Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado

Newspaper Abstracts

  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, 11 July 1896, p. 4.
    "At a regular meeting of Cornet Falls Lodge NO. 52, A.O.U.W., held last evening in Masonic hall, Deputy Grand Master Workman, W. C. Green installed the following officrs of the ensuing term: M. M. W., H. R. Goff: M. W., Orrin M. Sackett: T., T. L. Sloan: O., C. R. Mc Doughal: recorder, Geo. C. Chatwin: receiver, S. B. Hall: Financier, Erl Gigelow: I. W., W. R. Collins: trustee, Geo. H. Phillips."
    [Orrin M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, July 12, 1896, p. 4
    "Hotel Arrivals
    American
    H. M. Sackett, Trenton, N. J."
    [Homer M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, 25 July 1896, p. 2.
    "Cornet Falls Lodge No. 52 A.O.U.W.
    Regular meetings every Friday evening at 5 o'clock in Masonic hall. Visiting brothers welcome.
    Orrin M. Sackett
    Geo. C Chatwin, Recorder.
    L. Erl Bigelow, Financier."
    [Orrin M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, June 3, 1898, p. 2
    "Operations Begun.
    The preparatory work for the erection of a tramway from the mill site of the United States and British Columbia Mining and Milling Company to their mines at the head of Cornet Basin, is under way. Mr. H. M. Sackett, representative of the Mine and Mill Supply Company, arrived a few days ago with his assistant and draughtsman, and at once began work. The tram will be over two miles in length, and will be in operation by fall.
    Mr. Sackett promises one of the finest trams in the state, and his past record is a guarantee that he will do what he says."
    [Homer M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, June 15, 1898, p. 4
    "H. M. Sackett, after spending several days in Telluride and vicinity reviewing the probable line of the contemplated tramway to be erected from near the Japan mines, Savage basin, to Pandora, a distance of about two miles, returned over the range to Silverton yesterday afternoon. He says the contemplated tram while perfectly feasable would be a very expensive one and believes it will hardly be built for some timee to come. Mr. Sackett is now superintending the construction of a Bleichert tramway 9,300 feet in length, manufactured by the Trenton Iron Works, Trenton, N. J., for the Iowa Gold Mining company near Silverton."
    [Homer M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, September 2, 1898, p. 1
    "Machine Works Change Hands.
    Yesterday the San Juan Machine Works were purchased by H. M. Sackett and hearafter the business will be carried on in a business way, as Mr. Sackett is well known here and is a business man of good reputation.
    Mr. Sackett has in his employ nothing but first-class blacksmiths and mechanics, and is deserving of substantial support by those wishing anything in his line of business." [Homer M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, September 9, 1898, p. 2
    "ANOTHER BIG MINING CORPORATION ORGANIZED
    [Continued from page 1.]

    The president of the corporation Col. Page recently arrived in Telluride and is now arranging the preliminaries for the commencement of operations.
    A few days ago he visited the properties in Bridal Veil, accompanied by several gentlemen, among them Mr. H. M. Sackett and Mr. Jas. Fitzgerald. The latter is well known throughout the San Juan as a practical miner of an extended experience that entitles his judgement on the value of mining property and the best method for its development to no inconsiderable weight. He pronounces the Gold Cable group one of the most promising of any he has recently examined. …
    Mr. Sackett is the gentleman who has erected several of the big tramway systems of this section, having recently completed one nearly a mile and a half in length for the United States and British Columbia company. Col. Page's purpose in taking him over the property was to secure reliable estimates and plans for a tramway from the mines to the railroad track, at the head of the valley, where it is the purpose of the company to erect a large stamp mill for the reduction of their ores."
    [Homer M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, October 1, 1898, p. 1
    "Machine Works Change Hands.
    Yesterday the San Juan Machine Works were purchased by H. M. Sackett and here after the business will be carried on in a business way, as Mr. Sackett is well known here and is a business man of good reputation.
    Mr. Sackett has in his employ nothing but first-class blacksmiths and mechanics, and is deserving of substantial support by those wishing anything in his line of business."
    [Homer M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, October 1, 1898, p. 4
    "DISSOLUTION NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the co-partnership heretofore existing between Geo. P. Betts and H. M. Sackett, conducting a livery business under the firm name of Geo. P. Betts & Co., is this day dissolved by mutual consent. H. M. Sackett retiring from said firm, Geo P. Betts becomes sole proprietor, and will collect all bills due said firm and pay all outstanding accounts.
    Dated at Telluride, October 1, 1898
    Geo. P. Betts,
    H. M. Sackett."
    [Homer M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, September 6, 1899, p. 4
    "Mrs E. H. Sackett and the children were arrivals in Telluride Monday evening from Denver and as Mr. Sackett is master mechanic at the Telluride Iron Works, they will reside here permanently."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, Jun 28, 1901, p. 3
    "H. M. Sackett went down to Haskill on the morning train and spent the day there on business."
    [Homer M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, March 20, 1903, p. 3
    "H. M. Sackett returned last evening from his Denver business trip."
    [Homer M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, October 19, 1903, p. 3
    "Saturday evening Mrs. Ed Sackett was the victim of a runaway, being thrown from the buggy and considerably bruised but not seriously injured. She had driven Mrs. Orrin Sackett up to Pandora and returning home had almost reached the house when the staid old family horse took it into his head to run away and did so."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, 29 December 1905, p. 1.
    "A little child of Mr. and Mrs. O. M. Sackett at Pandora was carrying a bottle in its hands last evening when it tripped and fell, breaking the bottle and cutting itself quite badly across the forehead, both eye lids being severed and the cut extending underneath the eye far enough to cut an artery, from which it bled profusely. Dr. Edgar Hadley was called, who treated the wound, and left the little one in as good shape as a wound of this character would permit."
