie. He engaged in the clothing business with his half-brother, E. W. Tanner, the firm being known as Sackett & Tanner. In 1869 he went to Pittsburgh where he entered the wholesale crockery business. While there he became interested in the work of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the oldest of the fraternal insurance orders, and to this organization he devoted the remainder of his life, serving as the general secretary or Supreme Recorder for 36 years. During this time Mr. Sackett also served for 12 years as secretary of the National Fraternal Congress, an association of the principal fraternal associations of the United States and Canada. He was recognized as a leader in fraternal insurance work and was widely known throughout the county on account of his long association with the work of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and of the National Fraternal Congress. He returned to Meadville in 1879, and this city has since then been the central office of the A. G. U. W. Mr. Sackett was married August 15, 1866, to Miss Sarah V. Barber, of Meadville, who survives him, together with their five children; Mrs. Seth S. Terry, of Montclair, New Jersey; Mrs. William P. Haines, of Buffalo, New York; Mrs. Walter Irving Bates, of Meadville; Ward M. Sackett, of Corvallis, Montana and Edgar H. Sackett, of Meadville. Two half brothers also survive; E. P. Tanner, of Canfield, and Horace Tanner, of Youngstown. M. W. Sackett was a man of genial and friendly disposition, who had many devoted friends who knew his value and admired his character. He was a devoted husband and father, and outside of the demands of his business most of his interest and pleasure were in his home. His nature was loyal and sincere; simple and natural in his tastes, he was of an independent cast of mind and despised all shams and pretenses. The services were conducted by the Rev. Henry T. Secrist, pastor of the Unitarian church, the church of Mr. Sackett and his family, and were impressive in their simplicity. Reading from the Beatitudes, and a few appropriate selections from familiar poems, Mr. Secrist closed with an earnest prayer. There was no eulogy, no sermon, the well known life of Mr. Sackett and selections that were read harmonizing as a fitting testimonial to his memory; and after the attending friends had departed the family and those remaining with them accompanied the remains to Greendale, where the final rites were conducted and the earthly chapter of an honored and esteemed life was closed."
    [Find A Grave transcript]
  • Meadville Tribune, Crawford County, Pennsylvania, Mon, 17 Jan 1916 "Supreme Recorder Ancient Order United Workman—The Last Obsequies" "Republican of Jan. 17th, we clip the following as to the last obsequies of our deceased brother; In the presence of a very large gathering of friends, including many of the representative business men of the city and a large number from a distance, services in memory of Mr. Myron W. Sackett were held at the residence on Liberty street, at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon, and the interment was made in Greendale cemetery. There were members present from the various Orders to which Mr. Sackett belonged, and from the Chamber of Commerce, the latter attending in a body. The offering of flowers was very large and beautiful. The casket was banked with flowers, largely of roses, and many such tributes were arranged in the adjoining rooms." [Find A Grave transcript]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), February 17, 1917, Night Extra, p. 11, col. 2–3.
    "MISS MARGARET R. HART
    Miss Hart will take part in the [?histoire] gavette with which the [image too dark to read] the receiving line will be Miss Gregory, Mrs. R. W. Campbell and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Sackett."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), February 27, 1917, Night Extra, p. 7, col. 5.
    ""KATINKA" TINKLES WITH TUNE AND FUN
    T. Roy Barnes, Robins and Friml's Score the Best Bets of Lyric's Show
    MELODY WELL CONTRIVED
    KATINKA. Musical play in three acts. Book and lyrics by Otto Hauerbach. Music by Rudof Friml. Management, Arthur Hammerstein. Lyric Theatre.
    Petrov.........Albert Sackett
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), August 18, 1917, Final, p. 11, col. 3.
    "TOMLINSON STARS IN SWIM AT LAFAYETTE
    Captures Sackett Cup in 100 Yards and Lifts Honors in 440 Yards
    LAFAYETTE, Pa., Aug. 18.—Before many enthusiastic swimming fans here today Tomlinson defeated Uhl, the winner of last year's Sackett Cup, in the 100-yard swim, thereby winning the Sackett Cup. This was the twenty-second year the cup has been raced for."
    [William Post Sackett (1856–1946)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), August 27, 1917, Sports Extra, p. 10, col. 6.
    "WEST BRANCH Y.M.C.A. MARATHON SWIM TODAY
    … Tomlinson, who won the Sackett cup two weeks ago at Lafayette …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), September 4, 1917, Final, p. 2, col. 2.
