Newspaper Abstracts, Florida

100 records

  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), January 5, 1900, p. 1, col. 4.
    "MIMS

    Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Sackett and Miss Sadie Dodd gave a party for the young people of Mims last Friday. Games, music, and a delicious supper furnished entertainment until a late hour, and were greatly enjoyed by all.
    …"
    [Transcriber's note: The F. H. Sackett referenced is probably Fletcher H. Sackett (1871-????); Weygant Ref #12750, Sackett Family Database ID #10654]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), February 23, 1900, p. 1, col. 4.
    "MIMS
    Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Barnett, with Miss Clara Sackett, of Springfield, Mass., arrived Friday afternoon and are visiting at Mr. F. H. Sackett's.
    Mr. and Mrs. Sackett, Mr. and Mrs. Barnett, Miss Clara Sackett and Miss Sadie Dodd left yesterday for Rockledge. From there they will go by steamer to Palm Beach.
    Mr. F. H. Sackett took a merry party to the beach Thursday morning. On Saturday morning their number was enlarged by the addition of Mr. Sackett's friends from Massachusetts. All enjoyed themselves hugely until a blizzard struck them, when they decided that home was preferable to "advantage", the beach."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), April 20, 1900, p. 1, col. 3.
    "LATEST NEWS AND INCIDENTS.
    Matters of Interest That Are Happening Around Town.

    Messrs. Henry Futch and B. A. Norwood killed a bear Tuesday morning near the Sackett place on Banana creek."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), August 10, 1900, p. 1, col. 5.
    "LATEST NEWS AND INCIDENTS.
    Matters of Interest That Are Happening Around Town.

    Mrs. Sackett, of West Palm Beach, was among the passengers on the northbound train Sunday, on her way to Atlanta, Ga., and Asheville, N. C., to spend a couple of months.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), September 07, 1900, p. 5, col. 2.
    "Device For Killing Hyacinths.
    Allen and McRae, of Palatka, inventors and owners of a device for destroying the water hyacinths, have attached one of their machines to the steamer LeReve, and will soon make a test under the supervision of Major Sackett. The machine consists of a barrel about three feet in length, in which are set sixty-four steel knives, two and one-half feet long and four inches apart. As the barrel revolves the knives dip into the water deep enough to pick the plants up and cut them into small pieces."
    [Transcriber's note: The Major Sackett mentioned is probably Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860-1918), #I64960 in the Sackett family database.]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), November 30, 1900, p. 4, col. 4.
    "West Palm Beach.

    Mr. Glenn G. Strohm and mother, Mrs. Sackett, are now occupying their home, the building formerly occupied by Mrs. Moffat.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Weekly Tallahasseean, (Tallahassee, Fla.), January 10, 1901, p. 1, col. 1.
    "JENNINGS GOVERNOR
    Was Inducted into Office Tuesday Last
    Reception at Leon Hotel
    Many Citizens and Soldiers Present from all Sections of State

    On Tuesday at 10 o'clock the parade formed on Monroe street in front of the Capitol, preceded by Grand Marshal R. A. Shine, assisted by Mr. L. A. Perkins, marched down Monroe street, in the following order:
    Pensacola Brass Band.
    Col. Lovell commanding, and his staff, consisting of Lieut. C. S. Fleming, Acting Adjutant; Capt. F. J. Howatt, Quartermaster, and First Lieut. E. E. Philbrick, Assistant Surgeon.
    First Regiment. Florida State Troops, Lieut. Col. J. W. Sackett commanding
    Second Battallion, commanded by Capt. C. B. Parkhill
    …"
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), February 08, 1901, p. 8, col. 4.
    "MIMS

    The Ladies' Aid society was entertained at the Sackett residence Thursday.

    A party consisting of Messrs W. H. and F. H. Sackett, C. T. Ballou and P. L. Kyser left Monday morning by sailboat for few days' fishing at New Smyrna.
    …"
    [Transcriber's note: The F. H. Sackett mentioned is probably the son of Fletcher H. Sackett (1871-????); Weygant Ref #12750, Sackett Family Database ID #10654.]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), March 15, 1901, p. 8, col. 4.
    "MIMS

    F. H. Sackett, Jr., who is attending Stetson university, spent a few days with his parents this week. …"
    [Transcriber's note: The F. H. Sackett, Jr. mentioned is probably the son of Fletcher H. Sackett; Weygant Ref #12750, Sackett Family Database ID #I10654.]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), March 29, 1901, p. 1, col. 2.
    "MIMS.

    The Messrs. Sackett, accompanied by Walter and Will Strahan, left for a trip by sailboat, to Palm Beach, intending to make many stops by the way.
    …"
    [Transcriber's note: The Messr Sackett mentioned is probably the son of Fletcher H. Sackett; Weygant Ref #12750, Sackett Family Database ID #I10654.]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), April 12, 1901, p. 1, col. 2.
    "MIMS
    Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Sackett and Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Sackett departed for their homes in Springfield, Mass., Tuesday. All were sorry to see them go but hope for an early return next fall.
    Messrs. W. H. and F. H. Sackett and Walter Strahan returned from their cruise down the river Monday. They report a pleasant trip. Will Strahan remained at Palm Beach, where he has secured a position."
    [Transcriber's note: The F. H. Sackett mentioned in the first paragraph is probably Fletcher H. Sackett; Weygant Ref #12750, Sackett Family Database ID #I10654. The F. H. Sackett mentioned in the second paragraph is probably the son of the first F. H. Sackett]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), May 31, 1901, pp. 2–3, repeated 7 June & 14 June.
    "NOTICE is hereby given that the following described lands will be sold at public auction on the 1st day of July, 1901, at Titusville in the County of Brevard, or so much thereof as will be necessary to pay the amount due for taxes herein set opposite to the same together with cost of such sale and advertising.

    J W Sackett—Begin 114 feet south of northwest corner of lot 6, run south 544 feet, east 21 chains, northeast to Banana creek, north and west to beginning, and south ½ of southwest ¼. Section: 1; Township S: 22; Range E.: 36; Acres: 78; Amount of Taxes and Costs: 15 67.

    J W Sackett—Lot 9. Section: 7; Township S: 22; Range E.: 37; Acres: 48; Amount of Taxes and Costs: 2 80.
    …"
    [Transcribers note: The J. W. Sackett mentioned is probably Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860-1918), #I64960 in the Sackett family database.]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), June 14, 1901, Part 2, p. 9, col. 2.
    "NOTICE is hereby given that the following described lands will be sold at public auction on the 1st day of July, 1901, at Titusville in the County of Brevard, or so much thereof as will be necessary to pay the amount due for taxes herein set opposite to the same together with cost of such sale and advertising.

    B B Sackett—All Fleming Grant. Section: 18; Township S: 30; Range E.: 38; Acres: 640; Amount of Taxes and Costs: 6 25.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), June 21, 1901, p. 2, col. 2, repeated 28 June.
    "NOTICE is hereby given that the following described lands will be sold at public auction on the 1st day of July, 1901, at Titusville in the County of Brevard, or so much thereof as will be necessary to pay the amount due for taxes herein set opposite to the same together with cost of such sale and advertising.

    E S Quinby--South æ of Acosta Grant, bounded on west by Quinby's plat, east b aurantia Grove and Aurantia addition No. 1, except Sackett Bros.' land. Section: 38; Township S: 20; Range E.: 34/35; Acres: 1306; Amount of Taxes and Costs: 25 51.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star, (Ocala, Fla.), June 27, 1901, p. 3, col. 5.
    "WEST POINT CADETSHIP
    The cadetship was sharply contested for at Palatka by the following young men: Cleveland Johnson, of Lake Butler, S. M. Mathews, of Flemington, R. A. Thomas, Gainesville, Andrew George, Arthur Sackett, St Augustine, W. T. Pound, Gainesville, J. R. Peyton and J. J. Burges, of Lake City, A. W. Smith, of Fernandina, C. S. Tingley, of San Mateo, and W. L. Calhoun of Palatka."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), December 6, 1901, p. 8, col. 3.
    "MIMS

    Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Sackett, of Springfield, Mass., arrived Monday. Their [illegible] friends are glad to welcome them [illegible] at Mims."
    [Transcriber's note: The F. H. Sackett referenced is probably Fletcher H. Sackett (1871-????); Weygant Ref #12750, Sackett Family Database ID #10654]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), December 27, 1901, p. 1, col. 5.
    "BITS OF FACT AND GOSSIP.

    Major Taylor has rented his schooner to Mr. Sackett, of Mims, who left a few days ago with a party of friends for a cruise as far as Palm Beach.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), January 24, 1902, p. 4, col. 2.
    "The sailboat Nemo, Capt. Sackett in command, is again anchored off Jones' dock. Over four weeks ago the Nemo left Mims for Palm Beach, having on board Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Sackett, Mrs. F. A. Strahan, Miss Bernice Strahan, Messrs. F. H. Sackett, Jr., and George Strahan, and Masters Rob and Ray Strahan. The Nemo is a fine craft—not only commodious, but speedy, the distance covered in the first twenty-four hours of sailing being just one hundred miles; later, shallows, oyster beds, etc., coupled with contrary winds, retarded progress. The party report a most enjoyable trip, and all were much pleased with their stay at Palm Beach. January 1st F. H. Sackett, Jr., and George Strahan left the party, returning by rail to DeLand to complete the year at Stetson university."
    [Transcriber's note: The F. H. Sackett referenced is probably Fletcher H. Sackett (1871-????); Weygant Ref #12750, Sackett Family Database ID #10654]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), January 31, 1902, p. 1, col. 3.
    "MIMS

    Mr. F. H. Sackett finished shipping his oranges. The fruit was fine and practically uninjured by the freeze.
    …"
    [Transcriber's note: The F. H. Sackett referenced is probably Fletcher H. Sackett (1871-????); Weygant Ref #12750, Sackett Family Database ID #10654]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), February 7, 1902, p. 1, col. 3.
    "MIMS.

    Mr. F. H. Sackett, with a party of friends, spent several days at the head of the river, duck shooting.
    …"
    [Transcriber's note: The F. H. Sackett mentioned is probably Fletcher H. Sackett (1871-????); Weygant Ref #12750, Sackett Family Database ID #10654.]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), February 28, 1902, p. 1, col. 5.
    "BITS OF FACT AND GOSSIP.

    The Sackett party, of Mims, on the schooner E. M. G., arrived at Daytona last Saturday afternoon after a pleasant trip up through the winding channel of the Hillsborough and Halifax rivers. …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Daytona Gazette-News, (Daytona, Fla.), March 8, 1902, p. 1, col. 5.
    "Lieutenant-Colonel John W. Sackett and Dr. Worley, of St. Augustine, were in Daytona Thursday and were entertained and shown the city by Major C. M. Bingham."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Florida Star (Titusville, Fla.), August 29, 1902, p. 1, col. 3.
    "LATEST NEWS AND INCIDENTS.
    Matters of Interest That Are Happening Around Town.