    [Orrin M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, January 5, 1907, p. 3
    "Miss Anna Sackett returned to Greeley today to resume her studies Monday morning at the Normal School."
    [Anna Charlotte (Sudenga) Sackett, stepdau of Edward Harvey & dau of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 17 July 1907, p. 1
    TELLURIDE MAN GIVES EVIDENCE AT BOISE TODAY
    O. M. Sackett Tells of Rain of Balls From Peaceful Miners at Smuggler July 3 1901 and Produces Paper Signed by St John Where the Czar Agreed to call of[f] his Mob of Murderers.
    Boise, July 17:—On the opening of court this morning Richardson notified the state that the defense desired that three of the state witnesses remain in town. Judge Wood announced that prior to the opening of arguments he would notify counsel as to the main points in evidence on which he would instruct the jury. Darrow for the defense announced that the sur-rebuttal would be very short.
    O. M. Sackett, of Telluride, Colorado, for fifteen years an employe[e] of the Smuggler-Union mine, was the first witness of the day. He told of his personal experiences in the big riot at the Smuggler-Union in 1901, when, he said, he and several other employe[e]s were compelled to run through a perfect hail of bullets in order to get to the mine. He said Vincent St. John was the head of the Telluride union at the time.
    The witness next told of negotiating with St. John to have the firing stopped and reached an agreement with him.
    The witness said that as a result of the negotiations he had with St. John, an agreement between Edgar A. Collins, assistant manager of the mine, and St. John, president of the union, was drawn up and signed.
    The agreement was offered in evidence and although the defense objected, the Judge allowed it to be filed.
    The agreement was dated July 3, 1901. In it Collins agreed to cease work on the mine for a period of three days and the Miners' union agreed to refrain from violence for the same period.
    The witness then told of the killing of Arthur Collins, superintendent of the mine, the disappearance of several miners in the district and various disorders. He said the men were afraid to work and many of them were shot at on their way to the mines and it was because of these conditions that troops were brought into the district and martial law proclaimed.
    On cross-examination Sackett said the trouble in 1901 lasted only three days.
    "Then the agreement went into effect and the matter was settled and everything continued peaceful in the district until late in 1903, didn't it," aksed Richardson.
    "Well, there was a sort of armed neutrality."
    Richardson read the witness and the jury another agreement entered into July 16, 1901, by the mine and the union in which it set forth that the differences between the mine and the union had been amicably adjusted, the union expressing "entire disapproval of the recent outrages: and agreeing not to molest union or non- union workers.
    Richardson asked if this agreement was not in effect up to the general strike of 1903.
    "Ostensibly." replied the witness.
    The witness justified the action of the Citizens' Alliance in taking the law into their own hands and deporting [blank space]. He said it was necessary and that they had the law of self defense to support them. He said since the deportations everything had been quiet and satisfactory in the district.
    At the luncheon recess the Judge announced that if possible he desired the state to close its rebuttal during the afternoon.
    [Orrin M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, December 23, 1907, p. 4
    "Miss Gussie Sackett, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Sackett, came in Saturday night from Denver where she has been attending the Central Business College. Her return at this time was somewhat of a surprise to her parents, but none the less acceptable to them."
    [Augusta Louise (Sudenga) Sackett, stepdau of Edward Harvey & dau of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, December 26, 1907, p. 5
    "Miss Anna Sackett, a student of the Greeley State Normal, came home Saturday night and will be here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Sackett, during the holidays."
    [Anna Charlotte (Sudenga) Sackett, stepdau of Edward Harvey & dau of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, May 14, 1908, p. 6
    "Eminent Bacteriologist.
    While the uncontaminated air and perpetual sunshine of Colorado, coupled with the crystal key of irrigation which unlocks the treasure chest of a rich soil, combine to produce marvelous yields, there is the ever present bacteria to foster and to combat. Realizing the importance of careful study and investigation of the various bacterial forms of plant diseases, Prof. W. Paddock, for a number of years past has patiently conducted a line of research that has resulted in great benefit to the general farming interests of the state. So great have the demands upon his time and energy become that it has been found necessary to employ a specialist. Mr. W. B. Sackett has been appointed to the position of Bacteriologist, of the Colorado Experiment Station, and will enter upon his important duties immediately.
    Professor Sackett brings a broad training and a wide practical knowledge of his subject to Colorado. Graduating from Ohio State University, he completed a post-graduate course of study in Chicago University, after which he was engaged as bacteriologist in connection with the Chicago drainage canal suit. Later he was in the employ of the government. For the past four years, Professor Sackett has been assistant professor of bacteriology in the Michigan Agricultural college."
    [2863 Prof. Walter Cadwell Gamwell Sackett s. Frederick & Jane M (Gamwell) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, June 18, 1908, p. 6
    "Is Now Proprietor de Facto.
    For some four or five years the Telluride foundry and iron works has been under the management and supervision of Mr. E. H. Sackett, brother of H. M., the founder and owner of the plant, who meanwhile has held a most desirable and lucrative position as general traveling representative of the Trenton, New Jersey, iron works.
    Some weeks ago on the occasion of a visit from H. M., the Journal mentioned the purchase of the entire plant by E. H. Sackett. This week the final papers completing the transfer have gone on record.
    The Journal congratulates Ed upon the acquisition of this growing and important manufacturing enterprise, certain that the able and skillful business management that has characterized the administration of E. H. will be continued and that the plant, already one of the important industries of the town, giving employment at liberal wages to numerous skilled workmen, will continue to prosper and expand. In addition to his demonstrated managerial, business capacity, E. H. Sackett, is himself a practical, skilled, mechanic in this line of work, having advanced from the bottom through industry and zeal, to the proprietorship of the machiine shop and foundry which he has developed from quite an insignificant affair into a moulding and machinery plant that practically eliminates all necessity of the big mills, in case of needed repairs or new parts, sending to outside points, and experiencing often delay and shut-downs, sometimes covering several days and always involving more or less serious loss of idleness.
