England, London

Newspaper Abstracts

94 records

  • Morning Post and Daily Advertiser, London, Friday, August 28, 1789; Issue 5113.
    "DIED.
    Sunday evening, at Northdown, near Margate, Mr. Richard Sackett, a person possessed of great property, the bulk of which descends to Mrs. Tomlin, only daughter of Mr. Peter Cramp, of Domecourt [sic], in the Isle of Thanet."
    [Recorded Oct 2011 by Michael Coomber]
  • The Times, 13 June 1793, p. 1.
    "TO MARGATE.—Safe, pleasant, and expeditious travelling, from the CASTLE and FALCON INN, ALDERSGATE-STREET: MARGATE COACH sets out from the Inn every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday Morning at five o'clock, and arrives at the GEORGE INN, MARGATE, the same evening at five. Returns from thence Sunday, Wednesday, and Friday morning, at four, and arrives in London the same evening at four. Performed by HARRIS and KAY, London, and P. SACKETT and Co. Margate.—For the better accommodation of the Public, the same Coach and Coachman go throughout."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Paul Sackett (1767–1805) s. Paul & Margaret (Wheatley) Sackett]
  • The Times, 5 November 1796, p. 4.
    "FREEHOLD ESTATE, HORNCHURCH, ESSEX.
    By Mr. WINSTANLEY,
    At the White Hart, Hornchurch, on Wednesday, the 16th instant, at 12 o'cloock, in 1 Lot,
    A FREEHOLD MESSUAGE or TENEMENT, Butcher's Shop, Slaughter-house, and Piece of Ground behind the same, situate at Hornchurch, opposite the Place of Sale, in possession of Mr. T. Sackett, on lease for 21 years, from Lady-day, 1794, at 25l. per annum. Also another House …. Particulars may be had at the Place of Sale; the Cock and Bell, Rumford; Angel, Ilford; of Messrs. Phillips and Garnet, Addle-street, Aldermanbury; and of Mr. Winstanley, Patternoster-row."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Thomas Sackett (1766–1817) s. Henry & Martha (Higgs) Sackett]
  • The Times, London, 12 February 1802, p. 3.
    "SHIPWRECK.—On Sunday morning last, between two and three o'clock, one of the Margate hoys belonging to Mr. SACKETT, heavily laden with corn, which was stowed both in the hold and on deck, and thirty passengers on board, besides the crew, consisting of the master and four seamen, was overtaken by the violent gusts of wind, between Birchington and Reculver: the first unshipped her rudder on the sands, when becoming unmanageable, she kept continually shipping the most heavy seas, and was carried by the violence of the surf towards the beach: at this period she kept rolling and pitching, and the crew, to preserve the lives of the passengers, particularly those of the women and children who were on board, barred down the hatchways; shortly after this, the vessel struck on the beach, and tilted, a tremendous sea breaking over her in all directions, which washed nearly the whole of those upon deck overboard: the crew, three in number, and one man, with extreme difficulty and danger reached the land by swimming; but the Captain (who would not quit the wreck till he had rendered every assistance in his power to the distracted people with him) together with twenty-five persons, consisting of men, women, and children, fell victims to the fury of the waves. In the course of Sunday the bodies of nine of the sufferers were thrown upon the shore, and fourteen bodies have been taken out of the cabin of the hoy: had it been day-light it is possible many more lives might have been saved, but the darkness of the night added to the calamity. Among the sufferers are Mr. John Goodhorn, the master, who is supposed to have received a blow on the temples from the boom: Mr. Thornton, carpenter, of Margate, with his wife and son; Mr. Bone, carpenter, of Margate; the wife of Mr. Jacob, of Broadstairs; the widow Crow, of Margate; Mrs Tatnal of Ramsgate; and a servant girl, with a child under her care, with whom she was returning to town. The few who were saved ascended the shrouds; among these was Mr. Knuckle of the library, at Broadstairs.—Nothing could present a more awful spectacle than the repeated arrival at Margate, on Sunday, of various carriages with the bodies of the sufferers from the wreck."
    [Record added July 2010]
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • Morning Post, London, 12 Feb 1802
    [Sackett's Margate hoy shipwreck. Same story as The Times, London]
    [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • The Times, 11 March 1802, p. 1.
    "Margate, Feb. 26, 1802. At a Meeting of Inhabitants holden at the Town Hall this Day, to take into consideration the Circumstances of the Families of the several lamented Persons (23 in the whole) who lost their Lives in the late Wreck of Sackett's Corn Hoy, and the propriety of a Subscription for the Relief of such of those Families as may stand in need of Assistance … [examples cited of orphans, etc.] …. Resolved unanimously, That a Subscription be forthwith opened to raise a Fund for the alleviation of the Distresses of these several Families, and of such others as may have been affected by the same melancholy event, and those cases shall hereafter be made known …." [Amongst the subscribers: Mr. Sackett £10–10s].
    [Repeated 23 March 1802, p. 2, with longer list of subscribers].
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • Morning Chronicle, London, 11 March 1802
    [Fund for families of victims of wreck of Sackett's hoy. Same story as Times of 11 Mar 1802] [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • Morning Post, London, 23 Apr 1804
    "Wanted, a youth of creditable connections, as an Apprentice to a Law Stationer. Every attention will be paid to his moral instruction, and his treatment in all respects will be parental. A premium is expected. Apply to S. Sackett, Law Stationer, Quality Court, Chancery-lane."
    [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • Morning Chronicle, London, 2 July 1806
    "From the London Gazette, July 1.
    Partnerships dissolved.
    John Eve, sen. of Grays, and Thomas Sackett, of Romford, Essex, salesmen—June 24, 1806."
    [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • Morning Post, London, 25 Nov 1806
    "The Countess of Glencairn (says a letter from [_]) has removed from her late residence at [_] House, to her new one at Sackett's Hill; [_] a short time her Ladyship will set out for [_] House, in Middlesex, which, in future, will be her principal residence. Whenever her Ladyship quits the Isle of Thanet, it is a circumstance that will be most sincerely felt and regretted by those who have had the honour and happiness of her friendship, and the enjoyment of her very re-[_] manners and conversation, and an understand-[_] [[_]parable with the name of Erskine."
    [_ page folded]
    [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • Morning Post, London, 31 July 1807
    "To be lett [sic] for the Season, or till Midsummer next, the elegant Marine Villa called Sackett's Hill, two miles from Ramsgate, the same from Margate, commanding a noble view. The House is replete with every convenience, has five sitting rooms, with bed chambers in proportion, stabling for six horses, excellent garden, with farm yard, to be had with or without some acres of land. Inquire of Mr. Bates, Welbeck-street, Cavendish-square; or at No. 3, Three Church-field-place, Margate."