    Mr. and Mrs. James T. Sanders, of Miami, and Mr. Glenn Strohm and mother, Mrs. Sackett, were passengers on the southbound train Tuesday, and Mr. J. R. Anthony, of West Palm Beach, returned home Wednesday from Indian Springs, Ga.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Daytona Gazette-News (Daytona, Fla.) October 17, 1903, page unk, col. 2.
    "Guy W. Sackett, of St. Augustine, was in Daytona last Sunday, the guest of Geo. S. Adams, at Schmidt's Villa. Mr. Sackett is the son of Col. J. W. Sackett of the First Regiment, Florida State Troops."
    [Guy Woodford Sackett (1865–1984)]
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The New Enterprise, (Madison, Fla.), February 4, 1904, p. unk, col. 5, repeated February 11, 1904.
    "SOUTHERN FARM NOTES.
    TOPICS OF INTEREST TO THE PLANTER, STOCKMAN AND TRUCK GROWER.
    The Granville Tobacco Wilt
    The North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station has issued a special bulletin (No. 188) on "The Granville Tobacco Wilt," the destructive disease which played such havoc in Granville last summer. The authors are Professors F. L. Stevens and W. G. Sackett. All interest tobacco growers should obtain and read the bulletin in full, but for the benefit of the general public we reprint here the general conclusions of Messrs. Stevens and Sacket:
    "The tobacco wilt is a very serious enemy which not only injures the crop, but also depreciates the value of the land affected, insomuch as it prohibits the growing of tobacco in the affected soils.
    "It is a contagious disease spreading largely through the infected soil.
    "There is little hope of restoring land that is once affected. The utmost care should be taken therefore to prevent the spreading of the germ by means of infected tools or by any means.
    "The number of germs should be diminished by cleaning up old fields and by burning all diseased plants in slightly affected fields as soon as they are discovered.
    "The geatest hope for the redemption of the land now affected lies in the development of a variety of tobacco that can resist the disease.""
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star, (Ocala, Fla.), September 12, 1904, p. 1, col. 5.
    "FROM THE FIERY FRONT
    Brilliant Record of the Ocala Rifles on The Sweat-Stained and Historic Fields of Manassas
    Ocala Rifles, Camp No. 1.
    Manassas, Va., Sept 8.
    Your correspondent has been unable to send you any news on account of pressing duties and long and tiresome marches to the front. But today happens to be an idle one and I will fill in the time telling you a thing or two about the boys from Florida in general, and Ocala in particular.
    We came in last Sunday about 6 p. m. after a long and monotonous ride of over thirty hours and were put off about three miles from our camp. We were compelled to walk the entire distance over steep and rocky hills and pitch shelter tents in the inky night without even a lantern. We finally managed to straighten up our street till a semi-decent condition. The next day, or rather most of it, was spent in putting our quarters in good condition, and attending to the commissary supplies.
    We are situated about four miles from the town of Manassas and a half mile from General Frederick Grant's headquarters. The Florida regiment and the First South Carolina are side by side on a beautiful hill, overlooking the Fourteenth New York, and the Sixteenth U. S. infantry on the south, the First Tennessee and the Texas regiment on the north. We are one regiment of the Second brigade. The others are from New York, Tennessee, South Carolina and the regulars. The first division, under General Grant, marched to the front Tuesday morning. They left here about 3 o'clock and met the Browns, under General Bell, at Thoroughfare, Va., where a fierce bloodless battle occured. Both sides claim the victory, but it seems that the Blues, of which the Floridas are among, are the winners. Our battalion was commanded by Major Mathews of Starke and the regiment was commanded by Colonel Sackett of Jacksonville. We leave this morning for a long scouting tour of about fifteen miles, and do not expect to return until tomorrow afternoon. These long marches are telling on the boys, and they are weakening one by one. It is said that on Friday and Saturday we will maintain positions on the outposts of our camp to protect the same from assaults of the Brown army, under General Bell.
    Notes
    The Fourteenth New York is composed of the most clever boys we have had the pleasure to meet. They are very popular with the Florida regiment and spend a great deal of their spare time with us. They are from Brooklyn.
    As an evidence of the popularity of our Captain Nash, he was detailed officer of the day the day after his arrival in Manassas. This is the second time he has served in that capacity since leaving Ocala.
    The evening concerts by the Second Regiment Band of Orlando are grand and the Ocala boys greatly enjoy the melodies. The Orlando boys are fine musicians and are greatly liked by the regiment.
    The Tampa Light Infantry has a pair of alligators as mascots, which in a source of much curiosity and merriment to the natives of "0ld Virginny." They also have a goat on their street, which is a holy terror.
    Private Hampton is clerk under Colonel Sackett at headquarters of the regiment.
    Sergeant Carn will act as quartermaster in the absence of Quartermaster Sergeant Chambers, who goes with the boys to the front today.
    Sergeant Billy Dunn dreamed that he was a colonel the other day. He woke up yesterday morning.
    The entire country from Camp No. 1, to Manassas fairly swarms with street fakirs of all descriptions and the way they catch the unsuspecting and hoodoo the simple ones is some thing monstrous. They hail from Washington and New York and on the strength of it, Manassas has developed from a straggling village of 1000 souls to a prosperous littl city of about 6000 population.
    The Jacksonville Light Infantry, the crack company of Jacksonville, occupies the street next to us on the west, and the clever Miami boys are on the East. It is needless to say that we never lack for a little amusement.
    The editor of the Star will accept the sincere thanks of the Ocala Rifles for a bundle of Stars. We greatly appreciate the kindness.
    "Little Willy" Dodson has been corporal of the guard and E. M. Hendricks, R. R. Hatchell and H. R. Hodges guards for the past forty-eight hours. "Home ain't nothing like this," one may hear them say every hour of the day.
    The regiment mail orderly is the most popular man in the regiment, irrespective of military rank or social standing. He brings stacks of letters from sweathearts, fathers and mothers to the soldier boys three times a day and makes us happy and content.
    (Concluded on Fourth Page)"
    [The "Colonel Sackett" mentioned is Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Daytona Gazette-News (Daytona, Fla.) October 22, 1904, page unk, col. 1.
    "Guy D. Sackett, of Palatka, was (a g)uest of Geo. S. Adams at this [illegible] Sunday."
    [Guy Woodford Sackett (1885–1984)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star (Ocala, Fla.), November 21, 1904, p. 2, col. 1.
    "Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Sackett, accompanied by Mr. Augusta Doon, arrived in Ocala last Friday week. They came from Buckingham Township, Bucks county, Pa., twenty-five miles from Philadelphia. Mrs. Sackett came by rail, while Mr. Sackett and Mr. Doon came with two cars, containing their household goods and stock, consisting of four fine horses, a splendid brood sow and 175 head of chickens, guineas and pigeons. Mr. Sackett, a year or so ago, thought he would prefer a warmer climate than that of Pennsylvania, so came to Florida in the early summer, hunted up Mr. Jos. T Lancaster, who showed him all over the county, and he finally bought the Major Green place, on Orange avenue, and which the family now occupies. Mr. Sackett had a fine farm of 62 acres, from which he annually cut from 60 to 65 tons of hay, which he hauled to Philadelphia and found a ready market at good prices, besides various other products. He is a Mason, has belonged to the order for ten years, and although he lived over four miles from the lodge room only missed four meetings in the ten years, which will give the reader some idea of Mrs. S's. mode of attending to matters of interest. Mr. Sackett is a pleasant gentleman and the Star extends to him, his wife and Mr. Doon a warm welcome to Marion county, and trusts they will never regret coming here."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star, (Ocala, Fla.), December 30, 1904, p. 3, col. 4.
    "Mr. Sackett, the new comer on the Major Green old place, met with quite a serious accident the other day. He was hauling wood, and slipped from the wagon onto the double tree, when one of the horses made a lunge and brought the tree across his legs with a force that paralyzed him for a short time. He is able to be about again."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star, (Ocala, Fla.), January 4, 1905, p. 2, col. 2.
    "THE INAUGURATION
    Governor Broward's Installation Into office at Tallahassee Tuesday
    By Miss Jeffie Bell Staff Correspondent of the Jacksonville Sun.
    Tallahassee Jan. 3—Napoleon B. Broward was inaugurated governor of Florida at Tallahassee today. The city is in holiday attire in honor of the man who started out in life a barefoot boy, and who by force of character has risen to the position of governor.
    To the sound of martial music, the glory and trappings of the military, accompanied by a large escort of state troops, the inaugural procession formed at the governor's mansion at 11 o'clock and proceeded through the streets gay with flags and buntings to the state house where the impressive ceremonies took place.
    Colonel J. W. Sackett, with his staff on horseback headed the procession, followed by the military band and the state troops.
    The mayor and city council, the reception committee, state officials, railroad commissioners, justices of the supreme court, members of the cabinet with their ladies, the governor, Hon. W. S. Jennings and Governor-elect Napoleon B. Broward with Mrs Jennings and Mrs Broward comprised the official procession which was followed by many distinguished citizens in carriages.
    The procession reached the state house shortly before noon. The gubernatorial party cabinet and state officials occupied the platform at the east entrance of the state house.
    At 1215 oclock the oath of office was administered to Governor-elect Broward by Chief Justice J. B. Whitfield.
    Ex-Governor W. S. Jennings then delivered the great seal of the state to the new governor with characteristic remarks.
    Governor Browards inaugural address was in line with his pre-election pledges and was impressively delivered.
    The new governor is self-made, independent and it is believed that he will conduct his administration in the same manner that has characterized all his undertakings.
    In the afternoon Governor Broward reviewed the state troops. From 8:30 to 10:30 the governor and cabinet held a reception in the executive office.
    At 11 the inaugural ball, which is always an event in Florida's society, was held in the hall of the house of representatives."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Pensacola Journal, (Pensacola, Fla.), January 28, 1905, p. 1, col. 5.
    "YELLOW FEVER BREAKS OUT ON CRUISER BOSTON
    One Death on Board the Vessel and Three Officers and Six Men Are Down With Disease at Panama.
    Panama, Republic of Panama, Jan. 27—When the U. S. S. Boston, which has been stationed at Panama for many weeks, returned from a short cruise down the coast yesterday and dropped anchor in the bay, a yellow flag was hoisted at her masthead and the American colors at half-mast, the city of Panama was swept with a feeling of astonishment and alarm.
    It was soon discovered that yellow fever had broken out on the ship, and three officers and six of the men were down with the disease and one Japanese mess attendant had died.
    Dr Carter, in charge of the fever matters on the isthmus, at once made an investigation He found that Paymaster E. P. Sackett, who comes from Rhode Island; Lieutenant William D. Leahy, of Iowa; and Surgeon Otto Kohlhase, the ship's surgeon appointed from South Dakota, were all down with the fever.
    These three officers were brought ashore and taken to Ancon Hospital, the magnificent establishment built by the French on the side of the Ancon Mountain. Here the medical department has a complete equipment for handling fever cases and Mr. Carter, of the Marine Hospital Corps. and a number of expert assistants are in charge.
    Two of the Japanese mess boys who are also down with the disease, and Private Lafferty a marine, were also taken to the same institution.
    This morning two jackies named Penny and Price also developed the fever and were found to be in too dangerous a condition to be moved. They are being treated aboard the Boston.
    When it was learned that the Boston was without a surgeon orders came from the Navy Department at Washington to transfer a surgeon to the ship and Surgeon McCullough at once went aboard and took charge.
    The Boston is lying about three miles out from the city and, as every care had been taken to prevent the disease from breaking out among the crew, the officers are at a loss to understand how the fever reached the ship. It is believe that the mosquitoes, which have been very plentiful in Panama for some weeks, were taken aboard by some shore boat or in the laundry of the officers. Every precaution was used to avoid mosquitoes coming from the water supply. Only distilled water from the ships plant has been in use since the Boston has been in port.
    Commander Nile reported the facts to Washington and every effort is being made to check the fever before it spreads to the entire ships company.
    The cases of the three officers are reported to be very light, and today all the men, removed to Ancon where there is a corps of expert yellow fever nurses, are improving.
    Within the city of Panama the disease is not spreading. The Boston had expected to go for the quarterly target practice in a week and then sail for Northern ports having completed her assigned time in these waters. Another ship was to relieve her."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • Gainesville Daily Sun, (Gainesville, Fla.), February 1, 1905, p. 6, col. 1.
    "NEWS TERSELY TOLD
    Secretary of State Hay has received received a cablegram from Consul General Gudgar at Panama saying that with the exception of Paymaster Sackett, all the yellow fever cases on the United States cruiser Boston were much better and that there have been no new cases."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Banner, (Ocala, Marion County, Fla.), February 3, 1905, p. 2, col. 5.
    "NEWS TERSELY TOLD