    Not only is the Telluride Iron Works and foundry an important factor in the general prosperity of the community, but it is a great convenience in the saving of time and money to the mining and milling industry.
    It is, therefore, a matter of congratulation that its ownership and management is in the hands of so competent, capable and conscientious a man, always at the lead in every movement for the advance and general progress of the community."
    [Homer M Sackett & Edward Harvey Sackett sons of Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, November 12, 1908, p. 8
    "E. H. Sackett has purchased the interest of Tom Junker in the Contention lease, and the leasing firm is now composed of Mr. Sackett and J. A. Nutzleb, the latter being one of the original leasers."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, May 29, 1910 "Miss Anna Sackett who has been teaching school at Norwood has returned to her home in Telluride for the summer."
    [Anna Charlotte (Sudenga) Sackett, stepdau of Edward Harvey & dau of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 29 May 1912, p. 1
    "O. M. Sackett Badly Injured
    Just at the time of going to press the Journal was informed that Mr. O. M. Sackett, superintendent of tramways at the Smuggler-Union, had been quite seriously injured.
    Mr. Sackett was engaged in doing some work on the Little Mary tram and while on a tower came in contact with a 10,000 volt power line. He was thrown to the ground, striking on his shoulder and breaking it. At 3:45 Mr Sackett had just reached the Bullion tunnel where the doctor was making an examination to determine the extent of his injuries."
    [Orrin M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 30 May 1912, p. 1
    "O. M. SACKETT FALLS 35 FEET FROM TRAM
    Came in Contact With 10,000 Volt Wire and Was Thrown to Ground Sustaining Some Severe Burns and Injuries—Not as Bad as First Reported
    O. M. Sackett, superintendent of tramway for the Smuggler-Union company, met with a very serious accident yesterday while engaged in doing some repair work on the Little Mary tram. Mr Sackett came in contact with a 10,000 volt power line and was thrown to the ground, a distance of about 35 feet, sustaining some severe bruises.
    It appears that a bucket had gotten off of the tram in some manner and Mr. Sackett and his assistants were engaged in putting it back on the cable. Mr. Sackett had climbed to the highest tower of the tramway, this tower being located just at the Union dump. In some manner which he is unable to explain he came in contact with the power line and the shock which was sent through his body knocked him from the tower. He fell to the ground and landed on his back on a pile of rocks. He says he remembers nothing from the time he came in contact with the wires until he was being brought down the hill.
    He was at once picked up by his assistants who were working with him at the time and carried down to the Bullion tunnel, where he received attention until the ambulance could get there from this city and bring him to the hospital. He arrived at the hospital about 5 o'clock.
    All sorts of rumors were rife on the streets yesterday afternoon as to the result of the accident, but the Journal is gratified to learn this morning that Mr. Sackett's injuries are not nearly as serious as at first reported, although they are serious enough and will keep him on the shelf for some time. His back is very badly sprained and his shoulder is bruised up pretty badly, but is not broken as was first reported. He has a severe scalp wound and a cut over his eye. Mr. Sackett also has several burns where he came in contact with the high tension wires. One of these burns is on his leg, another on his hand and a couple on his back.
    The injured man passed a fairly comfortable night and was resting as well as could be expected this morning. The surgeons have not as yet determined whether or not he has any internal injuries, but think he has none."
    [Orrin M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • Telluride Journal, Telluride, Colorado, December 5, 1912, p. 6
    "Mr. and Mrs. Roy Stewart were down from their Liberty Bell home to participate in Thanksgiving festivities with friends and relatives."
    [Mrs Roy Stewart = Augusta Louise (Sudenga) Sackett stepdau of Edward Harvey Sackett & dau of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, September 9, 1913, p. 4.
    "To Grand Junction.— Mrs. O. M. Sackett and daughter, Miss Gertrude, were departures on the morning's northbound for Grand Junction, where they will visit for a short time while Miss Gertrude consults an oculist regarding some difficulty with her eyes. They expect to return home the latter part of the week."
    [Orrin M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, September 23, 1913, p. 3
    "Purely Personal
    Roy Stewart came up last night from Newmire to join Mrs. Stewart who came up Tuesday evening. They will spend the Fourth in the city."
    [Mrs Roy Stewart = Augusta Louise (Sudenga) Sackett stepdau of Edward Harvey Sackett & dau of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 22 Jan 1914
    "Left for Salida—
    Mrs E. H. Sackett left this morning for Salida to join Mr. Sackett, who has been engaged the past couple of weeks in putting the finishing touches on a big tram which he constructed at Garfield. They will go on from Salida to Denver to take in the Stock Show, which opened in the Capital city this morning. Mr. Sackett will return here in the course of a few days, while Mrs. Sackett will visit in Denver for a period of ten days or longer. The report which was circulated to the effect that Mr. Sackett had submitted to a serious operation in a Salida hospital is entirely erroneous and without foundation, according to Henry Sackett, who says his father has been far too busy to spend any time with an operation."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, January 22, 1914, p. 7
    "Roy Stewart, electrician at the Primos Chemical company plant at Vanadium, came up Saturday night to visit with Mrs. Stewart, who is at present making her home in this city. He missed the train yesterday morning and rode back to the plant later in the day."
    [Mrs Roy Stewart = Augusta Louise (Sudenga) Sackett stepdau of Edward Harvey Sackett & dau of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, April 2, 1914, p. 3
    "Roy Stewart, electrician at the Primos Chemical company plant at Vanadium, came up last night, and accompanied by Mrs. Stewart and infant who have been visiting in the city for several days, left on the return trip home this morning."