    [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • Morning Chronicle, London, 30 July 1808
    "CAPITAL HOTEL for SALE at Ramsgate.—
    To be Sold by Auction, without reserve, on the Premises, on Monday next, at 12 o'clock at noon precisely, three undivided fourth parts of all that truly valuable freehold estate, called the Old King's Head Inn, situate the South side of Harbour-street, Ramsgate, next the Harbour, and now in the occupation of Mrs. Hannah Sackett, widow of the late Owner thereof.—N.B. the superior situation of these Premises, and their contiguity to Ramsgate Pier, has always given them a decided preference over the other Hotels there. Possession may be had on the first day of December next.—For particulars apply to Mr. Boys, Solicitor, Margate; or to Mr. Daniel, Solicitor, Ramsgate."
    [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • Morning Post, London, 30 July 1808
    "CAPITAL HOTEL for SALE at Ramsgate.—"
    [Same advertisment as Morning Chronicle, 30 July 1808]
    [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • Morning Chronicle, London, 30 Nov 1808
    "Bankrupts.
    Hannah Sackett, late of Ramsgate, innkeeper, December 3, 13, and January 10, at eleven, at Guildhall. Attornies, Messrs. Berridges, Hatton-garden."
    [Repeated in Morning Post, London, 30 Nov 1808; Stamford Mercury, Lincolnshire, 2 Dec 1808; Oxford Journal, Oxfordshire, 3 Dec 1808; Northampton Mercury, Northamptonshire, 3 Dec 1808; The Examiner, London, 4 Dec 1808; Leeds Intelligencer, Yorkshire, 5 Dec 1808; Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette, Somerset, 5 Dec 1808; Hereford Journal, Herefordshire, 7 Dec 1808; Bury and Norwich Post, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, 7 Dec 1808] [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • Morning Post, London, 30 Nov 1808
    "Bankrupts.
    Hannah Sackett….
    [Same as Morning Chronicle, London, 30 Nov 1808] [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • The Examiner, London, 4 Dec 1808
    "Bankrupts.
    Hannah Sackett….
    [Same as Morning Chronicle, London, 30 Nov 1808] [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • Morning Chronicle, London, 9 Jan 1809
    "Meetings of Creditors at Guildhall. To-morrow. … H. Sackett, Ramsgate, innkeeper."
    [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • The Times, 10 January 1809, p. 3.
    Listed in "Meetings of Creditors at Guildhall, this day, Jan. 10." was "H. Sackett, Ramsgate, innkeeper".
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • Morning Post, London, 4 Oct 1809
    To be Lett, a First Floor, Unfurnished, with Kitchen, and other conveneiences, at S. Sackett's, Law Stationer, No. 8, Quality-court, Chancery-lane."
    [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • Morning Post, London, 22 Nov 1809
    "Dividends. … Dec 12, H. Sackett, Ramsgate, innkeeper, at eleven, at Guildhall, London."
    [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • Morning Post, London, 11 Dec 1809
    "Meeting of Creditors at Guildhall. Dividends. … H. Sackett, Ramsgate, innkeeper."
    [FindMyPast, British Newspapers Collection. Digital image. Researched by Chris Sackett, Nov 2014.]
  • The Times, 27 April 1814, p. 1.
    "A Gentleman may be accommodated with BOARD and LODGING in a very respectable Family, in the immediate neighbourhood of Finsbury-square, where there are no other boarders; terms three guineas per week. For cards of address apply to Mrs. Sackett, No [?], Wilson-street, Finsbury-square."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 30 January 1815, p. 2.
    "From French Papers, Paris, Jan. 25.—Calais, Jan. 22.—The 19th inst. on the application of Mr. Fector Minett, of Dover, one Crowker was arrrested here, who had been principal clerk to Messrs. Sackett and Co. bankers at Margate. This man had carried off to the amount of 36,000l. in Isle of Thanet bank notes, besides a quantity which were still unsigned. He was arrested at the Kingston Hotel, and immediately gave up to the officers of police almost all the property. His wife was arrested in England at the moment when she was about to join her husband. His breach of trust is ascribed to stock jobbing."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 23 October 1815, p. 3.
    "DOVER SESSIONS, Wednesday, Oct. 18.
    THE KING V. CROAKER.
    This was an indictment against John Croaker, for having feloniously embezzled 3,000l. in Exchequer Bills from John Sackett, late banker at Margate, with whom he lived as clerk. John Sackett deposed, that he was a banker at Margate, that the prisoner at the bar lived as clerk with him three and a-half years, and as such was accustomed to receive bills of exchange continually, as well as other property. Witness recollected the two bills in question, the one of 2,000l. and the other of 1,000l. having been in his possession, and coming from Messrs. Reyner and Co. as a payment of a deposit for some advances made: but never authorised any person whatever to part with them. When witness returned to Margate, in consequence of information he had received of the state of his affairs, he found the prisoner had absconded, and shortly after received the letter mentioned from him, dated Dover, 17th January, 1815. Philip Griffith, a partner of a house in London, discounted the two bills of 2,000l. and 1,000l. in question, in pursuance of a letter received from Mr. Croaker, the prisoner, dated 18th June, 1814, in which he took upon himself the responsibility. Mr. Sackett being re-examined, proved the entry of the prisoner in the waste book of the three 1000l. bank notes received from Messrs. Griffiths and Co. on the creditor side of the book, thereby making witness debtor. When asked respecting this money, the prisoner replied that a friend had lent him the money.
    The prisoner addressed the Court on his own behalf. He said he was instructed to confine himself to the two Bills of Exchange in question. At the time he said the instalments on the Stock purchased by Mr. Sackett were coming due, he was requested by that Gentleman to make provision for the payment of it and to write to Messrs. Rayner and Co. for Bills of Exchange, not taking money from them, as at that time it was so scarce. A week's notice waas given, and at the expiration of the time, the bills were received. These bills he sent to Messrs. Griffiths and Co. and he conceived it was a liberty he might take, because they had been largely accommodated by Mr. Sackett. It was a private transaction, conducted in his own name, because it was considered disreputable for bankers to require discounts on bills. The money was returned, and what was done with it? Why, credit was given to him for it, and the money was immediately remitted to Messrs. Roberts and Co. The cash was not drawn upon, but remained until the 11th of August, when it was required to pay one of the bills of Messrs. Rayner, which would fall due in a few days, but by some accident altogether, 800l. being transmitted a day or two afterwards. This was a plain statement of the facts and he humbly hoped the Court would exculpate him. As Mr. Sackett's memory was so very frail, he must throw himself entirely on the mercy of the Court. The Jury having retired for about a quarter of an hour, returned a verdict of Guilty.