    Secretary of State Hay has received a cablegram from Consul General Gudger at Panama saying that with the exception of Paymaster Sackett all the yellow fever cases on the United States cruiser Boston were much better and that there have been no new cases.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The New Enterprise, (Madison, Fla.), February 9, 1905, p. 1, col. 1.
    "Consul General Gudger at Panama cabled the navy department today as follows:
    "Sackett (paymaster) better, Lehey (lieutenant) convalescent. Others improving.""
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • Gainesville Daily Sun, (Gainesville, Fla.), February 28, 1905, p. 1, col. 2.
    "CRUISER BOSTON ARRIVES.
    Battleship Had Several Cases of Yellow Fever on Board at Panama
    San Francisco, Feb 27—The United States cruiser Boston has arrived here from Panama, via Acapulco.
    The Boston left here several months ago, accompanying the other vessels of the Pacific squadron to the southern coast, but was left at Panama by the flagship New York. While there yellow fever broke out on board, causing the death of Dr. Kahlpase, the ship's doctor, and Tom Matsumoto, a Japanese messman.
    After these deaths occured the ship was ordered north and left Panama with the intention of going to Puget sound. All sickness having passed, however, Capt. Mills, in command, decided to put into this port. She has two convalescents on board, a marine and a Japanese messman. Lieutenant Wood and Paymaster F. P. Sackett were left in the hospital at Ancon, Brazil, with yellow fever."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Banner, (Ocala, Marion County, Fla.), March 3, 1905, p. 7, col. 5.
    "CRUISER BOSTON ARRIVES
    Battleship Had Several Cases of Yellow Fever on Board at Panama
    San Francisco, Feb 27,—The United States cruiser Boston has arrived here from Panama via Acapulco.
    The Boston left here several months ago accompanying the other vessels of the Pacific squadron to the southern coast but was left at Panama by the flagship New York. While there yellow fever broke out on board, causing the death of Dr Kahlpase, the ship's doctor, and Tom Matsumoto, a Japanese messman.
    After these deaths occurred the ship was ordered north and left Panama with the intention of going to Puget sound. All sickness having passed, however, Capt Mills, in command decided to put into this port. She has two convalescents on board, a marine and a Japanese messman. Lieutenant Wood and Paymaster F. P. Sackett were left in the hospital at Ancon, Brazil with yellow fever."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Pensacola Journal, (Pensacola, Fla.), March 31, 1905, p. 3, col. 1.
    "BRIEFLY TOLD
    Lieut. and Mrs. F. P. Sackett, of Washington, are in the city, the lieutenant having been ordered to duty here on one of the ships."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Pensacola Journal, (Pensacola, Fla.), April 4, 1905, p. 6, col. 2.
    "PEOPLE and EVENTS

    Paymaster J. L. Sackett of the U. S. S. Kentucky and Mrs. Sackett are at Miss Whiting's, Phone 317.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Weekly True Democrat, (Tallahassee, Fla.), April 14, 1905, p. unk, col. 1.
    "Adjutant-General Foster's committee to apply to the Legislature for a law establishing a permanent camping ground for the State troops consists of himself, Gen. Charles P. Lovell, Col. John W. Sackett, Col. Wm. A. McWilliams and Maj. Eugene S. Matthews. It was provided for at the military convention held at St. Augustine last year, and will doubtless make its presence felt in the Capitol at an early day."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Weekly True Democrat, (Tallahassee, Fla.), August 25, 1905, p. 1, col. 2.
    "MILITARY DEPARTMENT
    Governor Broward under the authority of a recent act or of the Legislature, has appointed the following commission to select a suitable site for a permanent camp:
    From the State Senate—Hon. Louis C. Massey, of Orlando; from the House of Representatives—Hon Eugene S. Matthews, of Starke and Hon. Wm M. Girardeau, of Monticello; from the Florida State Troops—Maj. Gen. J. Clifford R. Foster, Adjutant-General, Brig-Gen. Chas. P. Lovell, Commanding 1st Brigade, Col. Henry Bacon, Surgeon-General, Col. Jno. W. Sackett, Commanding 1st Infantry."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star (Ocala, Fla.), September 19, 1905, p. 5, col. 2.
    "MRS. ALICE T. SACKETT
    Mrs. Alice T. Sackett, wife of Mr. Will Sackett, died this morning about 4 o'clock at her home on Orange avenue, known as the Green place. Mrs. Sackett was born in Helena, Mont., July 19 1869. Mr. and Mrs. Sackett moved to Ocala from Bucks county, Pa., about a year ago for the benefit of Mrs. Sackett's health and located at the present home site. The deceased's health was much improved and she and her devoted husband were hopeful for her entire recovery, but an abscess forming on her brain caused her death. She was truly a good and noble woman and a devoted wife and bore sufferings without a murmer, always cheerful, good natured and with a word of encouragement to all. The body of the deceased has been embalmed by Messrs. Smith and Roberts and will be accompanied tomorrow by her husband to her old home for burial. A short funeral service will be held at the residence tomorrow at 10 a. m., Dr. W. C. Lindsay officiating, to which all friends are invited."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Banner (Ocala, Marion County, Fla.), September 22, 1905, p. 5, col. 2.
    "Death of Mrs. Sackett.
    Mrs. William Sackett, after a long illness, passed peacefully away early Tuesday morning at her home on Orange avenue, near the city. She was thirty-six years of age and had been a sufferer from consumption for a long time.
    Mr. and Mrs. Sackett moved to Ocala from Pennsylvania less than a year ago, hoping that the change would prove beneficial to Mrs. Sackett. She was a splendid character and already during her brief residence here had made many friends who were saddened to learn of her death.
    After a short service at the residence this morning, conducted by Dr. W. C. Lindsay, the body was taken by Mr. Sackett to their old home in Pennsylvania for interment."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Pensacola Journal, (Pensacola, Fla.), September 27, 1905, p. 8, col. 2.
    "JACKSONVILLE'S NEW DREDGE ST JOHN
    She is a Fine Craft and is Doing Excellent Work on the St Johns River.
    Jacksonville, Sept. 26.—The United States engineering department's dredge St John, under command of Superintendent C. N. Ble came up the river Saturday night and was moored at the L'Engle coal docks. She remained at the dock all day yesterday having bunkers filled with coal. J. B. Lucy of the L'engle Coal superintended the loading which was done by steam.
    Yesterday morning Col. J. W. Sackett and Clark Woodward of the engineering department called let on Superintendent Ble, and it was while they were aboard the vessel that a reporter called to learn what had been done in the way of dredging down the river.
    Colonel Sackett states that at present the St. John is working at Wards Bank cut, half way between Mayport and the bar.
    Channel Greatly Deepened.
    When the St. John began her work at that point, the depth of water was only eighteen feet, but she has dredged the channel to a depth of 22 feet. A few days ago a ship crossed the bar drawing twenty-one feet at low water, showing that the channel is in no way shallow at that point.
    Colonel Sackett says the work is progressing rapidly and smoothly.
    A Fine Record
    The St. John has established record for dredging here four thousand yards a day which is equal to eight hundred solid carloads of material. Last Friday she removed four thousand and eight hundred and eight yards which was all taken to sea and dumped about one mile southeast of the bell buoy in ten fathoms of water.
    This dredge has the capacity of pumping from twelve to sixteen a yards per minute, depending on the tide and character of material she encounters. Much of the time is consumed in carrying the material to sea and discharging it.
    At Ward's Bank Cut.
    The St. John will probably work at Ward's Bank cut for two months longer, then go to what is known as the Mayport cut, further up the river.
    Superintendent O. N. Ble, now in command of the St. John was placed in charge of the dredge Florida upon her completion. On August 4, Captain Frank B. Avery resigned as master of St. John and Superintendent Ble was at once placed in command.
    He was assisted by Mate A. W. Brown, Chief Engineer Amander Parsons and Assistants C. F. Burroughs and F. T. Nolan. The St. John carries a crew of thirty-five men.
    Director of Machinery
    Guy W. Sackett directs the handling of the drags and pumping machinery, and while the boat is dredging he has charge of the speed of the boat, which is necessary in all dredging work.
    The St. John is without a doubt one of the finest dredge boats in the service, and she is doing some excellent work on the St. Johns river."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Guy Woodford Sackett (1885–1984)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star, (Ocala, Fla.), October 5, 1905, p. 3, col. 2.
    "Mr. Will Sackett, who went on the sad journey of accompanying the remains of his wife to his old home in Bucks county, Pa., returned today. Mr. Sackett and wife had been residing on the old Green place on Orange avenue for about a year when recently his wife, for whose health they had come to Florida, died very suddenly. Mr. Sackett intends to ship his stock and household goods back to this old home and reside there. They were both splendid people and made many friends during their residence here, who deeply sympathize with Mr. Sackett in the loss of his estimable wife."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Banner, (Ocala, Marion County, Fla.), October 6, 1905, p. 1, col. 5.
    "Mr. William Sackett returned to Ocala yesterday from Pennsylvania where he accompanied the remains of his wife who died in Ocala several weeks ago. He will go back to Pennsylvania in a short time to reside."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Pensacola Journal, (Pensacola, Fla.), October 28, 1905, p. 3, col. 4.
    "West Coast Work
    When the dredge Florida completes her work on the Indian river she will proceed to the west coast of Florida where she has much work to do on the small rivers and harbors.
    The people of Florida should feel proud of this dredgeboat, designed by Col. J. W. Sackett of this city, built in Jacksonville by the Merrill-Stevens Company, and is without a doubt one of the handsomest dredges in the South."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star, (Ocala, Fla.), March 2, 1906, p. 2, col. 5.
    "General Charles P. Lovell of Jacksonville, commanding the first brigade of the Florida state troops, has retired at his own request and Colonel Jno W. Sackett of the first regiment has been appointed brigadier general, and Lieut Col John S Maxwell succeeds Colonel Sackett."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Weekly True Democrat (Tallahassee, Fla.), March 2, 1906, page unk, col. 3.
    "Military Changes.
    At his own request, by general order, General Charles P. Lovell, commanding the First Brigade, Florida State Troops, the ranking line officer, has retired. Colonel John W. Sackett, commanding the First Regiment of Infantry, has been appointed Brigadier General to succeed General Lovett (sic). Lieutenant Colonel John S. Maxwell, of the First Regiment of Infantry, has been appointed Colonel to succeed Colonel Sackett in command of the regiment.
    These changes became effective yesterday and will come as a great surprise to the people of the entire State, for few indeed had the slightest idea that such changes were pending. General Lovell, General Sackett and Colonel Maxwell are too well known to the people of Florida for any comment upon the changes to be necessary."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Daytona Gazette-News (Daytona, Fla.) March 3, 1906, page unk, col. 6.
    "GEN. LOVELL HAS RETIRED.
    Colonel Sackett Succeeds Him.—H. B. Yarborough Commissioned Second Lieutenant and Quartermaster.
    At his own request, General Charles P. Lovell, commanding the First Brigade, Florida State Troops, the ranking line officer has retired.
    Colonel John W. Sackett, commanding the First Regiment of Infantry, has been appointed brigadier general to succeed General Lovell.
    …"
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Banner, (Ocala, Marion County, Fla.), March 9, 1906, p. 1, col. 5.
    "Military Affairs.
    At his own request, General Charles P. Lovell, of Jacksonville, commanding the First Brigade, Florida State Troops, the ranking line officer has retired.
    Coloned John W. Sackett commanding the First Regiment of Infantry, has been appointed brigadier general to succeed General Lovell.
    Lieutenant Colonel John S. Maxwell, of the First Regiment of Infantry, has been appointed colonel to succeed Colonel Sackett in command of the regiment."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star, (Ocala, Fla.), April 12, 1906, p. 2, col. 4.
    "MACCABEES DISTRICT MEETING
    The District Convention of Modern Maccabees, held in Jacksonville Tuesday afternoon was a most succesful and important one. Delegates were present representing Jacksonville, Ocala, White Springs, Tallahassee, Palatka and Lake City.
    The delegates were honored by the presence of the distinguished founder of the order and its present Great Commander in the person of Maj. N. S. Boynton, of Port Huron, Mich.
    Napoleon B. Broward. governor of Florida and an enthusiastic member, was chosen by a unanimous vote to represent this state at the coming great camp review.
    Governor Broward was placed in nomination by Sir Knight A. C. Hamrick in an appropriate speech, and he was chosen amid enthusiasm. Mr. Hamrick was selected as the other delegate.
    Sir Knights G. W. Martin and J H Slagle were elected as alternates.
    The meeting, which was officially known as the County Camp No. 88, was called to order by Gen. J. W. Sackett, of Tent No. 1292, of Jacksonville, who stated the object of the meeting and appointed as a committee on credentials Sir Knights A. C. Hamrick, G. W. Martin and Joseph N. Smith.
    The delegates in attendance or represented by proxy were Sir Knights A. C. Hamrick, Tent No. 1292, Jacksonville; G. W. Martin, Tent No. 1409, Ocala; Joseph N. Smith, White Springs; Gov. N. B. Broward, Tent No. 1332, Tallahassee; Rev. J. F. Richey, Tent No. 1372, Palatka; J. H. Slagle, Tent No. 1312, Lake City.
    Geo. W. Martin of Tent No. 1409, Ocala, Fla., was elected as county commander, and Joseph N. Smith of White Springs as county record keeper, and will hold these positions until the convention meets in Jacksonville, two years hence."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.), May 12, 1906, p. 1, col. 2.
    "IN THE SUN'S CHARIOT
    Intimate Talks Between Publisher and Reader