    [Mrs Roy Stewart = Augusta Louise (Sudenga) Sackett stepdau of Edward Harvey Sackett & dau of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, September 23, 1914, p. 3
    "Mrs. Roy Stewart visited in the city yesterday from her home at the Liberty Bell curve station."
    [Mrs Roy Stewart = Augusta Louise (Sudenga) Sackett stepdau of Edward Harvey Sackett & dau of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, October 26, 1914, p. 3
    "Mr. and Mrs. Roy Stewart and little son drove up this morning."
    [Mrs Roy Stewart = Augusta Louise (Sudenga) Sackett stepdau of Edward Harvey Sackett & dau of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, December 26, 1914, p. 3
    "Mr. and Mrs. Roy Stewart and infant, who spent Christmas here with relatives, returned to their home at Vanadium on the morning's train."
    [Mrs Roy Stewart = Augusta Louise (Sudenga) Sackett stepdau of Edward Harvey Sackett & dau of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, January 8, 1915, p. 4
    "To Oray.—
    E. H. Sackett, proprietor of the Telluride Iron Works, who spent yesterday at Ophir figuring on the construction of a tram hoist at one of the properties there, returned home last night. He left on the northbound train this morning for Ridgeway, continuing to Oray to complete some business affairs."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, April 12, 1915, p. 3
    "To Newmire.—
    Mrs. Roy Stewart and tiny babe accompanied by Miss Hattie Adams, the nurse, left this morning for the Stewart home at Vanadium. Mrs. Stewart left the Hadley hospital yesterday." [Mrs Roy Stewart = Augusta Louise (Sudenga) Sackett stepdau of Edward Harvey Sackett & dau of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, September 13, 1915, p. 4
    "Motoring to Wyoming—
    Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Sackett and son, Henry, left here this morning in their Overland car for Wyoming where they will file upon some land with a view to going into the cattle business. Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Sackett expect to remain in Wyoming for several weeks. Henry Sackett will return here within the course of a couple or three weeks. While absent he will attend the state convention of Elks, being the delegate from the Telluride lodge."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, September 29, 1915, p. 4
    "Injured in 15-Foot Fall.—
    Henry Sackett, who has been employed in the new cyanide plant of the tomboy property in Savage basin, assisting in assembling machinery, sustained a severe fracture of the left forearm, as well as several bruises about the head and body, in a fall from a trestle last evening. Shortly after 4 o'clock as he was leaving work, Mr. Sackett attempted to skirt an ore car which was standing on the trestle, and in so doing lost his footing, falling to the ravine below, a distance of about 15 feet. The principal injury is a bad fracture of the left forearm. Physicians were summoned and Mr. Sackett's wounds dressed, after which he was brought to the Hadley Hospital, where the fracture was reduced. The injured man left the hospital this morning, moving to his home on West Pacific avenue. His unfortuante accident will serve to prevent him from resuming his work for several weeks."
    [Henry Louis (Sudenga) Sackett stepson of Edward Harvey & son of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, Colorado, October 19, 1915, p. 4
    "LOCAL NEWS NOTES
    Back From Grand Junction—
    Henry Sackett returned home Sunday night from a trip to Grand Junction where he went to get the Sackett Overland car. He had tough luck bringing the car back here and a breakdnown near Ridgway caused him to leave the car there for repairs, coming home Sunday night aboard the train."
    [Henry Louis (Sudenga) Sackett stepson of Edward Harvey & son of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 11 Feb 1916, Front Page
    ED. SACKETT IN JAIL FOR SHOOTING MAN AT TWIN LAKES.
    Reports State That Proprietor of Local Iron Works Shot and Dangerously Wounded Mine Owner in Tramway Settlement—Many Rumors But Late Reports Show Man Still Alive—Sackett in Jail at Leadville.
    Denver, Feb. 11.—The Rocky Mountain News yesterday carried a Leadville story to the effect that E. H. Sackett, owner of the Telluride Iron Works at Telluride, had shot and dangerously injured Dr. J. S. Rider of Chicago, one of the owners of the Gordon- Tiger mining property. The shooting happend at Twin Lakes, about 15 miles from Leadville.
    According to the story in the News Sackett had completed the construction of a tramway from the mine to the mill and when the two met at a Twin Lake hotel to settle a disagreement followed and Sackett shot Dr. Rider. There were no eye witnesses to the shooting and as yet neither of the men have made a statement of what happened.
    The reports state that after the shooting [of] Dr. Rider, Sackett assisted him to a reclining position on a bed and then summoned medical aid.
    Even today no confirmation had been received here of the reports yesterday that Dr. Rider had died, as the shot is reported to have been fatal, at the office of the News here this afternoon it is believed that he lived, and is now recovering.
    ——
    In response to an inquiry, the Journal this afternoon received the above dispatch from Denver, telling of a shooting affray in which E. H. Sackett of this city participated. Nothing was known of the trouble until late last night when a Mr. King, who travels for a wire rope concern, called up Mr. Sackett's relatives here and informed them of the story he read in the Denver papers. Other than that they knew nothing of the trouble and shooting, but Mrs. Sackett, her son Henry and O. M. Sackett, a brother of E. H. Sackett left this morning for Leadville to be with Mr. Sackett and learn the truth of the whole affair.
    In a telephone conversation with Sheriff Harry Schraeder of Lake County at Leadville this afternoon, Sheriff Edward Hoffamn here learned the following particulars of this case:
    According to Sheriff Shraeder Mr. Sackett, who for some time past has been building a tramway on the Gordon- Tiger mining property had had words with Dr. J. S. Rider, who though he is not one of the officials of the company, is interested in it to the extent of about $10,000. The latest argument they had was several days ago, when Dr. Rider refused payment on the tramway on the ground that Sackett had not fufilled his contract in that the tramway was not in good working order. As the Leadville sheriff's story goes, Mr. Sackett then went back to the property at Twin Lakes, Near Leadville, and worked with the tramway for several days until as he claimed it was in good working order. He again demanded payment from Dr. Rider but the latter refused it on the same grounds.