    Before sentence was passed upon the prisoner, he addressed a few words to the Court, respecting certain promises made to him by the officer who apprehended him at Calais, and after having landed in England that he should never be put in the situation he was now in, if all the money and papers were given up. He did do so, but the promises were not fulfilled, and he was now brought into these misfortunes, although he had fulfilled his part of the engagement, in delivering up the 1100l. and in owning the Bills of Exchange to belong to Mr. Sackett, before the Magistrates. The Recorder in passing sentence, observed, that the conduct of the Master in this case was not to be enquired into, and the protection the country afforded, required that any breach of confidence should be punished with severity. However disreputable the promises made, might be, it was the duty of the parties to prosecute; it was a duty they owed to their country, and most likely if they had not prosecuted, they would have been prosecuted in their turn, for not prosecuting. The Legislature directed that for this sort of misdemeaner, 14 years transportation should be the punishment, and he conceived, that the extent of the crime in this case, as well as its intricacy, proved that artfulness was not wanting in the prisoner. Under all the circumstances of the case, however, the Court had thought proper to adjudge, that the sentence should be, 'that you be transported beyond the sea to New South Wales, or as the Privy Council will direct, for the term of seven years.'"
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 18 September 1816, p. 3.
    Sudden death of Mr. Wellard at Sackett's-hill.
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 9 August 1817, p. 3.
    "KENT SUMMER ASSIZES
    MAIDSTONE, Aug. 7.
    Special Juries.
    THE KING V. JOHN BOYS AND STEPHEN SACKETT CHANCELLOR.
    This was an indictment against the defendants for publishing a most disgusting libel, of and concerning a gentleman named Taylor, by writing in paint, against the walls of his house, certain inscriptions, imputing to him the crime of perjury, and other atrocious offences."
    [There followed a lengthy court report in which Stephen Sackett Chancellor was described as "an inhabitant of Margate, a baker by trade, and collector of tolls for Margate Pier." Chancellor was suspected of the libel "in consequence of his [Taylor's] having detected Chancellor in selling light bread to the Sea-Bathing Infirmary at Margate." … "Copies of the libels were produced, but they were so disgusting and abominable in their contents, that they were handed to the jury without being publicly read." During the trial, the defence lawyer, after stating "the improbability that the defendants could be guilty of composing the indecent and abominable libels, … both being men of the highest character and honour," revealed that "the real author of these indecent publications had discovered himself" to the authorities. Chancellor was found not guilty.]
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 28 August 1817, p. 1.
    "Free Admission for Covent-Garden Theatre for the approaching Season to be sold for nine guineas. Apply to Mr. Sackett, Quality court, Chancery-lane: all letters to be post paid."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Stephen Sackett (1779–1820) s. Paul & Alice (Reynolds) Sackett]
  • The Times, 5 October 1818, p. 1.
    "LAW.—WANTED, by a young MAN, who has served an apprenticeship to a Law Stationer, a SITUATION as ENGROSSING and COPYING CLERK in the Office of a respectable solicitor in town. Letters addressed, post paid, to E.D., Mr. Sackett's, law-stationer, 8, Quality-court, Chancery-lane."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Stephen Sackett (1779–1820) s. Paul & Alice (Reynolds) Sackett]
  • The Times, 14 October 1818, p. 1.
    Similar advertisement to "LAW.—WANTED" of 5 October, except replies to "M.D., Mr. Sackett's, …"
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Stephen Sackett (1779–1820) s. Paul & Alice (Reynolds) Sackett]
  • The Times, 21 July 1819, p. 1, repeated 22 July, p. 1..
    "RAMSGATE.—MARINE BOARDING-HOUSE (late Mrs. Witherden)—S. SACKETT having taken the whole of the above valuable Establishment, begs to assure those Ladies and Gentlemen who may honour him with their favours, that he has made arrangements for conducting the Boarding Establishment on a plan which he flatters himself will be found to ensure every degree of domestic comfort and liberal treatment, and he hopes the attention which he feels he may venture to offer will ensure him a continuance of the favours which were so liberally enjoyed by the late proprietor. Families may be accommodated with private sitting-rooms having good sea views."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Samuel Sackett (1793–1855) s. Paul & Hannah (Bloxham) Sackett]
  • The Times, 18 September 1819, p. 1.
    "COOK.—WANTED, for a Family, between 3 and 4 miles from town, a good PLAIN COOK, who must also take the care of a small dairy. Apply, if by letter, post paid, to Mr. Sackett, stationer, Quality-court, Chancery-lane."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Stephen Sackett (1779–1820) s. Paul & Alice (Reynolds) Sackett]
  • The Times, 17 July 1820, p. 2.
    "List of Bankrupts includes—
    T. Sackett, Bermondsey-wall, Bermondsey, shipwright, July 22, 29, Aug. 26, at Guildhall: solicitor, Mr. Ingold, Jamaica-row, Bermondsey."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Thomas Sackett (1754–1831) s. William & Elizabeth (Dawson) Sackett]
  • The Times, 16 September 1820, p. 4.
    "Sales by Auction
    To Shipwrights, Barge and Lighter Builders, Wharfingers and Others.—By Mr. Preston, at the Auction-mart, on Friday, Sept. 23, at 12, by direction of the Assignees of Mr. Thomas Sackett, a bankrupt.
    DESIRABLE Water-side Premises, most advantageously siuate near Mill-stairs, Bermondsey-wall, opposite to the new entrance to the London-docks, comprising a wharf of about 70 feet frontage, with excellent ways, warehouses, dwelling-houses, timber yards, saw-pits, shed, &c., in the occupation of Mr. Sackett and others, held for a long term at a low rent: also a valuable Estate adjoining, in the occupation of Mr. Moffat, barge-builder, and others, on lease granted to Mr. Joseph Smith, comprising extensive wharf and ways, dwelling-house, substantial buildings, &c.; held from Midsummer, 1817, for 34 years and a quarter, for two lives, both much advanced, and after their decease, at a pepper-corn. May be viewed; particulars to be had on the premises; of Messrs. Drew and Sons, solicitors, Bermondsey-street; at the Auction-mart; and of the auctioneer, Rotherhithe."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Thomas Sackett (1754–1831) s. William & Elizabeth (Dawson) Sackett]
  • The Times, 21 March 1821, p. 4.