    Your attention is directed to the symposium on the condition of the state milita which begins in this issue—
    General Sackett who commands the first bregade of F. S. T. contributes a most interesting paper—

    Look for General Sackett's article in the number and when you have found it, read it carefully. …"
    [Transcribers note: The General Sackett mentioned is probably Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860-1918), #I64960 in the Sackett family database.]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.), May 12, 1906, p. 3, cols. 1–3.
    "WHAT AILS THE MILITIA
    A Symposium on this Subject to be Conducted in the Sun for the Purpose of Finding the Cause and Prescribing the Remedy for the Decline in Military Enthusism Among Floridians
    For some time is has been apparent that the people of this State were losing interest in the State militia.
    Several companies have disbanded during the past year, notably, Wilson's Battery of Jacksonville, one of the oldest companies in the State; and it is known that several more companies are in danger of being overtaken by the same fate.
    Believing that local military companies are necessary in order that the people may have that sense of security in their lives and property that is essential to the pursuit of happiness, THE SUN, has inaugurated this symposium for the purpose of locating the trouble and stopping it.
    THE SUN has addressed a letter to each military man in the State, requesting an article on the subject.
    The first answer received came from Brig. Gen. J. W. Sackett, which we print below; others will follow as fast as they reach us.
    An earnest request is made of all who have knowledge of military matters, to engage in this discussion. This request is proffered to those who may not have received written requests from us, to whom we give our thanks in advance for the favor done us.
    GENERAL SACKETT'S PAPER
    Jacksonville, Fla., May 8, 1906.
    Mr. Claude L'Engle, Editor Sun, Jacksonville, Fla.:
    Dear Sir—In response to your request to give my views regarding the condition of the military companies in the several communites of the State, the following is submitted:
    THE STATE TROOPS.
    Prior to the Spanish-American War, the military organizations throughout the State served a two-fold purpose, the primary object of course, being the protection of the homes and firesides of our people and the common weal in other directions. In general, forming a bulwark behind which, in times of need, law and order could find assistance and protection should riot overrun any portion of our fair domain, or a common foe dare trespass upon our paramount rights and privileges. Aside from this patriotic purpose these several organizations composed societies which afforded the members many social advantages in their club features and the frequent entertainments, which were of such a nature that it was considered a high privilege to be permitted to participate in them. It was not always an easy matter to become a member of these organizations. Applicants, besides possessing the prerequisites necessary to make a soldier, had to stand the test of the ballots of the members, who were jealous of this right and carefully guarded against the admittance of any one whose social standing and general character was such as to unfit him to associate with the other members on terms of equality. Further, it was required that the members pay for the privilege of belonging to the organization in the form of monthly dues. The organizations supplied their own uniforms, and frequently portions of their equipment, besides equipping their armories with furniture and literature and apparatus for athletic exercises, amusement and recreation. They generally had funds in their treasury which they augment from time to time as occasion required by giving fairs and entertainments, which the public patronized liberally. As a rule, the organizations were not large, consisting generally of from sixty-five to forty active members.
    Then came the Spanish-American War. Every military company in the State was extremely anxious to participate, and I believe without exception promptly volunteered. To make themselves eligible, however, it was necessary for each company to recruit to about three times its former strength. In fear of not being able to present themselves with a sufficiant number of men who could pass the required examinations, the highways and byways were searched, and every available man was accepted, without special regard to his standing in the community. In consequence the morale of the troops was much lowered and the esprite de corps in the several organizations, which formally existed, was lacking. Notwithstanding this, to their credit be it said, the First Florida Volunteers formed a most excellent body of men, and had opportunity been afforded them there is no question that they would have acquitted themselves in a manner at least above reproach. But instead of going to the front with the first expedition, as had reasonably been expected, month after month followed of arduous and disagreeable camp duty, with sickness and disease stalking through their company streets, due to the unsanitary location of their camps, for which those in higher authority were responsible. During this time they were buoyed up, however, by rumors and occasional preparations with the ostensible object of joining the next expedition. Disappointment after disappointment followed, until when finally ordered to be mustered out, the men had become generally discouraged with their experience, and for a considerable period of time afterwards little or no interest was manifested in military affairs throughout the State. Public-spirited officers and men, realizing the importance of maintaining military organizations in various localities in the State, attempted to re-establish the former condition of affairs, but with indifferent success, although during this time troops rendered material service to the city of Jacksonville at the time and subsequently to the calamity of the great fire. Finally under the leadership of our present Adjutant General, and under the stimulus of Federal aid, as provided in the act of Congress generally known as the Dick bill, the State Troops assembled in encampment in Jacksonville in 1903 with at least a semblance of their old-time spirit. The two encampments since and the participation in the war maneuvers at Manassas have been the means of imparting valuable experience and information to the officers and men. But during the interims great difficulty has been experience in maintaining the organizations in a condition approaching standard efficiency. The reason appears plain. The men have little or no incentive to attend drills other than their innate patriotism, for which it is only too plainly apparent, practically no appreciation is given by the average citizen in whose interest he is devoting his time and service. Uniforms, as well as equipment, are now supplied by the general Government, and there is no pressing necessity for entertainments to raise funds for the purchase of supplies, without which the organization could not be maintained; consequently these opportunites of interesting the general public in military affairs and of commingling with the other members of the social world is not afforded them. Here in Jacksonville there is no opportunity at present to introduce the club features of the former organization, for the reason that the quarters afforded in the present armory are inadequate for the proper storing of the military equipment alone. The officers find it necessary to share among them all one small room in the tower for office purposes and a place to keep their company records. And here let me say for the officers: Good officers, as a rule, are found only among men of affairs. Under the new law much more is expected of them than formally. While this may not appear to be much to the regular officer, who is accustomed to perform such duties as a matter of routine day in and day out, it is much for the officer of the citizen soldiery. His hours of leisure are needed for relaxation from mental and bodily strain occasioned by his daily occupation. When he has to devote, say only part of his leisure to the study of Drill Regulations, Organization and Tactics, and Security and Defense, to say nothing of the Army Regulations, and further to concentrate his mind on company affairs and records, taking up the broken threads where he left off some time before, fill out forms and prepare his reports, he has tasks that are very trying to the average man, and for which he generally has occasion to feel are far from being appreciated, even if he executes such tasks faithfully and uncomplainingly. Notwithstanding all this, I am satisfied our officers would willingly undertake and perform all that is expected of them if they were assured the cooperation of the business man, the citizens in general, and last but far from least, the ladies of the home circles of the members of their organizations.
    The business man should be sufficiently alive to his personal interests and exhibit sufficient patriotism to encourage the military spirit among his employees and in his family, and not placate his conscience with the idea that their are plenty of others who can do this without interferring with his own business or financial arrangements. It is recognized as a fact that the most valuable employees make the best military men. Instead of deducting from the usually meager vacation allowed his employees the time required for military service, he should willingly accord this time in addition. He should carefully avoid connivance with an employee who wishes to shirk his military duty and solicits his aid in the respect, requesting permission to say that his employer will not permit him to be absent from his work for such purpose.
    A new and commodious armory, centrally located, with sufficient vacant space surrounding it and so located that it could be readily defended, should be provided in the city of Jacksonville at the earliest day practicable.
    With such co-operation and increased facilities, the writer feels certain that within a short time the troops would attain a standard of efficiency which would at least compare favorably with, if not excel, the best to be found anywhere. Very respectfully,
    J. W. Sackett,
    Brigadier General Commanding First Brigade, Florida State Troops."
    [Transcribers note: This is Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860-1918), #I64960 in the Sackett family database.]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.), May 19, 1906, p. 11, cols. 1–3.
    "WHAT AILS THE MILITIA
    A Symposium on this Subject to be Conducted in the Sun for the Purpose of Finding the Cause and Prescribing the Remedy for the Decline in Military Enthusism Among Floridians
    For some time is has been apparent that the people of this State were losing interest in the State militia.
    Several companies have disbanded during the past year, notably, Wilson's Battery of Jacksonville, one of the oldest companies in the State; and it is known that several more companies are in danger of being overtaken by the same fate.
    Believing that local military companies are necessary in order that the people may have that sense of security in their lives and property that is essential to the pursuit of happiness, THE SUN, has inaugurated this symposium for the purpose of locating the trouble and stopping it.
    THE SUN has addressed a letter to each military man in the State, requesting an article on the subject.
    This symposium began last week with a very interesting paper from Brigadier-General J. W. Sackett, commanding First Brigade, Florida State Troops, whose knowledge of military affairs gives weight to his opinion.
    The second letter received was from Capt. W. H. Lyle of Live Oak, formerly in command of the Live Oak Company, but now retired.
    CAPTAIN LYLE'S PAPER.
    …"
    [Transcribers note: The Brigadier-General J. W. Sackett mentioned is Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860-1918), #I64960 in the Sackett family database.]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.), June 2, 1906, p. 11, cols. 1–3.
    "WHAT AILS THE MILITIA
    A Symposium on this Subject to be Conducted in the Sun for the Purpose of Finding the Cause and Prescribing the Remedy for the Decline in Military Enthusism Among Floridians
    Believing that local military companies are necessary in order that the people may have that sense of security in their lives and property that is essential to the pursuit of happiness, THE SUN, has inaugurated this symposium for the purpose of improving the militia organizations in this State.
    THE SUN has addressed a letter to each military man in the State, requesting an article on the subject.
    This symposium began three weeks ago with a very interesting paper from Brigadier-General J. W. Sackett, commanding First Brigade, Florida State Troops; the second paper was from Capt. W. H. Lyle of Live Oak, formarly in command of the Live Oak Company, but now retired.
    The third paper follows:
    BY COL. JOHN S. MAXWELL.
    …"
    [Transcribers note: The Brigadier-General J. W. Sackett mentioned is Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860-1918), ID #I64960 in the Sackett family database.]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Weekly True Democrat (Tallahassee, Fla.), July 6, 1906, p. unk, col. 5.
    "THE STATE ENCAMPMENT
    Troops Will Assemble at Tampa August 6, for Eight Days.
    The following order, announcing the encampment by brigade of the Florida State troops at Tampa August 6 to 13, has been issued by Adjutant General Foster:
    State of Florida Adjutant-Generals Office, Tallahassee July 1 1906.
    General Orders No. 2:
    An encampment of the brigade of the Florida State Troops will be held at Tampa commencing August 6, 1905, and covering a period of eight days. The several commands composing the brigade will, where practicable, proceed from their home stations so as to reach the place of rendezvous by noon of Monday, August 6th, but all commands must arrive in Tampa during that day.
    The soldier who fails to attend (except in the cases of properly authorized absence) will be regarded as absent without leave, or in desertion, as the circumstances in the case may indicate. The commanding officer of every officer enlisted man so absent will file at regimental headquarters on the day of his arrival in camp charges and specifications against the delinquent, and such charges and specifications will be for forwarded immediately by the regimental commander for the consideration of the commander-in-chief.
    J. CLIFFORD FOSTER
    Adjutant General.
    Brig. Gen. John W. Sackett will be in command of the camp."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Banner, (Ocala, Marion County, Fla.), July 20, 1906, p. 3, col. 4.
    "THE STATE ENCAMPMENT
    Troops Will Assemble Tampa August 6 for Eight Days.
    The following order, announcing the encampment by brigades of the Florida State Troops at Tampa August 6 to 13 has been issued by Adjutant General Foster:
    State of Florida,
    Adjutant Generals Office,
    Tallahassee July 1, 1906.
    General Orders No2:
    An encampment of the brigade of the Florida State Troops will be held at Tampa commencing August 6 1906 and covering a period of eight days. The several commands composing the brigade, will where practicable, proceed from their home stations so as to reach the place of rendezvous by noon of Monday, August 6; but all commands must arrive in Tampa during that day.
    The soldier who fails to attend (except in case of properly authorized absence) will be regarded as absent without leave, or in desertion, as the circumstances in the case may indicate. The commanding officer of every officer or enlisted man so absent will file at regimental headquarters on the day of his arrival in camp charges and specifications against the delinquent and such charges and specifications will be forwarded immediately by the regimental commander for the consideration of the commander-in-chief.
    J. CLIFFORD R. FOSTER
    Adjutant General
    Brigadier General John W Sackett will be in command of the camp."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.), July 21, 1906, p. 5, cols. 1–2.
    "…
    Pa—I see, Algy, that you have been tainted by what you've seen written in the papers that are against drainage because their bosses, or the people who become their bosses by paying for their space, have said about this surveying business. There have been two United States Government surveys made of the region around Lake Okeechobee and from the lake to the gulf. One was made in 1879, under the dirction Col. Gilmore. Another was made by Capt. J. W. Sackett, under the direction of Capt. Black. Although these surveys were made eight years apart, the reports on file in the War Department at Washington are almost identically the same. Capt. Sackett's report shows a difference between his survey and that of the 1879 survey as to the water level at a point 43 miles from the point of beginning, of little over two inches.

    Pa.—There you have struck it, my son. The reason why these thorough surveys have not been made is that Capt. Sackett reported, in 1887, to the War Department, that it was impossible to survey this region. …"
    [Transcriber's note: Above excerpted from an on-going article concerning the draining of the Everglades.]
    [Transcribers note: The Capt. J. W. Sackett mentioned is probably Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860-1918), #I64960 in the Sackett family database.]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star, (Ocala, Fla.), August 2, 1906, p. 2, col. 5.
    "STATE ENCAMPMENT GROUNDS
    At Tampa Are in Good Condition for Naval Reserves but a Trifle Moist for Infantry and Artillery
    That the camp grounds are in miserable condition is conceded by the military officers who have recently visited the site. The heavy rains of the past day or two have flooded the grounds and the place is now a veritable frog pond.
    The water on some parts of the grounds is quick to drain off, but in other sections it stands continuously, and those who have seen the site are of the opinion that under the conditions Generals Foster and Sackett will not allow the troops to pitch their tents.
    The rainy season being at hand is the cause for such a condition, and there is not any prospect of this weather letting up, and in consequence it is thought that the grounds will remain as at present unless Providence should come to the rescue of Tampa and see to it that the skies are cleared and this series of showers come to an end.
    Outside of being low, the grounds are delightful for the encampment, and if the weather was only at its best no more pleasant site could be found anywhere in the state.—Tampa Herald."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Pensacola Journal, (Pensacola, Fla.), October 31, 1906, p. 8, col. 5.
    "CHANGES ARE MADE IN NAVY