    Sackett is then reported to have gone out and borrowed an automatic pistol from a man named McCarthy, saying he wanted to kill a dog. With this pistol he returned to the mine boarding house where a game of cards was in progress and where Dr. Rider was coaching one of the women in the game on the plays to be made. Finally Dr. Rider left the room where the game was being played and went to this own room. Sacket [sic] followed him there and
    [Continued to Page Three]
    forced an entrance to the room. Here another heated argument ensued and Dr. Rider finally ordered Sackett out of the room. As Sackett stepped into the hallway from the room, Dr. Rider followed him and it was there that Sackett pulled the automatic pistol and shot the doctor. Whether or not there was any argument or fighting in the hall, the Journal has been unable to learn.
    At 2 o'clock this afternoon reports from Leadville were that Dr. Rider, who was shot through the lungs, was still alive and had a chance for recovery in the event that no complications set in. At that time Mr. Sackett was still in the Leadville Jail, no bail having been arranged.
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 14 Feb 1916, Front Page & p. 2
    "SACKETT SAYS HE INTENDED USING GUN ON HIMSELF
    Leadville Paper Gives Account of Incidents Leading Up to the Shooting—Sackett Gives Remarkable Statement in Leadville Jail—Says He Intended to Commit Suicide
    Telephonic advices from Leadville late this afternoon state that the verdict of the coroner's jury at the inquest over the body of Dr. Rider states that Dr. Rider came to his death from a gunshot wound from a gun in the hands of E. H. Sackett. The verdict did not recite whether it was with felonious intent or without, that part not being determined.
    The advices this afternoon from Leadville are also to the effect that sentiment there at this time is very much in favor of Sackett.
    Following is the account of the Twin Lakes shooting of last Wednesday in which E. H. Sackett of this city shot and killed Dr. Rider. The article reproduced below is taken from Saturday morning's Leadville Herald-Democrat, which arrived here last night:
    A tragic ending to Twin Lakes' Wednesday night shooting affray, the first fatal shooting in Lake county in three years, resulted last night. Dr. G. P. Rider, of Wilmette, Ill., one of the principal owners of the Twin Lakes Mining and Milling company, died at St. Vincent's Hospital at 5:50 in the afternoon from the effects of the revolver shot, for firing which E. H. Sackett, a tram contractor of Telluride, is held at the county Jail. Coroner O'Malia took charge of the body.
    After being carried to Leadville by wagon Thursday morning by G. W. Boyce, manager of the company, and a physician, Dr. Rider suffered a relapse yesterday which made way for a touch of pheumonia. The disease, coupled with the dangerous wound through the lower part of the left lung caused an alarming sinking spell, which ceased only with the mining man's death.
    No arrangements have been made by C. H. Adams, president of the company, Manager Boyce and other friends regarding the shipment of the body. Mrs. Rider, who was notified at Wilmette late Wednesday night, is expected to arrive here this morning. The shock of the Doctor's death saddened the mining men last night and their faces were grave. Dr. Rider was a strong, heavy set man, about 50 years old, and in excellent health at the time of the shooting.
    N. G. Van Deventer, with whom he had been associated in steel fence manufacturing near Chicago since his retirement from medical practice, returned to the city yesterday from Denver and Pueblo where he went on business Tuesday.
    At the county jail Sackett spen[t] the day in moody depression. Part of it he devoted to writing out with a pencil his statement of his business relations with the Twin Lakes Mining and Milling company and the events which led up to the fatal shooting. Then he told Jailer Philbrick he would like to see a reporter.
    This statement the contractor made after declining to talk about the affair on Thursday. Realization of the seriousness of the occurrence and the agitating effect resulting put him in no mood for talking the previous day, he said yesterday.
    "I am sorry, of course." he said, after inquiring in to the conditions of Dr. Rider.
    He believed the mining company was about to "beat him out" of his contract payment for the construction of a tram line from the Gordon mine to the mill near the edge of the village.
    "I've been beat out of three contracts by three different companies lately," he said. "I was desperate, I don't know—I must have been mad. I kept brooding over the thing til I didn't know what to do."
    While depressed over the adverse relations with the company, he said in his statement, he borrowed a gun with the intentions of ending his trouble by suicide, but his nerve failed him.
    Then, as he sat in the hotel Wednesday evening, thinking over the situation, he decided he would go to Dr. Rider's room and get a definite statement regarding the payment. He had no idea of encountering a serious quarrel, he said. When the doctor told him to come in on the morrow to talk, Sackett said he forced the door.
    But as he struck a match to light the lamp in the room, he asserted, the mining man sprang out of bed and rushed at him, and the contractor fired, missing the mark. Dr. Rider continued to come towards him, Sackett said, and he fired again, the bullet this time striking the man in the lower part of the left lung, above the stomach, and passing out at his back.
    "He came at me and struck at me as I went to strike a light." the contrac[t]or declared through the bars at the [j]ail. "My matches are always in my right vest pocket, too. He struck at me and did strike me, right there on the right cheek. I had a scratch there where his finger nail reached my face."
    A small scratch less than a quarter of an inch long, was still on the contractor's right cheek, just below the eye.
    Sackett is a man of middle height, with a sandy, almost reddish mustache, and dark brown hair nearly bald over the crown of his head. His face and expression seems frank and open. Only when he recounted that three companies have caused him trouble with his contracts and two have recently tricked him out of his payments did his blue eyes express the agitation feelings which these adversities had awakened.
    During the conversation he said there was no card game at the hotel at Twin Lakes Wednesday evening, as narrated Thursday, and he had not played with Dr. Rider.
