Newspaper Abstracts, Indiana

5 records

  • The New Albany Ledger-Standard, Floyd County, Indiana, May 5 1881.
    "The Corydon Democrat compliments Elder Tully, and Mr. O. Sackett, of this city, for their gift to the Christian church of Corydon, of a handsome silver communion service."
    [Transcribed from Newspaper Abstracts by Chris Sackett]
  • The New Albany Ledger-Standard, Floyd County, Indiana, March 25, 1881.
    "Mrs. Geo. E. Sackett is visiting her parents at Charlestown."
    [Transcribed from Newspaper Abstracts by Chris Sackett]
  • The Indianapolis Journal, 4 Feb 1894, p. 2
    "SACKETT HAS A SNAP.
    Having Elooped with the Elkhart Heiress, He Will Live High.
    Special to the Indianapolis Journal.
    ELKHART, Ind., Feb. 3.—No clew has yet been found to the whereabouts of Miss Frances Davenport, the young heiress who eloped from this city with the adventurer, H. Ackley Sackett. The matter has been placed in the hands of Pinkerton detectives, and her aunt, Mrs. J.R. Beardsley, and sister Florence, are in Chicago aiding in the search. Steps have been taken to prevent Sackett getting possession of any of the girl's property, most of which is ready money in the banks here, the estate having recently been settled. Sackett is between thirty-five and forty years old and came originally from Grand Rapids. Those who knew him there say he is a villain of the deepest dye, and bold enough for any enterprise. He is alleged to have boasted at South Bend and Laporte that he would get hold of Miss Davenport's money and have a snap the rest of his life."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Indiana State Sentinel, 7 Feb 1894, p. 8
    "THE ELKHART ELOPERS.
    No Clew to the Runaways—Sackett a Married Man.
    ELKHART, Feb. 4.—Special.—No clew has yet been found to the whereabouts of Miss Frances Davenport, the young heiress who eloped from this city with H. Ackley Sackett. The matter has been placed in the hands of Pinkerton detectives, and her aunt, Mrs. J.R. Beardsley, and sister Florence are in Chicago aiding in the search. Steps have been taken to prevent Sackett getting possession of any of the girl's property, most of which is ready money in the banks here, the estate having recently been settled. Sackett is between thirty-five and forty years of age, and came here originally from Grand Rapids.
    WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 4.—Special.—Harry S. Sackett, who eloped with Florence [sic] Davenport, the daughter of Senator Davenport of Elkhart, Ind., a few days ago, is a Washington man having a wife and three children here.
    The oldest is a daughter twelve years old and the youngest four. He has the reputation of being a fast man here, and left his wife and children three months ago, since which time he has not supported them.
    His wife is now selling peanuts and candy to support herself and children. Steps have been taken by the relatives of the wife to have him arrested and prosecuted for bigamy."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]
  • The Indianapolis Journal, Indiana, 9 Feb 1894, p. 8
    "SHE WAS HYPNOTIZED
    Claim of the Elkhart Heiress Who Eloped with an Adventurer.
    Gov. Matthews Issues a Requisition for Return of H. Ackley Sackett from Topeka, Kan.
    At 7 o'clock last night Governor Matthews issued a requisition on the Governor of the State of Kansas. The document was placed in the hands of Sheriff Crull, of Elkhart county, and will, if honored, entitle him to the possession of H. Ackley Sackett, adventurer and alleged hypnotist, who is under arrest in Topeka. The papers were made out at the office of the Secretary of State last night. The officer shoved them into his satchel and snapped the lock.
    "I am off on a race against time and those Chicago detectives," he sang out, as he left the Statehouse and hastened toward the Union Station. The prisoner whom he expects to take back to Elkhart in a few days is one of the shrewdest adventurers in the country, and is wanted at Elkhart for a particularly bright demonstration of his talent.
    The specific charge against Sackett is fornication, although it is thought that he can be held responsible for other acts of a criminal nature. For two weeks the daily papers have been full of accounts of the sensational elopement of Sackett with Florence [sic] Davenport, the Elkhart heiress, who, it is now claimed, was under a hypnotic influence during her travels with the man. Sackett left Elkhart during the early part of last week and was joined at LaPorte by Miss Davenport two days later. They were located at Topeka, Kan., the first of this week, where Sackett was arrested on the charge of adultery. The operations of the prisoner for two months previous to his arrest were exceedingly rapid. He turned up in Elkhart about two months ago in company with a young woman whom he introduced as his wife. Sackett was an artist. He secured quarters in one of the leading business houses of Elkhart, and created something of a stir by making fine silhouette pictures, which he fashioned with perfect ease. He wore fashionable attire, was good looking, and had a bold, fascinating manner that made him the talk of the town.