    F P Sackett detached from the Minneapolis and ordered to as general storekeeper. Naval Training Station, Newport, R. I.
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Weekly True Democrat (Tallahassee, Fla.), December 21, 1906, page unk, col. 1.
    "For a Permanent Encampment Act.
    Senator Louis C. Massey, who is chairman of the commission appointed by Governor Broward under an act of the last Legislature to select and recommend to the next Legislature a suitable tract of land for use as a permament camp site for the Florida State troops, has called a meeting of the commission, to be held at the Windsor hotel, in Jacksonville, at 8:30 p. m., on January 8, 1907.
    The commission consists of Hon. Louis C. Massey, who represents Orange county in the State Senate; Hon. William M. Girardeau, Senator-elect from Jefferson county; Hon. Eugene S. Matthews, member of the House of Representatives from Bradford county; Gen. J. Clifford E. Foster, Adjutant-General of Florida; Gen. Charles P. Lovell, retired; Gen. John N. Sackett, commanding the brigade, and Col. Henry Bacon, Surgeon General of the Florida State troops. The act providing for the commission specifies that one of its members shall be a competent engineer and one a medical or sanitary officer. Gen. Sackett and Col. Bacon were specially selected because of their qualifications in these respects.
    The first meeting of the commission was held at Lake City, Fla., on October 18, 1905, where the commission organized by the selection of Hon. Louis C. Massey as chairman and Gen. Foster as secretary. At that meeting the following resolution was adopted:
    "Resolved, That this commission will recommend as a permanent camp site for the Florida State troops only a tract of land embracing in body at least three hundred acres, high and healthfully located, with adequate supply of good water, preferably on a large lake or stream of running water, and centrally located with regard to railway transportation. Such tract must be located from three to five miles from the nearest city."
    The commission then adjourned subject to the call of the chairman, it being understood that the adjournment was taken for the purpose of allowing persons who have knowledge of the locations of tracts of land which will meet the specifications set out in the above resolution to give notice of the same to the commission.
    It is understood that quite a number of propositions have been presented, coming from various sections of the State; and advance notice of the meeting to be held in January is being given in order that any other persons or communities having propositions to submit may be ableto get the same before the commission prior to its final meeting."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The DeLand Weekly News, (DeLand, Fla.), December 21, 1906, p. unk, col. 3.
    "Local and Personal Briefs
    Rev. John N. Sackett and wife, of Pen Yann, N. Y., are located in the Patton cottage."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Pensacola Journal, (Pensacola, Fla.) December 23, 1906, 2d Section, p. 10, col. 3.
    "CAMP SITE FOR STATE TROOPS
    Will Be Selected at Meeting of the Commission in Jacksonville on January 8.
    Senator Louis C. Massey, who is chairman of the commission appointed by Governor Broward under an act of the last legislature to select and recommend to the next legislature a suitable tract of land for use as a permanent camp site for the Florida state troops, has called a meeting of the commission, to be held at the Windsor Hotel, in Jacksonville at 8:50 p. m. on January 9, 1907.
    This commission consists of Hon. Louis C. Massey, who represents Orange county in the state senate; Hon. William M. Girardeau, senator-elect from Jefferson county; Hon. Eugene S. Matthews, member of the house of representatives from Bradford county; General J. Clifford R. Foster, adjutant general of Florida; General Charles P. Lovell, retired; General John W. Sackett commanding the brigade, and Colonel Henry Bacon, surgeon general of the Florida state troops. The act providing for the commission specifies that one of its members shall be a competent engineer and one a medical or sanitary officer. General Sackett and Colonel Bacon were specially selected because of their qualifications in these respects.
    The first meeting of the commission was held at Lake City, Florida on October 19, 1905, where the commission organized by the selection of Hon Louis C. Massey as chairman and General Foster as secretary. At that meeting the following resolution was adopted:
    Resolved, That this commission will recommend as a permanent camp site for the Florida state troops only a tract of land embracing in a body at least three hundred acres, high and healthful located, with adequate supply of good water, preferably on a large lake or stream of running water, and centrally located with regard to railway transportation. Such tract must be located from three to five miles from the nearest city."
    The commission then adjourned, subject to the call of the chairman, it being understood that the adjournment was taken for the purpose of allowing persons who have knowledge of the location of tracts of land which will meet the specifications set out in the above resolution to give notice of the same to the commission.
    It is understood that quite a number of propositions have been presented coming from various sections of the state; and advance notice of the meeting to be held in January as being given in order that any other persons or communities having propositions to submit may be able to get the same before the commission prior to its final meeting."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Pensacola Journal, (Pensacola, Fla.), January 20, 1907, 1st Section, p. 1, col. 1.
    "…
    Adjutant General Foster spent several days of last week attending the meeting of the special commission appointed by the governor under a provision of the last legislature to select a permanent camp site for the state troops. The commission consists of Adjutant-General Foster, Surgeon Henry Bacon, Col. J. W. Sackett, General Lovell, Hon. Louis C. Massey of Orlando, Hon. W. M. Girardeau of Monticello and Hon. Eugene S. Matthews of Starke. The commission inspected tracts offered by individuals and local organizations as follows: The Ortega tract near Jacksonville, Kingsley Lake tract near Starke, a proposition submitted from Suwannee Springs and an exceedingly liberal proposition from the promoters of Dowling Park. Since the meeting of the commission several other propositions have been submitted for their consideration.
    …"
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Pensacola Journal, (Pensacola, Fla.), January 29, 1907, p. 4, col. 7.
    "REPORT OF THE ARMY OFFICERS
    Detailed for Tour of Duty With Florida State Troops
    Adjt. Gen. J. Clifford R. Foster has made public the official reports of the army officers detailed by the war department for duty at the encampment of the Florida state troops at Tampa, August 6 to 12, 1906 says the Jacksonville Times-Union.
    The officers making the reports were Capt M. C. Bucky, of the artillery corps, and Capt. A. Greig, Jr., also of the artillery corps, United States army.
    The reports of these officers are full and complete. They cover the subjects of transportation of the troops to and from the camp; the encampment as a whole; the camp; the clothing and equipment of the troops; how the troops were subsisted; the personnel and discipline; target practice; the record keeping and the general conditions.
    Willing to Learn
    In his final summing up Capt M. C. Bucky says:
    It is due in justice to the First regiment and to the brigade of the Florida state troops to call attention to the fact, in view of the criticisms made in this report, that over 5 percent of the troops present at the encampment were practically recruits and had never been in camp before. The personnel is excellent, energetic, cheerful, showing themselves on every occasion anxious and willing to learn, under arduous conditions as to climate and weather.
    The camp was a hardworking one but the recruits showed for themselves in the marked improvement evident to all concerned . It is very necessary however that the details and errors of drills guard duty making of camp and other routine matters corrected and commented upon be given most careful study in the time elapsing before the next encampment by the officers so that the benefits resulting from this encampment may be enjoyed to the fullest extent by the Florida state troops.
    The arms were not in good condition, in many cases quite rusty although the climate of Florida makes it not easy to keep the rifles and equipment in good condition yet it I can be done and if this care is not exercised it will do serious damage and company commanders should pay most particular attention to this matter a great deal more than has been done in the past.
    The greatest care should be exercised in not bringing ball ammunition to the encampment; in spite of orders issued to the contrary from the office of the adjutant general of the state, there was ball ammunition in the camp, and serious consequences might readily result. Neglect of orders in this regard should be regarded as a serious military offense.
    Upon breaking of camp it was very gratifying to discover upon inspection that every latrine of the First regiment was carefully filled up, showing that the instructions given in regard to camp sanitation was being put Into practice.
    Medals for Soldiers
    Gold and silver efficiency medals for the two best drilled and most efficient soldiers, as well as a pennant for the most efficient company in the brigade have been provided through the initiative and tireless energy, for everything tending to increase the efficiency and development of the brigade of the adjutant general, Major Gen. Foster.
    From the Interest already displayed these undoubtedly will foster and develop a spirit of friendly emulation so much to be desired in any organization among the enlisted personnel and companies of the brigade.
    This report has been unavoidably delayed owing to the fact that certain necessary data as the field return of the troops required to accompany this report was sent to me by mall and was by an error forwarded to the post and was not received by me until my arrival on November 24, 1906. The order directing this report with the different subjects outlined therein was not mailed to me until the encampment was over.
    In conclusion I desire to make of record the uniform courtesy extended to me on all occasions by every member of the brigade of the Florida state troops. Especially to Major John A Dapray, U. S. A. retired; Major Gen. J. Clifford R. Foster and Brig. Gen. John W. Sackett and his brigade staff, Col. Walter P. Corbett, inspector general and Col. John S. Maxwell and the staff of the First regiment with whom it was my privilege to be thrown into more intimate relations.
    Respectfully submitted
    M. C. BUCKEY
    Captain Artillery Corps."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Pensacola Journal, (Pensacola, Fla.) March 6, 1907, p. 3, col. 4–5.
    "TROOPS MAY GO TO JAMESTOWN
    Annual Encampment of Florida Soldiers May Be at Exposition
    "By reason of the military character of the Jamestown centennial exposition at Norfolk Va., this year, we believe that special benefit would accrue to the state troops and to the state by holding the encampment of 1907 on the grounds of such exposition, and if any legislative or executive action is required to this end, we recommend that the same be taken."
    Such was the decision of the Florida National Guard Association at the meeting held in this city last week, and this will meet with the unanimous approval of the various military organizations of the state says the Jacksonville Times-Union.
    The resolution was incorporated in the recommendations of the association through the efforts of Capt. Henry Cohen, of Tampa, commanding officer of the Tampa Rifles and post commander of the state military organizations at Tampa.
    Capt. Cohen stated that the men of his company were unanimously in favor of the encampment being held at Jamestown this year, and that whether or not the state encampment was held at Jamestown, his company Intends going to the exposition.
    Favored by the Colonel
    Col. Maxwell, commanding the First infantry, was strongly in favor of the annual encampment being held at Jamestown this year. He pointed out the advantages to the troops from the knowledge that they would acquire if given an opportunity to visit the exposition. It will help materially in recruiting up the companies to the required number, for there will be so many applications for enlistment with such a trip in prospect, that by exercising discretion and only selecting the best, the companies can be filled with a desirable class of men for the next three years, for the enlistments are all for three years. Col. Maxwell also pointed out that the fact that the United States regulars would be in came at the exposition and also troops from other states would of itself be an advantage to the Florida troops for watching work of the other commands does almost as much good as practice.
    For the Enlisted Men
    Lieut. Archie E. Leslie, of Live Oak addressed the association from the standpoint of the enlisted men. He pointed out that all during the year the men look forward to going somewhere for the encampment; it is with many of the men the only opportunity they have during the year to get away from home and he said he was confident that when it is known that the troops are to go to the Jamestown exposition there will be general rejoicing and the company commanders will have no trouble in recruiting up their commands to the required standard. He favored the association strongly recommending that the encampment be held at Jamestown.
    Brig. Gen. Sackett, commanding the Florida brigade of state troops was at first not in favor of the troops going to Jamestown. He took the ground that if the encampment was held there the troops would lose much that would be of value to them that could be learned at a camp within the state. He said he would like to see the troops given every entertainment possible, but did not believe that they should lose the year's instruction.
    Does Them Good
    Capt. Harvey R. Payne, of Jacksonville, formerly commander of the Jacksonville Light Infantry, was strongly in favor of the troops going to the exposition for the encampment. He stated that when his company was getting ready to go to the world's fair at St. Louis the men worked harder than they ever did before. They took a pride in being the best company in the regiment during the encampment at St Augustine prior to the trip to Manassas which preceded the trip to St. Louis.
    Capt. Cohen took the ground that it would not only be a benefit to the troops for the time being but for years to come. He said that at present there is very little to encourage the men to enlist and give their time to the state but if it was an assured fact that the troops are to go to the exposition the troops could be enlisted up to any number desired.
    Major Daprays Views