    "U.S. PREPARES POSTERS FOR NEW LIBERTY LOAN

    Other firms awarded contracts for the printing of posters are … and Sackett & Wilhelm Corporation, New York."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), November 10, 1917, Sports Extra, p. 13, col. 5.
    "WINNING SMILE MADE FOOTLIGHT HISTORY
    Two Managers Competed for Julia Sanderson Because She Could "Look Pleasant"
    In "Rambler Rose," the new musical play in which JUlia Sanderson and Joseph Cawthorn are coming to the Forrest Theatre Monday evening—how it's better to smile than to cry—and there isn't any girl in the country to whom such a song could be assigned more appropriately than to Miss Sanderson. …
    In the Forepaugh Stock Company in Philadelphia, of which her father, Albert Sackett, was stage director, Miss Sanderson received her earliest experience. She was just a little girl at the time, but they put her in to play all sorts of parts.
    One night a New York producing manager happened to drop into the theatre. After the first act he asked the man in the boxoffice who the little girl with the smile was.
    "That," said the ticket seller, "Oh, that's Al Sackett's llttle girl. Has a nice smile, hasn't she?"
    "Yes, and I want it." said the manager.
    He saw Mr. Sackett and Julia came to New York to smile in support of Paula Edwardes in "Winsome Winnie" at the Casino. New Yorkers liked her smile just as much as the Phlladelphians had, and the next season they gave her a better part in "A Chinese Honeymoon."" Then she joined De Wolf Hopper's company and then her father thought it would bo good for her to go to London. She went, and her smile got her a part at once in "The Little Duke,"" one of George Edwardes's productions.
    Charles Frohman dropped in to see this piece one night and the first thing he said to Edwardes afterward was, "Who's the little girl with the smile?"
    "Why, you ought to know her," replied Edwardes. "She comes from America."
    "Well, I'm going to take her back," said Mr. Frohman.
    And he did, and put her in "The Dairymaids" first. Then he gave her the leading role in "The Arcadians," and while she was playing in this piece, he got a cable from Edwardes one morning.
    "Hear you've got girl with wonderful smile in 'Arcadians,'" said tho London manager.
    "You had her first, but I'm going to keep her." retorted Frohman.
    After "The Arcadians" she had the leading role in "The Siren" and then Mr. Frohman made her a star in "The Sunshine Girl.""
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), December 15, 1917, Final, p. 7, col. 2.
    "MANY DANCES IN LARGE AFFAIR TODAY
    Knitting the Dansant and Canteen Dance in Brooklyn Will Have Unique Features

    The program girls and chaperons will include: Chaperons, …. Girls— … Miss Beatrice Sackett, …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), February 12, 1918, Night Extra, p. 9, col. 1.
    ""The Art Studio," a miniature musical comedy with an abundance of pretty girls, was also a pleasing feature of the bill [at the Globe], and "The Children of France," a patriotic melodrama, featuring Albert Sackett, scored an emphatic hit. …."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), June 15, 1918, Night Extra, p. 13, col. 6.
    "RECORD ENTRY IN THE FRIDOLYN CUP
    One Hundred and Sixty-four Golfers Playing at Philmont Today
    The third annual golf tournament for the Fridolyn Cup at the Philmont Country Club today has attracted the best entry list in the history of the event …. The pairings follow:
    3:20—Mrs. W. A. Sackett and J. P. Daly, Aronimink, and Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Bowers, Philmont."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), July 25, 1918, Night Extra, p. 11, col. 2.
    "TITULAR SWIMMING MEET
    Two Middle Atlantic Events to Be Decided Tonight at Manheim
    … Besides Marling in the 100-yard championship there are Raymond Uhl, of Lansdowne, who captured this event for two years and who holds the fastest outdoor record for the Sackett Cup over the distance …"
    [William Post Sackett (1856–1946)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), October 2, 1918, Night Extra, p. 11, col. 2.
    "U.S. CASUALTIES ON 3 REPORTS TOTAL 1118
    … Casualties among the American expeditionary forces in France were increased to 1118 by reports given out by the War Department today and last night …
    WOUNDED SEVERELY
    Lieutenants
    SACKETT, DAYTON, Greenfield, Weakley County, Tenn."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), January 10, 1920, Night Extra, p. 2, col. 6.
    "TO WED N.Y. DIVORCEE
    Engagement Announced of W. S. Duell and Mrs. Carroll
    Mrs. Livingston Carroll, of New York, twice divorced, will marry W. Sackett Duell, a Philadelphia manufacturer, on January 21, it has been announced.