    His statement, which follows, relates the making of the agreement with the Gordon Tiger people to erect the tram line and the difficulties which resulted this month. He said:
    "I have just read an account in the Post of the tragedy which occurred at Twin Lakes on the evening of February 9 in which I was one of the principal actors. The account is very inaccurate and while seeking no excuse for my rash act, yet I wish to place the facts before the public.
    "On November 13, 1915, I received a Telephone call from Twin-Lakes, asking me to come over and look at a tramway proposition. As I was leaving Telluride for Wyoming the next day, I told them that I would come that way and look over their proposition.
    "On November 15 I did arrive at Twin Lakes and looked over the job, and told them that the work could be done and for what, if they had, as they represented, enough good seven-eights inch wire rope to make the standing, or track ropes. I then went on my way to Rock Springs, Wyoming.
    "At that place, or Pinedale, I wired them that the work must be cash when the job was completed, as my work there had taken all my available money and I could grant them no time on the payment of the same.
    "About Dec. 11 or 12, I received a wire from them that the money had been raised to build the tram and asked me when I could come. I wired them about Dec. 27 would be the best I could do, and received another wire asking me to come sooner if possible.
    "I wired in reply that I could be there about December 20 or 21.
    "I arrived in Twin Lakes on December 20. In the meantime, I had instructed them to have the cable hauled up the hill and to get me two good carpenters and have them on the ground to commence work.
    "I started work on the job on December 21nd the 22nd went home for Christmas, and did not get back until December 27.
    "Upon examination I found that most of the cable that they had on hand was defective from bad handling when being taken from the place where they had bought it, and that it would require about 3,800 feet of new cable which they agreed to pay for.
    "They also decided to change their plans and put in ore bins at the mill, also to raise the floor of the mill so th[a]t the ore from the bin would not have to be shoveled up to the crusher— all of which they were to pay for in addition to the contract for erecting the tramway as at first contemplated.
    "I ask Mr. VanDeventoer and Mr. Rider for a settlement about the 5th of February, and they said the tram was not working, notwithstanding that they were getting all of the ore they were producing over it.
    "On the 8th, Mr Boyce, the manager, came to me at the hotel and told me to go up and fix the tram, as the bucket was jumping off the cable at the lower end.
    "I went up and found that the man who had been running it, had run the bucket in at the lower end so fast that it had bent the guard, on the bucket so that when it went over the automatic trip, instead of dumping it threw the bucket off the line.
    "I then went to Mr. Boyce and told him what the trouble was, and told him I would not be responsible for the operation by men w[ith] no experience.
    "Hot words followed in which he suggested that I go up on the 9th and run it, and if I could handle it successfully they would pay for it: to which I replied that if one single thing happened while I was running it, I would make them a present of the tram.
    "On the 9th I went up and ran the line all day without a single mishap, hauling all the ore that they could get out and not having to operate more than two-thirds of the time.
    "I went to Mr. Boyce on the evening of the 9th and apologized for my hot language, and asked him if he was satisfied that the tram would do the work and he replied by saying, 'Yes, Sackett, the tram is all right, but I can't pay you, for Vandeventer and Rider re- fuse to put up any more money until some title is straightened up.'
    "I told him that, involved as I was it would break me, to which he replied that he was sorry.
    "VanDeventer and Adams, president and secretary of the company, had gone. Rider was going the next day.
    "I borrowed a gun with which to end it all, but I had not the courage.
    "I sat brooding in the office of the hotel.
    At last I turned to Mr. Shepard and said, "What has the clearing of the title got to do with the payment of my account?" and his reply was, 'What has it got to do with the pay- ing of the men and me?'
    "I got up – saying, 'I am going to have a settlement now.'
    "I went to Rider's room and knocked and asked to talk to him. He replied that he was in bed and would not talk until tomorrow, to which I replied, 'I am going to talk now.'
    "At this I forced the door, went in and asked him what he proposed to do in regard to paying me, to which he replied, 'I have nothing to do with paying you—no more than you have.'
    "I said, 'The hell you have not! Why did you promise to pay me for it, then?'
    "I then took a match from my vest pocket to strike his light, at which he sprang from bed, rushed at me, saying, 'Damn you, get out of here!'
    "I dropped the match, fired, and as he still kept coming, striking at me, I fired again, at which he stopped.
    "You know the rest.
    "E. H. Sackett"
    Sackett said that local men who believe that they are acquainted with him, have probably mistaken him for his brother. The latter has never been in politics in Telluride, or San Miguel county, though he himself was city alderman there last spring. He has notified his wife and children of his predicament, and the former may come to Leadville shortly.
    Late last night a telephone call from Salida from Sackett's son announced that he had reached that town on his way to Leadville and will arrive here this morning."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 17 Feb 1916, Front Page
    "MURDER CHARGE IS FILED AGAINST E. H. SACKETT
    Information Filed By District Attorney at Leadville Charges Murder With "Premeditated Malice Aforethought" —In Jail Without Bail
    Only a few hours before a coroner's jury returned the verdict that Dr. G. P. Rider of Wilmette, Ill., "came to his death by a gun shot wound from a gun in the hand of one Edward Sackett" yesterday afternoon. Deputy District Attorney Bond entered a direct information charging murder with "premeditated malice aforethought," against Sackett in the district court before Judge Charles Cavender, yesterday morning.
    Sackett was conducted from the jail to the courtroom, and heard the charge read. He was not arraigned, however, and therefore entered no plea.
    L. W. Allen, a lawyer of Telluride, retained by Sackett, arrived in town in the morning, and attended both the court session and the inquest, though he asked no questions at either.
    Sackett will be held at the county jail without bond until his case is called for hearing in the March term, which begins on the first Monday of next month.
    No new developments appeared from the examination of witnesses at the inquest called by Coroner E. R. O'Malia.