    Listed in the 'From the London Gazette' column
    "DIVIDENDS
    April 21, T. Sackett, Bermondsey, shipwright."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Thomas Sackett (1754–1831) s. William & Elizabeth (Dawson) Sackett]
  • The Times, 14 July 1821, p. 3.
    "LAW REPORT
    This was an action for assault and false imprisonment. … The circumstances were these:—Mr. Richardson [the plaintiff], a young man of some fortune, … was travelling to London … when his post-chaise was stopped by the defendant, Mr. Sackett. Sackett, who was a sheriff's officer, produced a writ for 500l., and arrested Mr. Richardson. Mr. Richardson, knowing that he did not owe 5l. in the world, desired to see the writ, and the writ being shown, it turned out to be a writ against William Richardson. … Mr. Richardson said, "My name is William John Richardson; I know nothing of this debt; … and you have got the wrong man." Sackett replied that he had got the right man and that, at his peril, he would keep him. Under the circumstances, finding remonstrance useless, the plaintiff suffered himself to be carried to Mr. Sackett's lock-up house. … [Mr. Richardson was detained for three days while the authorities tried, unsuccessfully, to find the parties named on the writ as the issuers. It became clear that] no doubt the writ had been fraudulently sued out. Declarations were admitted on the part of the plaintiff, that he suspected a particular individual (an attorney) to have been the author of the fraud. … [The Court considered arguments concerning an arrest of "the wrong man", but it was clear that Mr. Sackett had not arrested the wrong man. He had arrested the right man and this was evidenced by the plaintiff's own statement that he suspected the perpetrator of the fraud.] … The jury, after a few minutes' deliberation, found a verdict for the defendants."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 24 June 1822, p. 2.
    "DIVIDEND
    July 16, T. Sackett, Bermondsey, ship-wright."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Thomas Sackett (1754–1831) s. William & Elizabeth (Dawson) Sackett]
  • The Times, 14 May 1823, p. 1.
    "MARINE BOARDING HOUSE Ramsgate.—S. SACKETT begs respectfully to acknowledge the numerous favours received last season, and to announce to his friends and the public, that his establishment is now OPEN for their reception. Attention has been paid to the improvement of the house, and he solicits a continuance of that patronage, which, he is proud to say, has been liberally bestowed on his exertions to render his establishment worthy their notice."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 10 July 1826, p. 2.
    Advertisement offering accommodation to lawyer, using address "Messrs. Sackett & Ruscoe, law stationers, Quality-court, Chancery-lane."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 17 September 1827, p. 3.
    "OLD BAILEY Saturday, Sep. 15
    HIGHWAY ROBBERY
    Thomas Sackett was indicted for stealing from the person of Mr. James Sharp a pocket-book, containing bills of exchange and other securities to the value of 1,000l.
    Mr. Sharp stated that he was clerk to Messrs. Hankey and Co. the bankers. On the day stated in the indictment, about four o’clock in the afternoon, he was passing through Copthall-court, going towards Bell-alley, when he was hustled by a number of persons, who tore his coat open and robbed him of his pocket–book, containing the above property. He could not identify the prisoner as one of the party.
    Mr. Thomas Edwards, a member of the Stock-Exchange, stated, that he saw the prisoner among the persons who were actively engaged in hustling Mr. Sharp, and hearing from him that he had been robbed, he went after the prisoner, who was walking away at a very quick pace. He seized him, and de-tained him until the arrival of an officer. Two other men, who were with the prisoner, succeeded in effecting their escape.
    Mr. C. Clarke stated that he saw the prisoner among the persons who hustled the prosecutor: two of them ran away, but the prisoner was secured by the last witness, and afterwards taken to the Mansion-house.
    Brady, an officer, said he apprehended the prisoner. On searching him he found some silver in his pocket.
    Two witnesses were called to his character, who admitted they knew nothing of him for the last six months.
    The RECORDER summed up the evidence, and the jury, after retiring nearly an hour and a half, returned a verdict of Guilty – Death.
    The RECORDER then ordered him to be called up for judgment: and, in passing sentence, observed that he was induced to do so at that period, because there might, perhaps, be present some of the prisoner’s companions in crime, and he trusted that the awful fate which awaited him might operate as a warning to them. Such was at present the state of the metropolis, that there was no security for property either in houses, warehouses, or when carried about the person: and it was absolutely necessary to make a severe example of those who, in mid-day, and in defiance of the law, and of that security which the public had a right to expect, dared to unite with a desperate gang to assault and rob persons engaged in their lawful business. He could not hold out any hopes of mercy to the unfortunate prisoner, and advised him seriously to prepare for the worst. He then passed on him the sentence of death in the usual form, which the prisoner heard with the most perfect indifference."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Thomas Baker Sackett (c1796–1837) s. Thomas & Rachel (Baker) Sackett]
  • The Times, 17 Nov 1827, p. 2.
    "Court circular.
    At the close of the Privy Council the Recorder of London was admitted, and made his report to the King in Council of the convicts capitally convicted at Justice-hall in the Old Bailey, at the last September sessions, when the following were ordered for execution—Keaton, Smith, Lowe, Powell, and Sackett."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Thomas Baker Sackett (c1796–1837) s. Thomas & Rachel (Baker) Sackett]
  • The Times, 19 Nov 1827, p. 3.
    "THE APPROACHING EXECUTIONS
    The five unhappy men who are ordered for execution on Thursday next, were all convicted at the September sessions. Their names are, John Powell, Thomas Sackett, Charles Smith, John Keaton, and Edward Lowe. [The crimes of these convicted men were not related.] [Report of Powell's conviction omitted.]
    Thomas Sackett was convicted of stealing from the person of Mr. James Sharp, clerk to Messrs. Hankey & Co., the bankers, a pocket-book, containing bills of exchange and other securities of the value of 1,000£. Mr. Sharp was passing through Copthall-court, in the afternoon of the 4th of August last, when he was hustled by a number of persons, among whom was Sackett, who tore his coat open, and robbed him of his pocket-book, containing the above-mentioned property. Upon the prisoner's being convicted, the recorder told him that no hopes of mercy could be held out to him, as it was absolutely necessary to make a severe example of those who, in mid-day, and in defiance of the law, and of the security which the public had a right to expect, dared to unite with a desperate gang to assault and rob persons engaged in their lawful business." [Reports of other convictions omitted].