    Mrs. Carroll shone in New York and Newport society as "Baby" Best. She was the daughter of Mrs. Clermont Livingston Best, of New York. She married Elizur Yale Smith in 1907 and was divorced the following June. In September, 1910, Mrs. Smith married Arthur Carroll, son of the late General Howard Carroll. She was divorced again five years later.
    Her marriage to Mr. Duell will take place at her apartment in the Hotel Lorraine, New York. The couple will live in the Duell mansion at Meadowbrook. Mr. Duell is an owner of the Klauder-Weldon Dyeing Machine Co. at Jenkintown."
    [William Sackett Duell (1882–) s. Charles Holland & Harriet M (Sackett) Duell]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), July 22, 1920, Night Extra Financial, p. 3, col. 3.
    "MACHINE IS USED FOR PRESCRIPTIONS.
    Physician Turned Out Illegal Orders for Liquor on Mimeograph
    WHOLESALERS IN TROUBLE
    In order to meet the demand for prescriptions for liquor a Philadelphia physician turned them out in mimeograph form, according to R. M. Sackett, state prohibition inspector.
    Mr. Sackett declined to divulge the name of the doctor, who, he said, would be given a hearing in a few days.
    "There is little doubt in my mind," declared Mr. Sackett, "that we have the goods on the physician, judging from the thousands of illegal prescription blanks that the investigation has brought to light.
    "The investigation proves conclusively," remarked the inspector, "that this physician suffered from 'writers' cramp' and resorted to the mimeograph in producing his own prescription blanks."
    Since June 10 the prohibition department has ruled that a physician is limited to writing 100 prescriptions for liquor every three months. The regulation blanks are supplied by the prohibition director's office and a record kept in that office.

    Inspector Sackett left last night for Pittsburgh, where he was summoned by W. W. Hindman, state prohibition director, who returned yesterday from a trip to the coast, to report on the progress of work in Philadelphia. He will return to this city Saturday and resume hearings of wholesalers."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), August 17, 1920, Night Extra, p. 14, col. 8.
    SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS
    … The feature event will be the Middle Atlantic half-mile championship and the twenty-sixth annual 100-yard scratch race for the William P. Sackett trophy. …"
    [William Post Sackett (1856–1946)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), August 21, 1920, Night Extra, p. 9, col. 8.
    "SWIM RACES TODAY
    Sackett Cup and Middle Atlantic Events at Lafayette
    … The feature event will be the middle Atlantic half-mile championship and the twenty-sixth annual 100-yard scratch race for the William P. Sackett Trophy. …"
    [William Post Sackett (1856–1946)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), October 12, 1920, Night Extra, p. 1, col. 3.
    "2 PEARL STRANDS TAKEN FROM MRS. G. H. M'FADDEN, JR.
    Gems Worth $100,000 Vanish From Dressing Table in Villanova Home
    RICH HEIRLOOMS STOLEN FROM MRS. SACKETT DUELL
    Detectives Have Theory of Dishonest Servants or Crooks Having Entree in Society
    Rare family jewels, valued at between $20,000 and $25,000, mysteriously disappeared the night of October 5 from the boudoir of Mrs. William Sackett Duell at Meadowbrook, Pa.
    … The Duell robbery was kept secret for nearly a week because investigators believed it an "inside job."
    Mrs. Duell, whose husband is president of the Klauder-Wilson Dyeing Machine Co., of Jenkintown, wore her jewels at a dinner Monday night, October 4. …"
    [William Sackett Duell (1882–) s. Charles Holland & Harriet M (Sackett) Duell]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), October 14, 1920, Night Extra, p. 3, col. 3.
    "M'FADDEN PEARLS, BURDEN TO THIEVES
    Gems So Well Known by Jewelers They Will Be Hard to Sell
    SIMILAR JOB IN NEW YORK
    … The methods employed in the Sleepy Hollow robbery were the same as those used by the "boudoir thieves" who escaped with the McFadden jewels and those owned by Mrs. William Sackett Duell, of Meadowbrook, Pa. …"
    [William Sackett Duell (1882–) s. Charles Holland & Harriet M (Sackett) Duell]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), October 26, 1920, Night Extra, p. 11, col. 2.
    THE DAILY NOVELETTE
    [A fictional story involving a family of Sacketts]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), November 20, 1920, Night Extra, p. 5, col. 2.
    "DEATHS
    SACKETT.—Nov. 18, after a brief illness, FRANKLIN PAGE SACKETT, aged 45, late commander P. C. U. S. N., husband of Marian Leech and son of Emma L. Paine and late General Frederick M. Sackett, of Providence, R. I. Funeral services at Providence, R. I., Mon., 22d inst., 12 o'clock noon."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), December 13, 1920, Night Extra, p. 11, col. 2.