    Major J. A. Dapray, military advisor to the governor called attention to the new regulation which requires all companies to have a minimum of fifty-eight men and said that he was confident that with the incentive of the Jamestown trip before them there would be little trouble in recruiting the companies to a number that would enable each company to keep that number on its muster roll. He said that the object lesson of seeing the regulars and troops from other states in camp would be of great benefit to the men.
    Col. W. B. Young, a member of the governor's staff, was heartily in favor of the troops going to the exposition for their annual encampment. He told of his experiences when he was the company commander of the J. L. I., of taking his company on a trip. He said that their behavior was all that could be desired; that it put the men on their mettle and they were greatly improved, in his opinion by all such trips.
    Major John B. Parkinson, of Daytona, was also very strongly in favor of the proposed trip. He said that at present it was very hard to keep the companies up to the required standard; that the service must be made attractive to the men to get and keep good men in the commands. He believed that the trip would do the companies good and that by being careful in enlisting only good men it would help the entire state troops I very much.
    Gen. Sackett Willing
    After various officers had expressed their opinion on the subject Gen. Sackett said that he would not oppose the recommendation and had only stated his objections because he regretted to see the opportunity lost for gaining instruction as at the regular encampments. He thereupon withdrew his objections and recommendations were endorsed by a unanimous vote.
    During the discussion on this subject Gen. Foster, who recently made his annual inspection of the troops at this post said that during the present inspection tour he had never seen the state troops in a more efficient condition. He said that the Jacksonville companies in particular were in better condition than ever before and the attendance was far better."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Pensacola Journal (Pensacola, Fla.), May 8, 1907, p. 5, col. 5.
    "A SOCIABLE COMPANION
    The Chatty Traveler Who Charmed Ralph Waldo Emerson
    It is related that Ralph Waldo Emerson was once on his way to California when he was joined by a man who was altogether so sociable and chatty that an otherwise tedious journey was rendered quite cheerful. This man's name was Sackett, and he told Mr. Emerson that he resided in San Francisco. Mr. Sackett indicated all the points of interest along the way, related a lot of amusing anecdotes and, best of all, was also an attentive listener. The consequence was that Mr. Emerson came to the conclusion that Mr. Sackett was as charming a man as he had ever met, and it was in this positive conviction that he accepted Mr. Sackett's invitation to dine with him immediately upon their arrival in San Francisco. The next morning Mr. Emerson was astonished and annoyed to find in all the local papers this startling personal notice: 'Professor Ralph Waldo Emerson, scholar and poet, is in our city as the guest of J. Sackett, the well know proprietor of the Bush Street Dime museum. Matinees every half hour. Admission only 10 cents. The double headed calf and the dog faced boy this week!'"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • Live Oak Daily Democrat (Live Oak, Fla.) June 21, 1907, p. 1, col. 5.
    "Bechtel Guilty.
    Minneapolis, Minn., June 19—W. F. Bechtel, former president of the Northwestern National Life Insurance Company of Minneapolis, was tonight found guilty of grand larceny by a jury, which had been out twenty-eight hours. Sentence will be imposed Saturday morning. Bechtel was found guilty of an indictment charging that he entered into an illegal agreement with Frederick Sackett, treasurer of the company, whereby Sackett was to pay Bechtel the difference between his nominal and actual salary."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star, (Ocala, Fla.), August 10, 1907, p. unk, col. 4.
    "Mrs Chas. E. Taylor leaves tonight for Jacksonville, where she goes to be present at the marriage of her sister Miss Edith Wilson, to Mr. Guy W. Sackett, which happy event takes place in St. Johns church on next Wednesday. Miss Wilson was a guest of Mrs Taylor about a year ago, and is pleasantly remembered by many Ocala people as a most charming and accomplished young lady."
    [Guy Woodford Sackett (1885–1984)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star (Ocala, Fla.), August 17, 1907, p. unk, col. 5.
    "WILSON–SACKETT
    On Wednesday afternoon at 6 o'clock, St. Johns church, Jacksonville, was the scene of a quiet, pretty little wedding. The contracting parties were Miss Edith Mildred Wilson and Mr. Guy Woodford Sackett.
    Promptly at 5 o'clock, to the sweet strains of Mendelssohn's wedding march, played by Miss Weldon-Lund, who dispensed music during the ceremony, the bridal party entered led by Miss Edith Kemps, the bride, who was beautifully attired in a traveling costume of dark blue silk, following with her sister, Mrs. Chas. E. Taylor, of this city, who gave her away.
    At the chancel they were met by the groom and his best man, Mr. Edwin T. Porter, and in an impressive manner Rev. V. M. Shields read the beautiful marriage service of the Episopal church that united this happy pair.
    Only the relatives and a few very intimate friends were present.
    The afternoon was beautiful and everything betokens for Mr. and Mrs. Sackett a bright and happy future.
    The bride is a charming and accomplished young lady, the daughter of Captain and Mrs. Charles Wilson, of Fort George. Mr. Sackett is a young man of sterling qualities, son of Col. and Mrs. John Warren Sackett, of Jacksonville, and holds an important government position.
    The happy couple were the recipients of some very handsome and useful presents.
    Mr. and Mrs. Sackett left at 7:45 for Cornella, Ga., where they will spend their honeymoon, followed by the best wishes of a host of friends for a long and happy life."
    [Guy Woodford Sackett (1885–1984)]
    [Col. J. W. Sackett, is Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Banner, (Ocala, Marion County, Fla.), August 23, 1907, p. unk, c. 3.
    "Quiet Church Wedding
    Wednesday evening at 5 o'clock at St. John church, Miss Edith Mildred Wilson of Fort George Island was united in marriage to Mr Guy Woodford Sackett of this city.
    The ceremony was performed by Rev. Van Winder Shields and Mrs. Weldom Lund presided at the organ.
    The maid of honor was Miss Ethel Kemps and Miss Wilson entered with the matron of honor, her sister, Mrs. Charles E. Taylor, of Ocala.
    At the chancel they were met by the groom and his best man Mr Edwin Porter, and then Dr. Shields read the impressive ceremony which united them for life.
    The pretty bride wore a handsome going-way gown of navy blue silk with hat to match. Her bouquet was of brides roses and ferns.
    Miss Kemp was also daintily gowned and looked very sweet.
    After the ceremony Mr. and Mrs. Sackett and the family and bridal party enjoyed a dainty wedding supper at the home of the bride's sister, Mrs David Frazter Kemps on Market street.
    They left on the evening train for Atlanta and other points in Georgia.
    Mrs. Sackett is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wilson of Fort George Island and has a large number of friends there and at other towns in the vicinity. She is a bright, attractive and young girl, whom her friends will wish all happiness in the new life which is to be hers.
    Mr Sackett is a son of Mr. and Mrs. John Warren Sackett of Jacksonville and is a young mand of successful traits of character. His hundreds of friends will congratulate him on winning so charming a bride.—Sunday's Times-Union.
    Mrs. Sackitt, as Miss Wilson, has frequently visited in Ocala as the frequent guest of her sister, Mrs. Taylor.
    [Guy Woodford Sackett (1885–1984)]
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star, (Ocala, Fla.), September 6, 1907, p. unk, col. 3.
    "Mrs. Guy W. Sackett of Jacksonville is visiting her sister, Mrs. Chas. E. Taylor, in this city."
    [Edith Mildred Wilson w. Guy Woodford Sackett (1885–1984)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star, (Ocala, Fla.), September 9, 1907, p. unk, c. 3.
    "Mr. Guy W. Sackett arrived in the city yesterday from St. Petersburg, and was the guest of Mr. and Mrs C. E. Taylor, at their cozy home on North Second street yesterday. Mr. Sackett came up to accompany his wife to St. Petersburg, where they will reside for the winter. They left over the Seaboard last night, making the trip via Tampa. Mr. Sackett is a valuable employee of the United States dredge St Johns, now dredging near Egmont Key."
    [Guy Woodford Sackett (1885–1984)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star (Ocala, Fla.), October 28, 1907, p. unk, col. 2.
    [Excerpted from a short story entitled "Our Ideals" by Alexander Ely]
    "…
    "What is my ideal?"
    "Nettie Sackett."
    I had spent some time with Miss Sackett at the tennis court the previous afternoon, Isabel being present. Miss Sackett didn't play tennis, and I couldn't, on account of my lame leg. We couldn't very well help being together.
    "Then you have only to give Miss Sackett's traits to express my ideal."
    "You don't care beauty. Miss Sackett is not beautiful, you know—nobody pretends to call her so—and an intellectual girl would bore you. Miss Sackett wasn't remarkable at school. Indeed, she failed at the final examination. You like wit in a girl, and you'll find it in Miss Sackett. Her tongue is sharp as a razor. The only objection I have to this feature is that she slashes people behind their backs."
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star (Ocala, Fla.), February 11, 1908, p. 4, col. 1.
    "Mrs. Guy Sackett arrived from St. Petersburg and is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. E. Taylor. Mr. Sackett has a position on the government dredge St. Johns, which has been at work in Tampa Bay, but will go around the coast to Jacksonville."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star, (Ocala, Fla.), 1895-1943, February 13, 1908, p. 5, col. 3.
    "Mrs. Guy W. Sackett, who has been visiting Mrs. Charles E. Taylor, her sister, left today for Gainesville, where she will visit relatives for a few days, ere going to her home in Jacksonville."
    [Edith Mildred Wilson w. Guy Woodford Sackett (1885–1984)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Banner, (Ocala, Marion County, Fla.), February 14, 1908, p. 1, col. 2.
    "Mrs. Guy Sackett of St. Petersburg is the guest of her sister, Mrs. Chas. E. Taylor."
    [Edith Mildred Wilson w. Guy Woodford Sackett (1885–1984)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • Gainesville Daily Sun, (Gainesville, Fla.), February 18, 1908, p. 8, col. 2.
    "Mrs. Guy W. Sackett St. Petereburg, who arrived the latter part of the week with the intention remaining here for several days as a guest of her uncle, S. H. Wienges, was called home suddenly on account of the arrival of her husband, who is a master of a vessel. It is to be regretted that she could not remain longer, but friends and relatives were glad to see here even for a brief period."
    [Edith Mildred Wilson w. Guy Woodford Sackett (1885–1984)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Pensacola Journal, (Pensacola, Fla.), March 27, 1908, p. 2, col. 4.
    "THE FLORIDA NAT'L GUARD
    Sixth Annual Convention to Convene in Jacksonville April 9 and 10.
    The sixth annual convention of the Florida National Guard Association is to convene in Jacksonville on April 9 for a session of two days, and the following interesting program has been prepared for the occasion:
    Thursday April 9
    1030 a. m.—Meeting wall be called to order in the assembly room of the Duval County Armory by the President Brigadier General Charles P. Lovell.
    Address of welcome by General W. H. Sebrlng, Mayor of Jacksonville.
    Response by the president of the association.
    Order of Business
    Roll call.
    Reading of minutes of previous meeting.
    Collection of dues.
    Reports of officers.
    Unfinished business.
    1:00 p. m.—Recess.
    2:30 p. m.—Convention reassembles
    New business.
    Address by Major C. P. Townsley, U. S. Coast Artillery, as the representative of the war department.
    Paper, "State Camp Ground and Rifle Range," by Brigadier General John W. Sackett member State Armory Board.
    Paper, "Field Maneuvers and Exercises," Brigadier General John Stevens Maxwell, First Brigade.
    Address by Captain L. S. Miller, U. S. Coast Artillery Corps.
    Paper, "Company Administration," by Colonel William LeFils, First Infantry
    Paper, "Rifle Practice by Captain John D. Blandling, Second Infantry, (State Secretary of the National Rifle Association).
    6:00 p.m.—Recess
    9:00 p.m.—A "Dollar Dinner."
    For the members and friends of the association.
    An address by Hon. Napoleon B. Broward, the commander-in-chief, and a few short talks by some of his predecessors and successors in office and others.
    Friday, April 10.
    10:00 p. m.—Convention reassembles
    New business, continued.
    An informal talk by the adjutant general on "The Plan of the Military Department."
    General discussion—"for good of the service."
    Election of officers.
    Selection of date and place for the next annual meeting.
    Adjournment.
    2:00 p. m.— Excursion to the new state camp ground and rifle range at Black Point on the St Johns River. The place of meeting to be announced at the morning session of the convention.
    9:00 p. m.—A ball at the Duval County Armory arranged by the officers of Jacksonville in honor of the visiting members of the Florida Guard Association.
    At all sessions of the convention the dress uniform will be worn by officers of the active and retired lists.
    For social functions the dress uniform is prescribed for officers and evening dress for all others."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • Fort Pierce News (Fort Pierce, Fla.), April 24, 1908, Page unk, col. 1.
    "A MESSAGE FROM THE SPIRIT LAND
    DeWitt Talmadge Talks to His Brethren in the Flesh
    The following is published by request and is claimed to be a message or lecture delivered by Rev. DeWitt Talmadge from the spirit land through a Spiritualist medium.
    [text of message]
    The above message was given in home, and copied by Mrs. Louise E. Sacket, 54 Andrew street, Springfield, Mass."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Ocala Evening Star, (Ocala, Fla.), November 20, 1908, p. 7, col. 1.
    "The stork visited the residence of General and Mrs. J. W. Sackett, Jacksonville, Sunday night and left a fine baby girl for Mr. and Mrs. Guy W. Sackett. Mrs Guy Sackett is a sister of Mrs. Chas. E. Taylor of this city."
    [Guy Woodford Sackett (1885–1984)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • Panama City Pilot (Panama City, Washington County, Fla.) December 10, 1908, p. 1, col. 2.
    "Delegates to National Rivers and Harbors Congress at Washington.