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Thomas Baker Sackett (c1796–1837) s. Thomas & Rachel (Baker) Sackett]
  • The Times, 22 Nov 1827, p. 3.
    "THOMAS SACKETT
    Last night a respite was received at Newgate for Thomas Sackett who had been ordered for execution this day. It will be recollected that Sackett was convicted of robbing an old gentleman near the Exchange of a pocket-book, containing bills of exchange to a large amount. The Secretary of State has desired it to be distinctly understood that Sackett's life has been spared upon the ground of its having been ascertained, subsequently to his being ordered for execution, that his character up to a recent period had been unimpeached.
    (FROM A CORRESPONDENT.)
    Shortly after two o'clock yesterday, a respite of the execution of this unfortunate man was received by Mr. Wontner, the keeper of Newgate. It will be the recollection of our readers, that the prisoner was tried and convicted in September last, for feloniously assaulting Mr. James Sharpe, a clerk in Messrs. Hankey's banking-house, and taking from his person a pocket-book, containing bills of exchange of the value of 1,200£. Sackett was one of five unfortunate beings ordered for execution this morning, at the last Council. Since that time, the greatest exertions have been made by many respectable persons, to avert the sentence; but they were uniformly told that nothing short of the most satisfactory testimonials to the character of the prisoner during the period immediately previous to his apprehension, could receive any favourable attention. Sackett's friends are most respectably connected, and he has two sisters married to persons of property and good reputation at Colchester. In their great distress, they applied for aid to Mr. Harvey, one of the representatives for that town; and with his accustomed zeal and energy, he immediately undertook to collect and arrange a body of testimony from persons of unimpeachable credit, which was forthwith submitted to the attention of the Marquis of Lansdowne, from whom it received immediate and successful consideration. We understand that Sackett began a life under very favourable circumstances. Having married the daughter of a substantial farmer at Rivenhall in Essex, he hired a large tract of land near Billericay in that county, where he conducted himself with the most exemplary propriety; but farming going ill with him, he left the country in 1823, and came to town, and with the remnant of his property he commenced the trade of a carcass-butcher in the Commercial-road. Shortly after this he lost his wife, and the event proved his downfall; for though it is to be apprehended that even before her decease he had formed some very irregular connexions, he was deterred by her judicious conduct and advice from yielding to their influence. Her death was the dissolution of his domestic comforts and he vainly sought for consolation in the wild and wicked haunts of desperate characters. Still there is reason to believe that Sackett was rather their dupe than their associate; and that the part he took in the daring outrage which had well nigh led to an ignominious death, was not that of an original contriver, but of a dependent auxiliary. We trust that the partial restoration of the property which has already been made, will not serve as a protection to the more hardened culprits, nor be the means of relaxing the efforts of Messrs. Hankey for their detection.
    (From the Essex Herald.)
    Sackett, one of the unfortunate men condemned to suffer on Thursday next, is well known as an inhabitant of this county, having first married the daughter of Mr. Sutton, a farmer, at Rivenhall. The father of Sackett was a calves' salesman to a very great extent, constantly attending Romford-market, and among other persons from town he became acquainted with Mr. Gibbs, an extensive carcass-butcher in Whitechapel, to whom he apprenticed his son, at a time when Joshua Hudson, the noted pugilist, was also under articles to the same person. After work the one led the other to the scenes of which Hudson has since been the frequenter, and Sackett ranks as no mean pugilist. He occupied a farm at Billericay, and has at time been possessed of considerable capital. A few years since he took by descent, owing to some informality, the extensive premises at Witham, occupied by the late Mr. Matthew Bernard Harvey."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Thomas Baker Sackett (c1796–1837) s. Thomas & Rachel (Baker) Sackett]
  • The Times, 23 Nov 1827, p. 3.
    "EXECUTION
    Yesterday morning John Keaton, aged (as stated) 46, but we think his age could not be 40; Edward Lowe, aged 40; John Powell, aged 23; and Charles Smith, aged 21, underwent the extreme penalty of the law at the front of Newgate. [There follows a report of the crimes of the convicted men and a graphic description of their executions].
    The scene altogether was more than usually solemn, and deeply affected all who witnessed the conduct of the men before they were brought out. The throng of spectators was very great.
    Sackett was to have been executed with them, but he was on Wednesday afternoon respited."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Thomas Baker Sackett (c1796–1837) s. Thomas & Rachel (Baker) Sackett]
  • The Times, 24 Nov 1827, p. 3.
    "Letter to the Editor.
    Sir,—I beg leave to acquaint you that the paragraph you copied from the Essex Herald, stating that Joshua Hudson, the noted pugilist, was under articles to me, is incorrect. He never was in my service, nor am I aware that the unfortunate T. Sackett ever had any intercourse or acquaintance with him during his apprenticeship to me. I am, Sir, &c., A. GIBBS. 57, Aldgate High-street, Nov. 23."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Thomas Baker Sackett (c1796–1837) s. Thomas & Rachel (Baker) Sackett]
  • The Times, 3 April 1830, p. 2.
    Advertisement law clerk seeking work, using address "Messrs. Sackett & Ruscoe's, law stationers, Quality-court, Chancery-lane."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The London Gazette, 22 Oct 1830.
    "The Court of Relief of Insolvent Debtors.
    The Matters of the Petitions and Schedules of the Prisoners hereinafter named … are appointed to be heard at the Court-House, in Portugal Street, Lincoln's-Inn-Fields, on Friday 12 November 1830 ….
    Sackett, Vincent Edward (sued and committed by the name of Vincent Sackett), formerly of White's Grounds, Bermondsey, and at the same time of No. 21, Salisbury-lane, Dock-Head, Bermondsey, Fellmonger, and late of No. 21, Salisbury-lane, Dock-Head, Bermondsey, aforesaid, all in the County of Surrey, Journeyman Fellmonger."
    [The Gazette (https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/18737/page/2226). (Researched by Joan Leary)]
  • The Times, 27 October 1831, p. 1.
    Advertisement curate seeking work, using address "Messrs. Sackett & Ruscoe's, law stationers, Quality-court, Chancery-lane."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 31 March 1832, p. 3.
    "The London Hospital Anniversary.—Contributions announced after dinner, on Wednesday, March 28" included "Sackett Tomlin, Esq., Threadneedle-street £31–10s–0d."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 9 April 1832, p. 3.
    "PORTSMOUTH, Saturday.