    THE DAILY NOVELETTE
    [A fictional story involving a Sackett]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), March 1, 1921, Night Extra, p. 2, col. 7.
    "LEONARD THOMAS TO BE WED IN STOTESBURY HOME
    Romance of Clubman and Mrs. Austin T. Sackett Culminates Tomorrow
    Dispatches from Palm Beach to New York today tell of the marriage, to be performed at noon tomorrow, of Leonard M. Thomas, former diplomat and wealthy clubman of New York, to Mrs. Austin Townsend Sackett, of New London and Palm Beach, the ceremony to take place in the ballroom of "El Mirasol," the villa of Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Stotesbury, of this city.
    It is indicated in the dispatches the wedding is the culmination of a romance of Palm Beach, and that even the closest friends of Mr. Thomas did not know, or will not know until they receive an invitation some time today, that the wedding was planned to take place this week.
    Mrs. Joseph E. Widener will be in the select coterie of guests at the wedding. A number of intimate friends of Mr. Thomas, from New York, are also to attend.
    Mrs. Sackett recently was awarded a decree of divorce from Austin Sackett. Before her marriage she was Miss Marie Good, of Brooklyn and Long Island.
    Mr. Thomas was divorced late in 1910 in Paris by Mrs. Blanche Oelrichs Thomas, society poetess and once regarded as "the most beautiful woman in America." In August, 1920, she married John Barrymore, the actor.
    Mr. Thomas has been personally supervising the construction of a $500,000 Spanish villa on the ocean front at Palm Beach, and, it is said, this will be the southern home he and his bride will occupy.
    Mr. Thomas is a son of the late George C. Thomas, of this city."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), March 2, 1921, Night Extra, p. 1, col. 2.
    Mrs Austin Sackett
    Mrs Austin Sackett
    New York society woman who is reported engaged to Leonard M. Thomas, son of the late George C. Thomas, of this city. It is reported that they will be married at Palm Beach.
    "LEONARD THOMAS IS NOT MARRIED AT PALM BEACH
    Mystery Introduced in Stotesbury Statement No Wedding Is Held
    With statements by Mrs. E. T. Stotesbury that "no wedding took place at El Mirasol," society is wondering if Leonard M. Thomas, New York clubman, and Mrs. Marie Good Sackett, formerly of New London, Conn., but now of Palm Beach, are married—or when they are to be married.
    Conflicting reports have introduced the element of mystery. New York dispatches say Mr. Thomas and Mrs. Sackett were to have been married at noon yesterday at El Mirasol, the Palm Beach home of Mr. and Mrs. Stotesbury. Palm Beach dispatches, as outlined, gave emphatic refutation of any rumor that a marriage ceremony was performed at El Mirasol yesterday.
    Mr. Thomas was off on a fishing trip with Mr. and Mrs. Howard Drayton. Mrs. Sackett could not be located in Palm Beach, yet there was nothing to indicate that Mrs. Sackett was one of the party with Mr. Thomas on the fishing trip.
    Mr. Thomas refused to discuss either the reported marriage or engagement to Mrs. Sackett.
    "I may have a statement to make tomorrow" was all he would say. At any rate, be is personally supervising construction of a $500,000 home on the ocean front at Palm Beach, a home which will rival El Mirasol, the Stotesbury villa.
    Mr. Thomas is a son of the late George C. Thomas, of this city."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), March 30, 1921, Night Extra, p. 3, col. 2.
    "MEDIATOR CHAPEL IS CONSECRATED
    … The Chapel of the Mediator, Fifty-first and Spruce streets, a memorial to George C. Thomas, was consecrated today …
    Leonard M. Thomas, son of the banker whose generosity made possible the building of the chapel, was present with his bride, the former Mrs. Austin Townsend Sackett, of New London. They were married last month in E. T. Stotesbury's Palm Beach villa. It was their first appearance in this city since their wedding."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), April 2, 1921, Night Extra, p. 9, col.
    "Mr. and Mrs. W. Sackett Duell are entertaining Mr. Arthur Sewell, of New York, at their home in Meadowbrook over the weekend."
    [William Sackett Duell (1882–) s. Charles Holland & Harriet M (Sackett) Duell]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), May 21, 1921, Night Extra, p. 1, col. 8
    "Other jewel robberies occurred October 6, 1920, at the home of Mrs. W. Sackett Duell, of Meadowbrook, Pa., where $20,000 of jewels were taken, and October 18, 1920, when gems valued at $90,000 were stolen from the home of A. J. Antelo Devereux at Oreland, Pa."