    General J. H. Sackett, Jacksonville, Fla.
    …"
    [Transcribers note: The Gen. J. H. Sackett mentioned is probably Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860-1918), #I64960 in the Sackett family database.]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Daytona Daily News, (Daytona, Fla.), March 23, 1909, Morning Edition, p. 1, col. 2.
    "IN CRITICAL CONDITION
    Yesterday morning an old gentleman by the name of J. M. Sackett, who some time ago came to Daytona Beach, and registered from Lowville, N. Y., became suddenly prostrated and now lies in a critical condition.
    The unfortunate old gentleman has been brought to Dr Klock's Hospital and Sanitarium, but little hope of his recovery is entertained.
    He seems to have been alone, and so far no one has been found who knows anything of his family or his relatives back in New York.
    In the meantime the stricken man is receiving the best possible care, and there will be no want of attention. He was boarding at the White House when the collapse came."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The St. Lucie County Tribune, (Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Fla.), April 9, 1909, p. 2, col. 1.
    "…
    Brig. Gen. W. H. Marshall, chief of engineers of the United States Army, with Capt. George R. Spaulding, resident engineer, and Gen. Sackett, assistant resident engineer, and members of the river and harbor committee of the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, made an inspection of the St. Johns river from Jacksonville to the jetties, on Monday, and the engineers were favorably impressed with the necessity of further improvements in the gateway to the Florida metropolis.
    …"
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • Fort Pierce News (Fort Pierce, Fla.), July 2, 1909, p. unk, col. 2.
    "At the Head.
    It is stated in Mr. and Mrs. Ponnella's "Life of James MacNeill Whistler" in that part which relates to his brief West Point career that the great American painter was not "soldierly in appearance, bearing or habit." Whistler's horsemanship is said to have been hardly better than his scholarship. According to General Webb, it was not wholly unusual for him at cavalry drill to go sliding over his horse's head. On such occasions Major Sackett, then in command, would call out: "Mr. Whistler, aren't you a little ahead of the squad?" According to Whistler's version by the Ponnella's, Major Sackett's remark was: "Mr. Whistler, I am pleased to see you for once at the head of your class.""
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The St. Lucie County Tribune, (Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Fla.), September 10, 1909, p. 2, col. 2.
    "TERSE TOPICS
    The Association of the Florida Nation National Guard met in Tampa last week and elected officers as follows; President Gen. C. P. Lowell, of Jacksonville; first vice-president, Gen. J. W. Sackett, of Jacksonville; second vice-president, Col. F. X. Schuller, of Orlando; secretary, Major M. Henry Cohen, of Tampa; treasurer, Capt R L Buckman, of Jacksonville."
    [Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)]
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • Fort Pierce News (Fort Pierce, Fla.), September 24, 1909, p. unk, col. 5.
    "MINUTES OF SCHOOL BOARD
    Regular September Meeting of Board of Public Instruction