    (From the Hampshire Telegraph)
    EMIGRATION
    About 100 emigrants [from several parishes in Sussex] arrived here this morning … to embark … for Canada. … These emigrants go out under the protection of the venerable Earl of Egremont, who gives a free passage to all from those parishes wherein he is a large landowner … [and] immediate employment to them on their arrival at their destination, York. … The whole of the arrangements are under the directions of the Rev. Thomas Sackett, rector of Petworth, who is at the head of Lord Egremont's committee, which merits the highest praise for its exertions."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 29 April 1833, p. 1.
    "NOTICE.—In pursuance of an Act of Parliament, made and passed in the 6th year of the reign of His late Majesty George IV, entitled "An Act to amend the laws relating to bankrupts," notice is hereby given, that SACKETT DARBY, late of Ramsgate, in the Isle of Thanet, in the county of Kent, cordwainer, hath by indentures of lease, and release and assignment, bearing date respectively the 18th and 19th days of April inst., CONVEYED and ASSIGNED all his REAL and PERSONAL ESTATE and EFFECTS unto Thomas Elgar, of Ramsgate aforesaid, bricklayer, John Warren, of the town and port of Sandwich, in the said county of Kent, leathercutter, and Elvy John Wildish, of Ramsgate aforesaid, bricklayer, in trust, for the BENEFIT of themselves and all other CREDITORS of the said Sackett Darby who shall execute the said indenture of release and assignment; and that the said Indentures of lease and release and assignment, were respectively executed by the said Sackett Darby on the 19th day of April instant; and that the execution thereof by the said Sackett Darby is attested by Edward Daniel, of Ramsgate aforesaid, attorney at law, and Henry John Edgar Parker, his clerk: and that the said indenture of release and assignment was on the same day after the execution thereof by the said Sackett Darby executed by the said Elvy John Wildish: and that the execution thereof by the said Elvy John Wildish is also attested by the said Edward Daniel and Henry John Edgar Parker: and that the same indenture of release and assignment was on the 24th day of April instant also executed by the said Thomas Elgar and John Warren: and that the execution thereof by the said Thomas Elgar and John Warren is also attested by the said Edward Daniel and Henry John Edgar Parker.—Ramsgate, April 25, 1833."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Sackett Darby (1779– ) s. William & Ann (Sackett) Darby]
  • The London Gazette, 31 Jan 1834.
    "Notice is hereby given, that a meeting of the Creditors of Sackett Darby, late of the parish of Saint Lawrence, and of Ramsgate, in the Isle of Thanet, and County of Kent, Shoe-Maker, an Insolvent Debtor, will be held at the Spread Eagle Inn, Ramsgate aforesaid, on the 20th day of February next, at the hour of Eleven in the Forenoon, to approve of the manner and place at which the real estate of the said Sackett Darby shall be sold by public auction; also to consent to and authorise or dissent from the Assignee of the estate and effects of the said Sackett Darby commencing, prosecuting, or defending any suit or suits at law or in equity, for the recovery of any part of the estate and effects of the said Sackett Darby; or to the compounding, submitting to arbitration any differences or disputes between the Assignee and any person or persons for or on account of or by reason of any matter, cause, or thing whatsoever relating to the estate and effects of the said Sackett Darby."
    [The Gazette (https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/19124/page/203). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 2 October 1835, p. 2.
    "RAMSGATE, Thursday
    The visit of Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Kent and the Princess Victoria to this town continues to give gaiety and animation to it. … the Deputy-Mayor read the following address [not transcribed]. … At about half-past 11 o'clock a general meeting of the inhabitants and visitors of Ramsgate and its vicinity was held at the Town-hall, to receive the answer of the Duchess of Kent, which was read by Mr. Sackett, and received with much cheering. The worthy Deputy stated to the meeting that the deputation had been most warmly received by the Duchess of Kent and the Princess Victoria."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 17 October 1835, p. 2.
    "—Suckett" [probably Sackett (see 2 Oct 1835), in a list of gentlemen who presented an address re Princess Victoria's illness.]
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 8 January 1836, p. 1, repeated 14 Jan.
    Advertisement for St. Peter's School, Ramsgate—"… A prospectus may be had of Mr. Sackett, library, Ramsgate …"
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 26 February 1836, p. 3.
    General Fund for the Relief of the Distressed Irish Clergy. List of contributors included "Mrs. Sackett 10s–0d."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 25 March 1836, p. 1.
    Advertisement, house wanted, using address "Messrs. Sackett & Ruscoe, Quality-court, Chancery-lane."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 29 April 1836, p. 7.
    Law Report citing a note appended to the case of Sackett v. Bassett as a precedent.
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 6 October 1836, p. 1.
    Advertisement using address "Messrs. Sackett & Ruscoe, Quality-court, Chancery-lane."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 7 January 1837, p. 2.
    Notice re Margate Pier and Harbour Company signed by "Stephen Sackett Chancellor, Clerk, By order of the Court of Directors."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 24 May 1837, p. 6.
    "Sackett" listed as a steward at a forthcoming grand dinner to celebrate Princess Victoria's majority birthday.
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 12 December 1837, p. 2.
    Notice re Margate Pier and Harbour Company signed by "Stephen Sackett Chancellor, Clerk."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 13 January 1838, p. 2.
    Subscriptions in aid of Irish Election. List includes "Mr. Sackett 0 10 0."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 19 July 1838, p. 8.
    Sale by auction "The Priory, Blackheath-park.—A delightful detached Residence, suitable for a family of respectability or a first-rate boarding school … late in the occupation of Mr. Sackett …."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 23 July 1838, p. 8.
    Sale by auction "Freeholds, Kent.—By Mr. BULLOCK, at the Mart, on Tuesday, the 31st, at 12, in seven lots, by order of the Executors of Henry Sackett, of Kennington, Esq., deceased.
    SEVEN Freehold Houses at Deptford, let to old tenants, at about £100 per annum, being nos. 37, 38, 39, 56, 57, 58, and 59, Gifrin-street, running from High-street to Church-street, and within 100 yards of the railway terminus. The houses are brick-built each containing eight rooms, four have shop fronts, and the latter forms the corner of Church-street. To be viewed by leave of the tenants, and particulars had of Messrs. Cook and Sanders, 1, New Inn: at the Inns in the vicinity: of Mr. Bullock, Holborn: and at the Auction Mart."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 26 September 1838, p. 3.
    Notice re Margate Pier and Harbour Company signed by "Stephen Sackett Chancellor, Clerk."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 9 March 1839, p. 7.