    [William Sackett Duell (1882–) s. Charles Holland & Harriet M (Sackett) Duell]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), August 20, 1921, Night Extra, p. 11, col. 6.
    "SWIMMERS TO RACE FOR SACKETT CUP
    Many Out-of-Town Mermen Here for Twenty-seventh Annual Event
    The twenty-seventh annual 100-yard open scratch race for the William P. Sackett Cup, the oldest swimming trophy in this country and Canada, will be held at Miquon this afternoon. …"
    [William Post Sackett (1856–1946)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), October 13, 1921, Night Extra, p. 11, col. 2.
    "Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Graves, who have been entertained as the guests of Mr. and Mrs. W Sackett Duell, of Hillcroft, Meadowbrook, have returned to their home in Washington. The wedding of Mr. Duell's brother, Mr. Charles H. Duell, of New York, and Miss Lillian Tucker, daughter of Mrs. Charles A. Hall, of Pasadena, Calif., will take place at Hillcroft, the home of Mr. and Mrs. Duell, on Saturday, October 29."
    [William Sackett Duell (1882–) s. Charles Holland & Harriet M (Sackett) Duell]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), August 19, 1922, Sports Extra, p. 15, col. 8.
    "SACKETT CUP RACE DRAWS BIG FIELD

    The Philadelphia Swimming Club will celebrate Championship Day with half a dozen open races off the clubhouse wharf at Miquon on the Schuylkill this afternoon. All but one of the events are for men.
    The feature race will be the twenty-eighth annual 100-yard free-style dash for the William P. Sackett Cup. …"
    [William Post Sackett (1856–1946)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), October 12, 1922, Night Extra, p. 22, col. 4.
    "DWELLS ON POWER OF WOMAN'S VOTE
    [Report of convention of the State Federation of Pennsylvania Women]
    Mrs. R. L. Sackett, of State College, presented the report of the educational conference; …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), October 30, 1922, Night Extra, p. 10, col. 5.
    "DEAN R. L. SACKETT
    How the Technical College Influences Industry
    The relation of the technical college to industry is an important one not so well understood by the public as it should be, says Dean Sackett, of the Engineering School of Pennsylvania State College, who is spending a year in Philadelphia in the interest of that institution. …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia [Pa.]), December 6, 1922, Night Extra, p. 26, col. 4.
    "TRAINING THE WORKERS
    Industry and Education Figure in Mechanical Engineers' Forum
    … forty-third annual meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.
    R. L. Sackett, dean of engineering, Pennsylvania State College, described schools for apprentices and shop training, and said that more attention should be given to organizing the instruction; …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • Altoona Mirror, Thursday, February 18, 1971
    "Leslie R. Sackett, Altoona, died February 17, 1971. He was born in Coalport, July 30, 1901, a son of Harry and Minnie (Lyle) Sackett ad wed Bertha Diehl in Cumberfland, Maryland on August 28, 1923. His wife survives, with 2 daughters: Mrs Mary Jane Boyer and Mrs Shirley M McFarland; 3 grandchildren; 2 brothers: Earl H, and Clyde C. He was a member of the East End United Methodist Church. He retired July 30, 1969 from Juniata EAM shops after 43 years with the Pennsylvania Railroad. Friends will be received at the Books Funeral Home 2-4 and 7-9 tomorrow."
    [Researched by Ted Smith]
  • Altoona Mirror, 5 Apr 2013
    "Mary Jane Boyer, 87, Bethel Park, formerly of Altoona, died Tuesday, April 2, 2013.was the wife of the late Lawrence G. Boyer Jr.; loving mother of Guy Boyer and Kim (Gary) Schaff; beloved grandmother of Stephanie, Kirsten and Hunter; and sister of Shirley Hosterman. She is also survived by her nephew, Doug McFarland; and two great-grandchildren. Jane was a graduate of the Western Pennsylvania Hospital School of Nursing, where she became a registered nurse. She was a member of the Women's Club of Bethel Park, the Nurses Club of Southwestern Pennsylvania and multiple bridge and card clubs.will be received from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. today at John F. Slater Funeral Home Inc., 4201 Brownsville Road, Brentwood, where a funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 6, 2013."
    [Supplied by Ryan McFarland]

Sources:
"Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers," digital image, Library of Congress (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/).
Website Newspaper Abstracts (http://www.newspaperabstracts.com).
Website World Vital Records (http://www.worldvitalrecords.com), digital image.