    Among those who grew interested in Sackett's dashing ways and his novel art was Miss Frances Davenport, an orphan and an heiress. Miss Davenport is twenty-three years old, a plump, pretty little blonde, and has in her own right a fortune of $40,000. She was prominent in society and belonged to one of the best families in the town. Her parents are both dead, and the little lady ruled the household of older sisters with a high hand. She was the pet and pride of the home. Although Miss Davenport spent a great deal of her time in the establishment where Sackett displayed his art, her name was not coupled with that of the artist by the gossips, and her conduct was not called in question. When Sackett and his alleged wife left Elkhart they went to South Bend, where they remained a few days. In the Davenport home the name of Sackett was not heard, and apparently he had passed out of the mind of the youngest daughter.
    ELOPED WITH SACKETT.
    Last Thursday the young lady disappeared mysteriously, and Elkhart society circles were stirred by a mighty sensation. For twenty-four hours it was not known where the girl had gone. Her uncle, who is president of the First National Bank of Elkhart, began at once to seek for information regarding her, and was not long in learning that she had gone astray. Reports from LaPorte, one of the neighboring towns, revealed information of the missing heiress. She had been seen there with Sackett, who appeared a day or day before her arrival. He had been heard to remark that he was "solid with a forty-thousand dollar heiress," and this fact, coupled with the absence of Miss Davenport, convinced the relatives of the wayward girl that the couple had fled together. The family were in despair, and determined to pursue the couple. Until the first of this week nothing was heard of them.
    On Monday a message came to the president of the Elkhart Bank. It was from the cashier of a Topeka, Kan., bank, and asked as to the credit of Frances Davenport. The Elkhart banker at once recognized the significance of the message, and wired the Topeka bank officials the story of his niece's flight. Instructions were also sent to arrest Hackett [sic], and the following day the sister and an aunt of the erring girl hurried on to Topeka. There they were put into possession of a strange story.
    SAID SHE WAS HYPNOTIZED.
    The young woman asserted that what she had done was through no fault of her own. She was powerless to help herself. She charged that Sackett was the possessor of a strange influence, which she described as hypnotism, and which she said he had exerted over her. She said that from the moment she met Sackett he controlled all her actions. The aunt and sister remained in Topeka but a short time, and then went back to Elkhart, arriving there yesterday. They learned that when Sackett and the girl reached Topeka they were short of funds, and Miss Davenport suggested that they go to one of the banks and secure a draft on the Elkhart bank. The plan was adopted, and the cashier, without a knowledge of the true facts, wired the Elkhart bank simply as a matter of precaution. It is understood that Sackett left his alleged wife at South Bend without money and with naught to console her but a pet dog. The family of Miss Davenport have decided to prosecute Sackett on the fornication charge, the maximum term of imprisonment for which in this State is six months and a fine of $500. The necessary steps for the prosecution were made in the Circuit Court at Elkhart yesterday. Sackett is also wanted in Chicago. It is alleged that he was formerly employed by a bicycle firm in that city and embezzled an extensive sum of money. He has a wife and two children living in Washington, D.C. He left his family abruptly a year ago. The prosecuting attorney of Elkhart county is preparing to introduce the charge of an undue influence through the medium of hypnotism, and it is the belief of the family that Miss Davenport's statement in this particular is true. Sackett is thirty-two years old, and has traveled all over the country making silhouettes and giving sleight-of-hand performances."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Chris Sackett]

Sources:
Website Newspaper Abstracts (http://www.newspaperabstracts.com).
"Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers," digital image, Library of Congress (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/).