    Sackett called at Fred Oleson's house early Wednesday evening last after Oleson had gone to bed, the latter testified, and asking to borrow a gun, said, "I want to kill a dog."
    Dogs had been raising a disturbance in the neighborhood recently, Oleson said, and he thought nothing of the Telluride tram contractor's request. He believed it was then about 8 o'clock, though he had no clock to note the exact hour. About 9 o'clock or later, he said, he had got up to replenish the fire and was sitting on the edge of the bed, as Sackett returned and handed over the revolver without a word.
    "Did you kill your dog?" Oleson said he asked, and Sackett replied:
    "Yes, I got one of them."
    Oleson had heard a dim shot in the meantime, but he had supposed it was Sackett firing at the dog.
    All of the four witnesses from Twin Lakes who were called told stories which corresponded in detail regarding the death of Dr. Rider, the retired physician and member of the Twin Lakes Mining and Milling company, whose death has caused Sackett's in- carceration.
    Dr. Rider's death Friday evening last was caused by the bullet wound and not by a touch of pneumonia, testified Dr. R. J. McDonald, who with Dr. E. A. Whitmore and Dr. H. A. Calkins performed an autopsy Saturday.
    The jury was composed of John J. Bohen, foreman: A. Lumseden, George J. Murray, William F. Jennesey, Samuel Thomas and George Murphy.—From Tuesday's Leadville Herald-Democrat."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 10 Mar 1916, p. 8
    "Sackett's Case Set for March 27—
    The March term of the District court opened yesterday when Judge Cavender convened court at 10 o'clock with several important cases on the docket. The first of the term was taken up chiefly with the fixing of the calendar for the rest of the term, 15 civil cases and three criminal cases being set for trial. A panel of forty petit jurors was ordered drawn returnable on Monday, March 27, at 9 a. m. The case of E. H. Sackett, charged with the murder of Dr. G. P. Rider at Twin Lakes, February 9, was set for trial on March 27. Rider was shot by Sackett over a dispute in regard to payment of money which Sackett claimed was due him at the Gordon-Tiger mine owned by the Twin-Lakes Mining and Milling company in which Rider was a large stockholder. Sackett was arraigned yesterday and pleaded not guilty to the charge of murder.—Leadville Herald-Democrat."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 28 Mar 1916, Front Page
    "SACKETT TRIAL PROGRESSING AT LEADVILLE
    Friends here last night in a telephone conversation with Telluride people attending the Sackett trial in Leadville learned that the trial of E. H. Sackett for killing Dr. G. P. Rider at Twin Lakes on Feb. 9, started yesterday morning. The first business was securing a jury to try the case, this being accomplished by mid-afternoon, at which time the taking of testimony was started and was progressing at 1:30 last night.
    According to this telephone conversation, the public sentiment in Leadville is apparently with Sackett, and the Telluride people are of the opinion that he will not be convicted."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 31 Mar 1916, Front Page
    "SACKETT FOUND INSANE BY JURY—AMOUNTS TO ACQUITTAL OF MURDER CHARGE
    E. H. Sackett of this city who was tried in the district court at Leadville the first of the week for killing Dr. G. P. Rider at Twin Lakes on Feb. 9, was last night adjudged insane by the jury which heard the evidence in the case. This was the report received by the Journal this afternoon direct from Leadville.
    Local people last night received brief telegrams stating that Sackett has been acquitted and the news spread about the city within a short time.
    The Journal is indebted to the Leadville Herald-Democrat for its information today. In our telephone conversation we learned that the defense of Sackett was confined to witnesses, some 15 or 20 in number, all of whom testified to matters and happenings which would lead to the belief that Sackett was insane. Dr. Delehanty, the alienist retained by the defense, stated on the stand that he had made a careful examination of Sackett and he pronounced the man to be suffering from hypo-mania.
    The jury which heard the evidence in the case went out last evening at 5 o'clock after hearing the closing arguments of the prosecution and the defense and the instructions of the court.
    At about 9:30 the jurors filed back into the court room with their verdict which declared that Sackett was insane, which in reality is an acquittal on the murder charge against him. Judge Cavender, who presided at the trial, recommended following this verdict that Sackett be placed in a private sanitarium.
    Following the announcement of the verdict Sackett was remanded to the custody of Sheriff Harry Schraeder. Up to 2 o'clock this afternoon nothing had been done toward sending Sackett to any asylum, but it is believed that some action will be taken wihin the next day or two."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 5 Apr 1916, p. 4
    "Sackett Taken to Sanitarium—
    H. M. Sackett of South Haven, Mich., a brother, was given custody by Judge Cavender in the district court yesterday morning of Ed H. Sackett, the Telluride tram contractor declared insane by a jury Thursday after he had been tried on the charge of murder of Dr. G. P. Rider, of Wilmette, Ill., at Twin Lakes on the night of Feb. 9. Sackett's brothers declare it would be impossible to keep their brother in confinement at an asylum unless he was made to understand that the court retains jurisdiction over him. Under the arrangements made therefore, Sackett will be kept at the Mt. Airy sanitarium Twelfth and Clermont streets, Denver, until the court accedes to requests for his release. Sackett's family will bear the expenses of his care, it was agreed.
    H. M. Sackett left the city with his brother yesterday morning. It is possible Sackett may be taken to a sanitarium at a lower altitude than Denver later on. At present the State asylum at Pueblo is filled, it is understood here.