    "PEAKE AGAINST TOMLIN
    This was a suit respecting the will of Mr. Thomas Belsey, of Fotheringhay, Northampton, who died in August, 1832, a bachelor, aged [32?] and upwards, leaving very considerable property, real and personal. His next of kin by the father's and the mother's side were cousins. The will in question, dated in the July preceding his death, was disputed by Mr. Peake, a legatee under a former will in 1830, and was defended by Mr. Richard Sackett Tomlin, in whose favour it was made. … [The Court] pronounced for the will."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 18 April 1839, p. 2.
    Advertisement using address "Messrs. Sackett & Ruscoe's, No. 3, Quality-court, Chancery-lane."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 13 November 1839, p. 4.
    "Nomination of Sheriffs for the ensuing year in the Court of Exchequer.
    Yesterday being the morrow of St. Martin, according to ancient custom a Privy Council was held in the Court of Exchequer, for the nomination of gentlemen to fill the office of sheriffs for the ensuing year. The Chancellor of the Exchequer (Mr. Baring), attired in his robes of office, presided at the head of the Court. There were also present the Marquis of Normanby, the Lord Chancellor, Lord Denman, Lord Abinger, Lord Chief Justice Tindal, and most of the other Judges. The Court was exceedingly crowded, but the excuses from serving the office were of the usual character, relating entirely to insufficiency of property, holding commissions in the army or navy, filling public situations, or of advanced age.
    After the usual oath in Norman French had been administered to the privy councillors and the Judges, the nomination was proceeded with. The following are the names of those who were nominated by the Lords of the Council in the Court of Exchequer, on the morrow of St. Martin, in the third year of the reign of Her Majesty Queen Victoria, to fill the office of sheriff for the year ensuing:— … NORTHAMPTONSHIRE.—Thomas Alderton Cooke, of Peterborough, Esq.; Frederick W. Vernon Wentworth, of Stokepark, Esq.; and Robert Sackett Tomlins, of Fotheringhay Castle, Esq. …."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Robert Sackett Tomlin (c1790–1868) s. Robert & Sarah (Cramp) Tomlin]
  • The Times, 16 November 1839, p. 4.
    London Gazette.
    Notice of persons nominated for Sheriffs including Robert Sackett Tomlins.
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Robert Sackett Tomlin (c1790–1868) s. Robert & Sarah (Cramp) Tomlin]
  • The Times, 3 August 1840, p. 1.
    Advertisement using address "Messrs. Sackett & Ruscoe's."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 16 September 1840, p. 2.
    Notice about Margate Pier and Harbour signed by Stephen Sackett Chancellor, Clerk.
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 20 May 1841, p. 10.
    Advertisement by tutor looking for students. "Reply to B.B., Sackett and Fuller's Library, Ramsgate."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 13 November 1841, p. 3.
    "Privy Council.—Nomination of Sheriffs for the year ensuing … NORTHAMPTONSHIRE.—Robert Sackett Tomlins, of Fotheringhay Castle, Esq.; Langham Rokely, of Arkingworth, Esq.; and Allen Allicoche Young, of Orlongbury, Esq."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 8 April 1842, p. 16.
    Advertisement for sale of house by auction. Particulars available from "Sackett's Library, Ramsgate", amongst other places.
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 8 July 1842, p. 2.
    Advertisement using address "Messrs. Sackett & Ruscoe's."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 22 August 1842, p. 8.
    Advertisement "VINER'S NEW PERFUMES." List of shops includes Sackett and Fuller, Ramsgate.
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 11 November 1843, p. 2.
    Advertisement using address "Messrs. Sackett & Ruscoe's."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 25 April 1844, p. 2.
    Advertisement using address "Messrs. Sackett & Ruscoe's."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 18 June 1844, p. 1.
    Advertisement using address "Messrs. Sackett & Ruscoe's."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 26 November 1844, p. 3.
    "Sackett Tomlin, Esq." in list of "gentlemen connected with the trade to the East Indies and China" and who were formed into a committee.
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 14 April 1846, p. 5.
    "OPENING OF THE SOUTH-EASTERN RAILWAY TO RAMSGATE.
    Yesterday the continuation of the South-Eastern line of railway was opened from Canterbury to Ramsgate. The directors and their friends left the Bricklayer's Arms station in four carriages at 20 minutes past 11 o'clock a.m., and arrived at Canterbury at 2 p.m. The train shortly left for Ramsgate, and reached the terminus in the parish of St. Lawrence a few minutes after 3 where the directors were met by the Deputy and other local authorities, and ushered with bands of music into the town. At half-past 4 o'clock a public dinner was given at the Albion Hotel to celebrate the occasion, when 120 principal inhabitants of the town and neighbourhood sat down to a very elegant entertainment. Mr. Sackett, the Deputy of Ramsgate, occupied the chair, supported on the right by Mr. Macgregor, chairman of the South-Eastern Railway Company; Sir S.L. Lushington, Lord Torrington, [& 15 other named worthies], &c. After the usual loyal and patriotic toasts, Mr Deputy SACKETT proposed success to the South Eastern Railway, congratulating the company on the completion of the line, and auguring the happiest results to the town from a direct and speedy communication with the metropolis.
    Mr. MACGREGOR, the Chairman of the South-Eastern Railway Company, briefly acknowledged the compliment, …"
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 26 June 1846, p. 5.
    Births. "On the 21st inst. at Yalding, Kent, the wife of Dr. Sackett, of the Priory, Blackheath, of a son, still-born."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [George Samuel Sackett (1799–1893)]
  • The London Gazette, 13 June 1848 "Whereas a petition of John Sackett, formerly of No. 3, Effingham-place, then of No. 10, Liverpool-terrace, then and now of No. 39, High-street, all in Ramsgate, in the county of Kent, Tailor, an insolvent debtor, having been filed in the County Court of Kent, at Ramsgate, and an interim order for protection from process having been given to the said John Sackett, under the provisions of the Statutes in that case made and provided, the said John Sackett is hereby required to appear before the said Court, on the 24th day of June instant, at ten in the forenoon precisely, for his first examination touching his debts, estate, and effects, and to be further dealt with according to the provisions of the said Statutes; and the choice of the creditors' assignees is to take place at the time so appointed. All persons indebted to the said John Sackett, or that may have any of his effects, are not to pay or deliver the same but to Mr. Edward Henry Rickards, the Clerk of the said Court, or to his Deputy Clerk, Mr. Ledowick Anderson Pollock, at his office, at Ramsgate, the Official Assignee of the estate and effects of the said insolvent." [The Gazette (https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/20867/page/2254). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 1 December 1848, p. 7.