    The following accounts were ordered paid:

    Chas Sackett work on No 10.....8.00
    Mrs C Sackett cleaning No 10.....2.75"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The St. Lucie County Tribune, (Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Fla.), November 19, 1909, p. 5, col. 2.
    "WHITE CITY
    Roll of honor White City school for week ending November 12th: Miss Sophia Miller, Miss Jessie Sackett."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The St. Lucie County Tribune, (Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Fla.), November 26, 1909, p. 5, col. 3.
    "WHITE CITY
    Roll of honor of White City school for week ending November 19th: Jessie Sackett, Bertha Sackett, Cora Cameron, Helen Platts, Virginia Findley."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The Pensacola Journal, (Pensacola, Fla.), December 19, 1909, Third Section, p. 20, col. 1–4, & p. 21, col. 1–4.
    History of the Mississippi to Atlantic Waterway Association
    by Leland J. Henderson
    [Transcriber's note: The article is about the proposed system of intercoastal canals (or waterway) running "from the mouth of the Rio Grande river in Texas to the coasts of Maine." Listed among the delegates to the first annual convention held in Columbus, Ga. (page 20, column 4) is a "J. V. Sackett, Jacksonville, Fla." On page 21, col 1, a "J. W. Sackett, Jacksonville, Fla." is listed as an attendee to the second annual convention. In both mentionings, this is Gen. John Warren Sackett (1860–1918)].
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The St. Lucie County Tribune, (Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Fla.), December 24, 1909, p. 5, col. 3.
    "WHITE CITY
    Mrs. Sackett's brother and family, of Sanford, arrived Monday evening to spend Christmas with Mrs. Sackett."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The St. Lucie County Tribune, (Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Fla.), March 04, 1910, p. 3, col. 3.
    "WHITE CITY
    Mrs. Sackett and daughter, Bertha, attended the dedication services at the Catholic church in Fort Pierce Sunday."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The St. Lucie County Tribune, (Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Fla.), September 9, 1910, p. 8, col. 3.
    "SCHOOL BOARD MEET IN REGULAR SESSION

    After auditing and drawing warrants for the following bills the board adjourned until the next regular session.

    Sarah Sackett, labor No. 9.....$3.00
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The St. Lucie County Tribune, (Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Fla.), December 23, 1910, p. 11, col. 2.
    "COMMISSIONERS' WARRANTS
    The following bills were approved and warrants ordered drawn for same at the meeting of the County Commissioners held December 6th.

    C Sackett, 2O days bridge work.....$3.38
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • Fort Pierce News, (Fort Pierce, Fla.), December 23, 1910, p. unk, col. 4.
    "COMMISSIONERS' WARRANTS

    The following accounts were ordered paid:

    C Sackett bridge work.....$3.38
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The St. Lucie County Tribune, (Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Fla.), December 30, 1910, p. 3, col. 2.
    "WHITE CITY
    Chas. Sackett, who was painfully injured last week by falling from his wagon, is improving nicely nicely."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The St. Lucie County Tribune, (Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Fla.), January 20, 1911, p. 4, col. 2.
    "Mrs. C. Sacket gave a coffee party last Wednesday in honor of her daughter, Mrs. F. Segbow. The following ladies were present: Mrs. C. Plates, Mrs. Bell, Mrs. Cambell, Mrs. Dutton, Mrs. Fransen, Mrs. Jorgensen, Mrs. Jones. Mrs. Pasco and Mrs. Traynor."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The St. Lucie County Tribune, (Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Fla.), February 17, 1911, p. 6, col. 2.
    "COMMISSIONERS' WARRANTS

    ROAD AND BRIDGE WORK
    … C Sackett, road and bridge work $12.00
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • Fort Pierce News (Fort Pierce, Fla.), April 28, 1911, p. unk, col. 2.
    "School Board Warrants
    The warrants drawn by the Board of Public Instruction this month are as follows:

    Chas. Sackett labor.....$2.00
    …"
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]
  • The St. Lucie County Tribune, (Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Fla.), September 15, 1911, p. 4, col. 2.
    "IN MEMORIAM
    Whereas; It has pleased our Heavenly Father in His wisdom to remove from our midst our esteemed brother, Reverend E. T. R. Fripp, therefore be it
    Resolved, By the Sunday School of White City, that we express our appreciation of his noble Christian character and his earnest work among us.
    Resolved, That we cherish his memory and emulate his example; that we extend to his sorrowing children and grandchildren our heartfelt sympathy and commend them to Him whose infinite love has so long been spared to them.
    Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be spread on the minutes of our Sunday School, published in the Fort Pierce papers and a copy sent to the family.
    PHILLIPS PLATT
    WILL JORGENSEN
    JESSIE SACKETT
    Committee."
    [Transcribed from Library of Congress image by Michael Trickey]

Source:
"Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers," digital image, Library of Congress (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/).