    Under the legislative provisions defendants found insane, as in Sackett's case, are ordered confined in the criminal ward of the state asylum, but no appropriation for their care there is made, it is said, and the provision therefore cannot be carried out literally.—Leadville Herald-Democrat"
    [Homer M Sackett & Edward Harvey Sackett sons of Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 12 April 1916, p. 3
    UP-TO-DATE GARAGE OPENED IN CONNECTION WITH MACHINE SHOP
    Telluride Garage Opened by H. L. Sackett—Is Thoroughly equipped and in Charge of Expert—Will be in Charge of Expert Repair Man—Handle all Kinds of Accessories
    Telluride now has an up-to-date and fully equipped garage which can take care of all kinds of automobile and motorcycle repair work, while at the same time can supply automobilists with gasoline, oils, and all kinds of accessories, including tires, etc. The garage has been opened by Henry L. Sackett of the Telluride Iron Works company and will be operated by that enterprising young business man of the city. He now has everything in readiness to care for the automobilists every want and has placed the garage in charge of an expert and thoroughly experienced man.
    Some months ago Mr. Sackett secured possession of the old laundry building adjoining the Iron Works plant on West Pacific avenue and since that time has been engaged in completely remodelling the same until he now has it thoroughly equipped and fitted up as a first class and up-to-date garage, which can turn out all kinds of work on short notice. He has arranged for free air, and any and all automobilists or motor- cyclists who desire air for their tires are invited to call at the Telluride garage and get plenty of it as there will always be a big supply on hand. He today placed on the sidewalk at the garage a thoroughly complete and up to date gasoline filling station, which will prove a great convenience to motorists, they having but to drive up alongside the curb when the man in charge of the garage will fill their gasoline tanks. In addition to these things a splendid vulcanizing plant has been installed and is already turning out first class work with an iron clad guarantee. All kinds of automobile accessories and parts are on hand and a goodly supply of the famour Miller and Fisk tires.
    The garage is in charge of Mr. Lou T. Amernoin, an expert automobile man who came here several weeks ago from Rifle and who since that time has been getting the plant in shape, and will now be in charge. He knows the business from A to Z having been engaged in it for the past 14 years.
    Next door to the garage is the fine machine shop of the Telluride Iron Works company of which there is none better in the state, it being in charge of that Past Master Louis Schuler. With this combination to handle anything in the line of automobile repair work from furnishing the smallest screw, to almost building a new car. The foundry and machine shop of the company has for a number of years proved to be reliable and has always stood back of all work done, and the same will be true of the garage.
    An auto livery, day or night anywhere at reasonable rates, with an expert driver at the wheel, is also another phase of the business which will be catered by Mr. Sackett at the new garage.
    Mr. Sackett has an advertisement elsewhere in this issue calling attention to the garage and asks for a share of your patronage.
    [Henry Louis (Sudenga) Sackett stepson of Edward Harvey & son of Louisa (Becker) (Sudenga) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 28 July 1916
    "O. M. Sackett, superintendant of tramways for the Smuggler Mining Co. accompanied by Mrs. Sackett and daughter left for Durango on this morning's train." [Orrin M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 31 July 1916
    MRS. O. M. SACKETT FAILS TO RECOVER FROM OPERATION
    Mrs. O. M. Sackett, who was taken to the Ochsner hospital at Durango for surgical traeatment last Friday, was unable to stand the ordeal of the serious operation which was performed there Saturday, and died in that institution this morning at 11 o'clock. She was known to be suffering from appendicitis when she left her with her husband and daughter, Gertrude, and the family physician, Dr. D. A. Bronson, of the Smuggler-Union mines. It was thought that there were other complications, and when placed on the operating table it was discovered that Mrs. Sackett had a tumer and gall stones in additon to appendicitis.
    Mrs. Sackett came to Pandora many years ago, and was one of the best known and esteemed women of this section. The sympathy of the entire community is extended to the bereaved relatives in their sorrow.
    Deceased was 48 years old at the time of her death. Three near relatives, her husband and two children, Gertrude and Thorwald, are left to survive her. The son, who is with the Marigold Dredging Co., at Marysville, Cal., at the present time, was wired information of his mother's demise this afternoon. H. M. Sackett, a brother of Mr. Sackett, located at South Haven, Mich., was also informed of the death.
    Mrs Sackett had been ill for some time prior to going to Durango, but was a patient sufferer, doing all she could to lighten the burden of sorrow resting on her family during the illness in which it was feared she was fast fading away. She came back from Fort Collins in April wih her children who had been attending school there and has not been at all well since that time.
    Her condition became serious on Saturday, July 22, when Dr. Bronson was called. She grew rapidly worse, and he advised taking her to the hospital during last week. Dr. Bronson left Durango Sunday morning arriving in Telluride last night. At the time he left, Mrs. Sackett seemed to be recovering from the previous day's operation, and he felt that she would soon be out of danger.
    The body will be sent from Durango tomorrow, arriving here tomorrow evening. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.
    [Orrin M Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 26 Oct 1921, p. 4
    "Matt Lingol left Telluride Tuesday morning bound for Aspen, where he will assist in the work of building an aerial tramway. Mr. Lingol goes to the silver mining camp at the request of E. H. Sackett, formerly of Telluride, who has secured the contract to construct a wire rope tramway for an Aspen mining company."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 29 Mar 1922, p. 2
    "Ten Years Ago Today [29 Mar 1912]
    E. H. Sackett has begun the work of completely remodeling and enlarging his Telluride Iron Works plant on Pacific avenue. In addition to the iron works improvements he will install a complete and up-to-date plumbing shop."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 26 May 1922, p. 3
    "Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Sackett motored to Telluride Thursday evening and will spend a short time in the city on a combined business and pleasure trip. Mr. and Mrs Sackett are being welcomed by their many friends in Telluride. They formerly resided here, but about two years ago removed to Arvada, near Denver, where they have since been making their home."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]
  • The Daily Journal, Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado, 30 May 1922, p. 4
    "Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Sackett motored out Monday afternoon on the return trip to their home in Arvada, near Denver. They spent the past few days here visiting with former friends."
    [Edward Harvey Sackett s. Solomon Ashman & Sarah (Morehouse) Sackett]

Source:
Website Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (http://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org). (Researched by Thurmon King).