    Died. "On the 19th ult. at Counter-hill-terrace, New-cross, after a long and painful illness, Miss Anne Sackett, late of Blackheath."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [Anne Sophia Sackett (1798–1848)]
  • The Times, 11 April 1849, p. 1.
    Margate Pier and Harbour Company advertising for "an efficient BAND, to play upon the Pier Promenade." Signed by Stephen Sackett Chancellor, Clerk.
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 15 October 1849, p. 1.
    Samuel Sackett, Esq. listed as a steward in an advertisement for the 54th anniversary dinner of the Royal Sea Bathing Infirmary to be held at the London Coffeehouse, Ludgate-hill.
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 16 May 1850, p. 9.
    Births. "On the 13th inst., at Dover, the wife of Sackett Hope, Esq., Captain, R.N., of a daughter."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 21 December 1850, p. 6.
    Paris correspondent's letter includes: "The Moniteur publishes a long list of honorary recompenses conferred by the Minister of Marine for acts of self-devotion performed in 1848, 1849, and 1850. Among the British subjects whose names are recorded on the list are—Captain Parker, who obtained a gold medal; Captains James Tatem, Black, and John Cullen, silver medals; William Sackett, John Helliott, and George Thomas Amos (sailors of the English packet Ondine), … silver medals …"
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • The Times, 12 March 1851, p. 3.
    "Notice. At a numerous and respectable MEETING of the Inhabitants of Broadstairs … passed unanimously … 2. That the thanks of this Meeting be conveyed to Sackett Ansell [among eight names], natives of this place, for their skill in managing the life-boat, and for the cool and determined courage which they displayed … in rescuing seven of their fellow-creatures from impending and inevitable destruction. 3. That the public gratitude is due to the eight brave young men who so disinterestedly risked their lives in the human and perilous task of boarding the brig Mary White in so seamanlike and masterly a manner; and that subscriptions be immediately raised as a public testimony of their zeal and intrepid conduct …"
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • Daily Mail, London, Wednesday, 17 June 1896, p. 1, col. 5.
    Ramsgate.—Bed sitting rooms, from 12s. a week.—Mrs. Sackett, 14, Meeting-street, High-street.
    [WorldVitalRecords (http://www.worldvitalrecords.com). (Researched by Chris Sackett, Dec 2011]
  • The London Gazette, 16 Apr 1897.
    "Notice is hereby given that the Partnership formerly subsisting between us the undersigned Edward Sackett and John Sackett carrying on business as Ironmongers at Nos. 17 and 19 Hare-street Woolwich in the county of London under the style or firm of Messrs. E. and J. Sackett has terminated the said Edward Sackett having retired from the firm. The business is now carried on at 17 and 19 Hare-street Woolwich aforesaid under the style or firm of J. Sackett by the said John Sackett alone to whom all sums owing to the late Partnership may be paid and by whom all debts of the late firm will be paid.—Dated this fifth day of April one thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven.
    Edward Sackett.
    John Sackett."
    [The Gazette (https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/26843/page/2170). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
  • Daily Mail, London, Monday, 10 May 1897, p. 6, col. 7.
    "Police Courts.
    Half-Cured Lunatics.
    The danger of discharging lunatics from asylums before their cure has been completed was once more exemplified when William Henry Sackett, a man of strange appearance, was charged at the Thames Police-court with stealing certain books and stationery, the property of Dr. Barnado.
    The evidence of Alfred Cook, the manager of the Edinburgh Castle Coffee Tavern, and that of the police was to the effect that Sackett flung a heavy paving stone through one of the windows, and then took out a bundle of books, which had become thus exposed.
    "A doctor recommended me to read books," said the poor creature, when asked what he had to say. "I saw one that I liked in the window. I only wanted to read it. I did not mean to steal it."
    The prisoner, who had only been discharged from Claybury Asylum two days before committing the offence, was certified by the divisional surgeon to be suffering from delusional insanity.
    He was removed to the workhouse, muttering that one of his ears had been sawn off."
    [WorldVitalRecords (http://www.worldvitalrecords.com). (Researched by Chris Sackett, Dec 2011]
  • Daily Mail, London, Wednesday, 12 January 1898, p. 4, col. 6.
    The World's Press
    Ablaze on his Wheel.
    Frank Taxton of Glenville, while on his bicycle on Saturday, met with a peculiar accident. Through some unaccountable manner two boxes of parlour matches, which he carried in his coat pocket, became ignited while he was rapidly coasting down the Gobbleman hill. Owing to the impetus of the wheel he could not stop, and there was a good-sized blaze in progress when he reached the bottom. A few rods further on was Sackett's Pond. Taxton swerved the wheel to the right, passed through the gateway, and splashed into the pond—fire, wheel, and all. The water did its work well. Barring a scorched side and arm and a ruined suit of clothes he is none the worse for his adventure.—"White Plains Argus."
    [WorldVitalRecords (http://www.worldvitalrecords.com). (Researched by Chris Sackett, Dec 2011]
  • The Times, 22 September 1903, p. 4.
    "DOUBLE BATHING ACCIDENT.—Yesterday afternoon at Broadstairs, a gentleman named A.J. Newman, of the firm of Newman and Sons, tanners, of Kettering, got into dificulties while bathing some little distance from the shore, and Mr. J.D. Marsh, proprietor of the bathing machines, gallantly swam out to his rescue. He reached him and turned him towards the shore, but became exhausted, and both were eventually landed by a boat in a lifeless condition. Artificial respiration was tried for an hour with no avail. Mr. Marsh was well-known in the neighbourhood. Mr. Newman had the reputation of being a good swimmer, but lately had suffered indifferent health. He was captain of the Kettering Wanderers Cricket Club."
    [Times Online (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]
    [James George Marsh, husband of Emma Hogbin]
  • The London Gazette, 3 June 1913.
    "Notice is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us, the undersigned, Edward Gaskell Sackett and Edward Stewart Gordon Sackett, carrying on business as Chartered Accountants, at No. 1, Middle-pavement, Nottingham, under the style or firm of E.G. Sackett and Son, has been dissolved by mutual consent as and from the thirty-first day of May, 1913. Each of them, Edward Gaskell Sackett and Edward Stewart Gordon Sackett, will carry on business in future on his separate account.—Dated the 31st day of May, 1913.
    Ed. G. Sackett.
    E. S. Gordon Sackett."
    [The Gazette (https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/28725/page/3947). (Researched by Chris Sackett)]